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Multiple gateways on one network RRS feed

  • Question

  • Good afternoon,

    could anyone help me with some networking please.

    We currently have a network with a DHCP server (192.168.0.X) and 2 x routers.

    Router A: 192.168.0.1

    Router B: 192.168.0.2

    At the moment DHCP scope is set with both of these addresses in the "Router" with Router A being the first.

    How would i go about setting a small handful of computers to use Router B as their default gateway and have LAN access too.

    thank you.

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 11:22 AM

Answers

  • I think you have to do that, but it can be done more easily from the SBS by making DHCP reservations for the computers. Having made a reservation, based on the MAC address, you can override all the DHCP information sent including router. The computers themselves can be left on DHCP. How to do this is reasonably obvious if you dig into the DHCP server in Server Manager. If you have Charlie Russel's SBS2008 book it's on page 439 and following.

    Joe

    • Proposed as answer by Susie Long Friday, October 3, 2014 8:24 AM
    • Marked as answer by Susie Long Monday, October 6, 2014 2:01 AM
    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 8:50 PM
  • I was assuming the DHCP server was the SBS. With a full-function DHCP server, when you make a reservation you give out a particular IP address to a particular computer, and you can also push a different set of parameters to the reserved computer than the ones that go to the main DHCP pool computers. This includes the 'router' parameter. So the reserved computer still picks up its configuration by DHCP, but it may get different configuration values than an unreserved computer would get.

    You don't actually say that you are using the SBS for DHCP, if you are using one of the routers, it may not have this level of flexibility. A major DHCP server can provide a range of configuration options to a computer, not just the IP address and gateway, but also the hostname, domain name and many implementation-specific options such as WINS node type.

    Joe

    • Marked as answer by Susie Long Wednesday, October 8, 2014 6:27 AM
    Saturday, September 27, 2014 5:33 PM

All replies

  • For one of the gateways, let the SBS DHCP server issue IP settings for that gateway. For systems that you prefer use the second gateway, set a static IP with the IP of the second router as the gateway.

    BTW, 0 0r 1 in the third octet may interfere if you ever want to establish VPN's from other locations to your LAN because so many home systems use 0 or 1 in that octet.  And, it is very easy for hackers to guess and lowers the effort needed to break into your network.  Use something like 192.168.37.xxx.


    Larry Struckmeyer[MVP] If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 11:37 AM
  • Hi Larry, thanks for the reply.

    is there no way I could do this with routes?

    I'd rather not have to go around these computers and set TCP/IP to static.

    thanks.

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 11:42 AM
  • Hi:

    I don't know of anyway to do it with routes.  Consider that you want a sub set of the total... you said a handful... to use router 2.  Any route statement that would be available to that group would be available to all.

    However, there is an awful lot I don't know, and subnetting and such is one of the things I have never had to deal with since SBS is, by design, a Class C LAN.

    There are others on this list that do, and there are other forums that deal with thousands of computers in class B and class A networks.  Perhaps you can find an answer there if no one gives one here.  Wait a day or two and if nothing turns up try a Windows Server or a TCP/IP forum.

    If you do get an answer that works from outside this forum please come back here and let us all know.  If you do go outside the SBS forum, don't mention SBS or they will knee-jerk reaction send you back here.


    Larry Struckmeyer[MVP] If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 12:08 PM
  • Yes, a handful meaning 5 computers.

    it may be that we have the set them up with static addresses but lets see if anyone else has any feedback.

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 3:41 PM
  • I think you have to do that, but it can be done more easily from the SBS by making DHCP reservations for the computers. Having made a reservation, based on the MAC address, you can override all the DHCP information sent including router. The computers themselves can be left on DHCP. How to do this is reasonably obvious if you dig into the DHCP server in Server Manager. If you have Charlie Russel's SBS2008 book it's on page 439 and following.

    Joe

    • Proposed as answer by Susie Long Friday, October 3, 2014 8:24 AM
    • Marked as answer by Susie Long Monday, October 6, 2014 2:01 AM
    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 8:50 PM
  • See, I said someone would know how... although I am not sure it is "easier" for 5 stations.  But it is centrally managed, a goal to be desired, and more easily undone if and when you choose to undo it.

    Thanks, Joe... I forgot about that.  This is why I lurk in these forums... (helps)keep the "little grey cells" from rotting.


    Larry Struckmeyer[MVP] If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.


    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 9:08 PM
  • That's what I meant by 'easier', that it could all be done from the SBS, possibly remotely if the MAC addresses are all visible. The OP mentioned 'go around these computers', which suggests they aren't all grouped together.

    Joe

    Wednesday, September 24, 2014 9:19 PM
  • Hi,

    i need to add that all the PCs are on the same LAN.

    I can reserve the IP of the PCs i want to use the second gateway.

    However, how then do I get them to "bypass the router" from DHCP without setting their TCP/IP ?

    Thursday, September 25, 2014 9:24 AM
  • When you link an IP to the MAC address of a printer or a computer or any ip device you force the device to use the ip you assign to it.  It will simply ignore the DHCP server.

    Larry Struckmeyer[MVP] If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Thursday, September 25, 2014 9:35 PM
  • I was assuming the DHCP server was the SBS. With a full-function DHCP server, when you make a reservation you give out a particular IP address to a particular computer, and you can also push a different set of parameters to the reserved computer than the ones that go to the main DHCP pool computers. This includes the 'router' parameter. So the reserved computer still picks up its configuration by DHCP, but it may get different configuration values than an unreserved computer would get.

    You don't actually say that you are using the SBS for DHCP, if you are using one of the routers, it may not have this level of flexibility. A major DHCP server can provide a range of configuration options to a computer, not just the IP address and gateway, but also the hostname, domain name and many implementation-specific options such as WINS node type.

    Joe

    • Marked as answer by Susie Long Wednesday, October 8, 2014 6:27 AM
    Saturday, September 27, 2014 5:33 PM
  • Thanks Joe.

    this is exactly what i did.

    i didn't know you could change the scope settings of reservations.

    kudos!

    :)

    Tuesday, October 7, 2014 12:08 PM