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Dell Inspiron got unresponsive and automatically restart RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello, I got a serious computer problems and I still haven't able to find out why. I really appreciate if  someone could help!!!

    First is the problem. in the last 2 days, my computer has became unresponsive and then automatically restarted several times per day. It mostly (but not 100% of the time) happened when I used Google Chrome for viewing websites with photos or playing online games. This problem did not happen before. After restarting, sometimes it got frozen again when the desktop icons and the "internet" icon started to show and I had to turn off the computer by pressing the button (But it ran perfectly in Safe mode all the times). I have checked the internal temperature of the hardware (with HWMonitor) and it seems the core is a bit hot, around 50 something or a bit over 60.

    This is information about my computer:

    Windows 7 Professional 32-bit;

    Intel(R) Core(TM) i3 CPU   M 330 @ 2.13GHz;     RAM 2GB 

    I have checked Event Viewer, and it has showed a lot of Warning and Error around the time of sudden restarting (I wanted to upload the screenshot but cannot). There are Errors of Event 6008, EventLog, and Event 10001, BugCheck (The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck.  The bugcheck was: 0x00000124 (0x00000000, 0x86fde8fc, 0x00000000, 0x00000000). A dump was saved in: C:\Windows\Minidump\051513-28407-01.dmp. Report Id: 051513-28407-01.).

    Then there is one marked as Critical,  Event ID 41, Kernel-Power with the information as the following:

    - System
    - Provider
    Name] Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power
    Guid] {331C3B3A-2005-44C2-AC5E-77220C37D6B4}
    EventID 41
    Version 2
    Level 1
    Task 63
    Opcode 0
    Keywords 0x8000000000000002
    - TimeCreated
    SystemTime] 2013-05-15T16:14:28.040823800Z
    EventRecordID 620982
    Correlation
    - Execution
    ProcessID] 4
    ThreadID] 8
    Channel System
    Computer ChimCon-PC
    - Security
    UserID] S-1-5-18
    - EventData
    BugcheckCode 0
    BugcheckParameter1 0x0
    BugcheckParameter2 0x0
    BugcheckParameter3 0x0
    BugcheckParameter4 0x0
    SleepInProgress false

    PowerButtonTimestamp

    0

    PLEASE, help me!!! 

    
    Wednesday, May 15, 2013 5:14 PM

Answers

  • Stop 0x124 is a hardware error
    If you are overclocking try resetting your processor to standard settings and see if that helps.
    If you continue to get BSOD here are some more things you may want to consider.

    This is usually heat related, defective hardware, memory or even processor though it is"possible" that it is driver related (rare).

    Stop 0x124 - what it means and what to try

    Synopsis:
    A "stop 0x124" is fundamentally different to many other types of bluescreens because it stems from a hardware complaint.
    Stop 0x124 minidumps contain very little practical information, and it is therefore necessary to approach the problem as a case of hardware in an unknown state of distress.


     Generic "Stop 0x124" Troubleshooting Strategy:

