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Steps to decommission the last exchange 2003 and 2007 from my environment. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi there:

    In the environment that I'm working currently , the previous email admin left a few exchange 2003 boxes in the past migration, and nowadays we are almost done with migration from exchange 2007-2010.

    In high level, I want to ask which steps should we follow up for a safe decommission of those old servers (exchange 2003 and 2007).

    Additional information:

    Users contained on exchange 2003 and 2007: No one.
    Users hosted on exchange 2010 servers: ALL (around 14000).

    Specific doubts:

    What server decommission should be done first, exchange 2003 or exchange 2007?


    My only concern right now is with exchange 2003 , time back I was checking some user attributes and noticed that we have a bunch of users (exact number is unknown) that in their Distinguished Name are pointing to the Old Exchange 2003 Organization.

    What happened if we uninstall the last exchange 2003 box? Does this will take off that old orgazanization with all those user attributes?

    Or do we have first need to identify all those users pointing to old the environment and pointing them to the new one?


    JASM

    Wednesday, December 30, 2015 6:12 PM

Answers

  • Make sure that if you shut down the systems or remove them from the network that you do it for only a week or so.  If they are offline for too long, their machine accounts will be locked out and you will have to rejoin the domain in order to remove Exchange from them - believe me, this is more trouble than it's worth, so keep track of when they go offline so you can put them back on the network in a timely fashion.

    Additionally, if you do this, you are going to have event log warnings and errors since your Exchange 2010 servers won't be able to contact these systems.  These events will let you know why the remaining systems are trying to contact your systems - you can determine whether they can be ignored by their context.


    Will Martin ...
    -join ('77696c6c406d617274696e2d66616d696c6965732e6f7267' -split '(?<=\G.{2})' | ? { $_ } | % { [char][int]"0x$_" })

    Thursday, December 31, 2015 1:00 PM

All replies

  • If there are no aspects of your organization that require the Exchange 2003 server(s), you should uninstall Exchange from that (those) server(s). You should also have no issues with the uninstall.  As for organizational issues, the Exchange 2003 organization is the Exchange 2007/2001 organization - there is no difference between them.  You needn't worry about removing the server itself - that won't affect the underlying organization beyond the fact that the server will no longer exist in it.

    The same is true about your Exchange 2007 server(s) - if nothing relies on it (them), feel free to uninstall Exchange from it (them) after you have removed your Exchange 2003 server(s).


    Will Martin ...
    -join ('77696c6c406d617274696e2d66616d696c6965732e6f7267' -split '(?<=\G.{2})' | ? { $_ } | % { [char][int]"0x$_" })

    Wednesday, December 30, 2015 8:52 PM
  • Hi,

    Could understand your doubt.

    Can you shut down the Exchange 2003 & Exchange 2007 (not uninstalling the exchange) and observe for some time.

    That is the right way when the migration process completes and to start the decommission process. So that you come to know if you have any issues with user end. Also other client mail facilities as well as application perspective.

    • Edited by krselva Wednesday, December 30, 2015 11:25 PM
    Wednesday, December 30, 2015 11:24 PM
  • Hi,

    You needn't worry about removing the servers because there no resources any more, for the safe side as suggested just unplug them from the network for a while and watch the situation, if there are no issues you noticed then straight away remove them. the below link is helpful.

    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg576862%28v=exchg.141%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

    regards,

    MB Shaikh

    Thursday, December 31, 2015 10:15 AM
  • Make sure that if you shut down the systems or remove them from the network that you do it for only a week or so.  If they are offline for too long, their machine accounts will be locked out and you will have to rejoin the domain in order to remove Exchange from them - believe me, this is more trouble than it's worth, so keep track of when they go offline so you can put them back on the network in a timely fashion.

    Additionally, if you do this, you are going to have event log warnings and errors since your Exchange 2010 servers won't be able to contact these systems.  These events will let you know why the remaining systems are trying to contact your systems - you can determine whether they can be ignored by their context.


    Will Martin ...
    -join ('77696c6c406d617274696e2d66616d696c6965732e6f7267' -split '(?<=\G.{2})' | ? { $_ } | % { [char][int]"0x$_" })

    Thursday, December 31, 2015 1:00 PM