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Request: Hibernate and protect disk-- superfast startup every boot! RRS feed

  • Question

  • One of the biggest difficulties for me as a network administrator for small rural school districts, is that we simply cannot afford the latest and greatest technology. Instead the technology budget is so tight that we usually end up running older and slower equipment that is at least 3-5 years behind the curve. It is quite common to still (STILL!) find classrooms and libraries filled with 1.0 ghz and even 700 mhz PCs.

     

    An older machine weighed down with a modern OS like Windows XP plus antivirus and antispyware scanners can take a really long time to get ready to actually do any work. And meanwhile I get pressure from my bosses to have the machines turned off when not in use to conserve energy. This means that for every class that needs the machines, they must turn on the machine when they enter the room and endure perhaps five minutes of OS booting and virus scanning before it all settles down and is FINALLY ready to do whatever the user wants to do.

     

    The staff and students complain about the slow computers but in general there is nothing I can do about it. And meanwhile their class time is being frittered away by the machine doing its constant boot-time disk scans before the system really becomes ready to use.

     

     

    Through some experimentation, I have discovered that if hibernation is enabled and nobody is logged in, a desktop computer will hibernate at the login prompt, after all the scanning and booting and loading and so forth have all settled down and the system is quietly sitting idle for someone to login.

     

    When the system comes out of hibernation, virus scans are already done and all system services are already in a state of readyness to go to work. It just takes a few seconds for DHCP to redetect the network address, and it is immediately ready for someone to login and get to work.

     

     

    Therefore I must ask the developers of this software to please, please, please... come up with a way for disk protection to be enabled after the machine has hibernated. You will save the users of slow machines many agonizing minutes of waiting and waiting for the disk-protected system to reach the point of really finally being ready to do work, since for every reboot it will come out of hibernation and go straight to the idle login prompt in seconds.

     

    An alternate step in this direction that I still have not found any way to do, is to only enable hibernation at the login prompt but deny the logged-in user the option of hibernating. This prevents a student from hibernating the machine while they are logged in, but still allows the idle machibe to self-hibernate at the login prompt.

     

    -Dale

    Friday, July 27, 2007 9:36 PM

Answers

  •  

    Hi Dale,

     

    Please understand that, based on the design of SteadyState, we cannot achieve this with Hibernation. You can refer to the following thread:

     

    http://forums.microsoft.com/WindowsToolsandUtilities/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=1839651&SiteID=69

     

    We will forward this feed back to our develop team. If there is any update, we will post here as soon as possible.

     

    Best Regards,

    Monday, July 30, 2007 8:52 AM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Dale,

     

    Please understand that, based on the design of SteadyState, we cannot achieve this with Hibernation. You can refer to the following thread:

     

    http://forums.microsoft.com/WindowsToolsandUtilities/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=1839651&SiteID=69

     

    We will forward this feed back to our develop team. If there is any update, we will post here as soon as possible.

     

    Best Regards,

    Monday, July 30, 2007 8:52 AM
  • I'm not certain if this will help and I realize this post is old but we are doing something similiar.  We are using Windows SteadyState with disk protection and with hibernation enabled.  The main difference being we enter into hibernation when we press the power button and are still logged in.  The trick for us to get this to work was to create the user account with administrator access (instead of limited) and to enter a restore date for the disk protection in the distant future.  This proved to be of minor consequence since we are using SteadyState to restrict the user anyway and when we need to fix and clear the system we just change the date in disk protection to remove changes at restart. 

     

    There is one downside, if the computer shuts off for any reason, be power failure, manual restart, or Windows update, you'll get an error screen on reboot.  However, just click Delete Restoration File and the system will boot without having lost any information.

    Tuesday, December 9, 2008 10:46 PM
  • Hi,

    I strongly recommend against trying to use hibernation while Windows Disk Protection is enabled.  There are technical incompatibilities between these two technologies that forced us to disable hibernation when WDP is in use.  Circumventing this by turning hibernation back on will likely lead to data loss or corruption at some point. 

    Using sleep/standby should work fine, however.  Hopefully this is a suitable workaround in your circumstances.

    Thanks,
    Rob Elmer
    Development Lead
    Windows SteadyState
    Wednesday, December 10, 2008 8:21 AM
  • Thanks for the suggestion.  Lets see if we can make that work.

     

    That's funny.  I looked at one of my posts from a year ago and you said something similiar.  I should have listened than.

    Thursday, December 11, 2008 12:28 AM