    1) Ensure that none of the hardware components are overclocked. Hardware that is driven beyond its design specifications - by overclocking - can malfunction in unpredictable ways.
    2) Ensure that the machine is adequately cooled.
     If there is any doubt, open up the side of the PC case (be mindful of any relevant warranty conditions!) and point a mains fan squarely at the motherboard. That will rule out most (lack of) cooling issues.
    3) Update all hardware-related drivers: video, sound, RAID (if any), NIC... anything that interacts with a piece of hardware.
    It is good practice to run the latest drivers anyway.
    4) Update the motherboard BIOS according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    Their website should provide detailed instructions as to the brand and model-specific procedure.
    5) Rarely, bugs in the OS may cause "false positive" 0x124 events where the hardware wasn't complaining but Windows thought otherwise (because of the bug).
    At the time of writing, Windows 7 is not known to suffer from any such defects, but it is nevertheless important to always keep Windows itself updated.
    6) Attempt to (stress) test those hardware components which can be put through their paces artificially.
    The most obvious examples are the RAM and HDD(s).
    For the RAM, use the in-built memory diagnostics (run MDSCHED) or the 3rd-party memtest86 utility to run many hours worth of testing.
    For hard drives, check whether CHKDSK /R finds any problems on the drive(s), notably "bad sectors".
    Unreliable RAM, in particular, is deadly as far as software is concerned, and anything other than a 100% clear memory test result is cause for concern. Unfortunately, even a 100% clear result from the diagnostics utilities does not guarantee that the RAM is free from defects - only that none were encountered during the test passes.
    7) As the last of the non-invasive troubleshooting steps, perform a "vanilla" reinstallation of Windows: just the OS itself without any additional applications, games, utilities, updates, or new drivers - NOTHING AT ALL that is not sourced from the Windows 7 disc.
    Should that fail to mitigate the 0x124 problem, jump to the next steps.
    If you run the "vanilla" installation long enough to convince yourself that not a single 0x124 crash has occurred, start installing updates and applications slowly, always pausing between successive additions long enough to get a feel for whether the machine is still free from 0x124 crashes.
    Should the crashing resume, obviously the very last software addition(s) may be somehow linked to the root cause.
    If stop 0x124 errors persist despite the steps above, and the hardware is under warranty, consider returning it and requesting a replacement which does not suffer periodic MCE events.
    Be aware that attempting the subsequent hardware troubleshooting steps may, in some cases, void your warranty:
    8) Clean and carefully remove any dust from the inside of the machine.
    Reseat all connectors and memory modules.
    Use a can of compressed air to clean out the RAM DIMM sockets as much as possible.
    9) If all else fails, start removing items of hardware one-by-one in the hope that the culprit is something non-essential which can be removed.
    Obviously, this type of testing is a lot easier if you've got access to equivalent components in order to perform swaps.

    Should you find yourself in the situation of having performed all of the steps above without a resolution of the symptom, unfortunately the most likely reason is because the error message is literally correct - something is fundamentally wrong with the machine's hardware.

    BugCheck 124, {0, 86fde8fc, 0, 0}

    Probably caused by : GenuineIntel

    WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR (124)
    A fatal hardware error has occurred. Parameter 1 identifies the type of error
    source that reported the error. Parameter 2 holds the address of the
    WHEA_ERROR_RECORD structure that describes the error conditon.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: 00000000, Machine Check Exception
    Since it mentions Genuine Intel it may be the CPU.  Follow all the instructions and if nec we can give you further stress tests.


    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, May 15, 2013 5:54 PM

All replies

  • We do need the actual DMP file as it contains the only record of the sequence of events leading up to the crash, what drivers were loaded, and what was responsible.
    You may be able to get the DMP files without crashing by booting into safe mode (F8) with networking.
    If you are overclocking stop.  (chances are if you dont know if you are, you are not)a
    To enable us to assist you with your computer's BSOD symptoms, upload the contents of your "\Windows\Minidump" folder.  We need at least 2 DMP FILES to diagnose and confirm


    The procedure:

    * Copy the contents of \Windows\Minidump to another (temporary) location somewhere on your machine.
    * Zip up the copy.
    * Attach the ZIP archive to your post using the "paperclip" (file attachments) button. (if available on  your site, MS doesnt have this)
     *Please upload them to a file sharing service like Skydrive or"Rapidshare" and put a link to them in your reply.
    Link for how to  upload below.
    http://www.wikihow.com/Use-SkyDrive

    To ensure minidumps are enabled:

    * Go to Start, in the Search Box type: sysdm.cpl, press Enter.
    * Under the Advanced tab, click on the Startup and Recovery Settings... button.
    * Ensure that Automatically restart is unchecked.
    * Under the Write Debugging Information header select Small memory dump (256 kB) in the dropdown box (the 256kb varies).
    * Ensure that the Small Dump Directory is listed as %systemroot%\Minidump.
    * OK your way out.
    * Reboot if changes have been made.

    Please also run MSinfo32 and upload the output as well.
    To run MSinfo32 please go to start>run>MSinfo32
    Go to "file" "save" and upload the saved file with the DMPS
    System specs are extremely useful so please include whatever you know.

    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, May 15, 2013 5:19 PM
  • Thank you very much for your response. These are the files that you mentioned:

    https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=9BB806DC2C8273A7!134

    https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=9BB806DC2C8273A7!133

    https://skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=9BB806DC2C8273A7!135

    Wednesday, May 15, 2013 5:45 PM
  • Stop 0x124 is a hardware error
    If you are overclocking try resetting your processor to standard settings and see if that helps.
    If you continue to get BSOD here are some more things you may want to consider.

    This is usually heat related, defective hardware, memory or even processor though it is"possible" that it is driver related (rare).

    Stop 0x124 - what it means and what to try

    Synopsis:
    A "stop 0x124" is fundamentally different to many other types of bluescreens because it stems from a hardware complaint.
    Stop 0x124 minidumps contain very little practical information, and it is therefore necessary to approach the problem as a case of hardware in an unknown state of distress.


     Generic "Stop 0x124" Troubleshooting Strategy:

    1) Ensure that none of the hardware components are overclocked. Hardware that is driven beyond its design specifications - by overclocking - can malfunction in unpredictable ways.
    2) Ensure that the machine is adequately cooled.
     If there is any doubt, open up the side of the PC case (be mindful of any relevant warranty conditions!) and point a mains fan squarely at the motherboard. That will rule out most (lack of) cooling issues.
    3) Update all hardware-related drivers: video, sound, RAID (if any), NIC... anything that interacts with a piece of hardware.
    It is good practice to run the latest drivers anyway.
    4) Update the motherboard BIOS according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    Their website should provide detailed instructions as to the brand and model-specific procedure.
    5) Rarely, bugs in the OS may cause "false positive" 0x124 events where the hardware wasn't complaining but Windows thought otherwise (because of the bug).
    At the time of writing, Windows 7 is not known to suffer from any such defects, but it is nevertheless important to always keep Windows itself updated.
    6) Attempt to (stress) test those hardware components which can be put through their paces artificially.
    The most obvious examples are the RAM and HDD(s).
    For the RAM, use the in-built memory diagnostics (run MDSCHED) or the 3rd-party memtest86 utility to run many hours worth of testing.
    For hard drives, check whether CHKDSK /R finds any problems on the drive(s), notably "bad sectors".
    Unreliable RAM, in particular, is deadly as far as software is concerned, and anything other than a 100% clear memory test result is cause for concern. Unfortunately, even a 100% clear result from the diagnostics utilities does not guarantee that the RAM is free from defects - only that none were encountered during the test passes.
    7) As the last of the non-invasive troubleshooting steps, perform a "vanilla" reinstallation of Windows: just the OS itself without any additional applications, games, utilities, updates, or new drivers - NOTHING AT ALL that is not sourced from the Windows 7 disc.
    Should that fail to mitigate the 0x124 problem, jump to the next steps.
    If you run the "vanilla" installation long enough to convince yourself that not a single 0x124 crash has occurred, start installing updates and applications slowly, always pausing between successive additions long enough to get a feel for whether the machine is still free from 0x124 crashes.
    Should the crashing resume, obviously the very last software addition(s) may be somehow linked to the root cause.
    If stop 0x124 errors persist despite the steps above, and the hardware is under warranty, consider returning it and requesting a replacement which does not suffer periodic MCE events.
    Be aware that attempting the subsequent hardware troubleshooting steps may, in some cases, void your warranty:
    8) Clean and carefully remove any dust from the inside of the machine.
    Reseat all connectors and memory modules.
    Use a can of compressed air to clean out the RAM DIMM sockets as much as possible.
    9) If all else fails, start removing items of hardware one-by-one in the hope that the culprit is something non-essential which can be removed.
    Obviously, this type of testing is a lot easier if you've got access to equivalent components in order to perform swaps.

    Should you find yourself in the situation of having performed all of the steps above without a resolution of the symptom, unfortunately the most likely reason is because the error message is literally correct - something is fundamentally wrong with the machine's hardware.

    BugCheck 124, {0, 86fde8fc, 0, 0}

    Probably caused by : GenuineIntel

    WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR (124)
    A fatal hardware error has occurred. Parameter 1 identifies the type of error
    source that reported the error. Parameter 2 holds the address of the
    WHEA_ERROR_RECORD structure that describes the error conditon.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: 00000000, Machine Check Exception
    Since it mentions Genuine Intel it may be the CPU.  Follow all the instructions and if nec we can give you further stress tests.


    Wanikiya & Dyami--Team Zigzag

    Wednesday, May 15, 2013 5:54 PM