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How to set up Recycle bin the deleted file will go to its own drive. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have Windows 8.1 Pro and 4 logical drives/partitions, C, D (Recovery disk), E, and F. Right now, the deleted file goes to all recycle bin folders, even the recovery disk when I delete a file. Is there any way I can set up the recycle bin the deleted file will go to $RECYCLE.BIN. on its own drive.
    Thanks.

    cy


    cy

    Tuesday, January 6, 2015 9:53 PM

Answers

  • Hi DiWu,

    OK. I did more tests on your test case plus mine. Yes. You are correct. The deleted file went to its own recycle bin. I also found out that the original location was shown if we looked at the deleted file in each recycle bin with details view. It is much helpful. My only concern is that why each recycle bin shows all deleted files and also each recycle bin only cleans up its own deleted file if we clean up the deleted file in Disk Cleanup. Any explanation will be helpful but it is not necessary. Thanks. 


    cy

    • Marked as answer by ChingH Tuesday, January 13, 2015 11:27 PM
    Tuesday, January 13, 2015 11:27 PM

All replies

  • Hi ChingH,

    I did some test on my machine, found that there is one $RECYCLE.BIN folder in every partition,  I deleted one 700m size file in my D partition. Then found that only the $RECYCLE.BIN folder in D became to 700mb size. And same one in C is still 4mb.

    So actually by default the recycle bin is doing its job as the way you need. First you need to custom Maximum size in every partition in Recycle Bin properties. Then uncheck Hide protected operating system files in your Folder views Option.

    This PC->View->Options->change folder and search options->View

    Then you could find $RECYCLE.BIN folder in every partition. Try deleting files check if they go to $RECYCLE.BIN in their own partition.

    Regards

    Wednesday, January 7, 2015 9:34 AM
  • Thank you for your reply. I tested it. I changed the size of recycle bin on F drive to 12000 MB then checked the check box "Hide protected operating system files" and unchecked it again. The deleted file still goes to every recycle bin folder. The reason I wanted to make this work was 1. I don't want that the deleted file goes to my c drive. I wanted to give my c drive more space for the system files. 2. I wanted the deleted file it goes its own drive. It can be easier for me to identify where the file was originally later on.

    The size of my partitions/logical drives and recycle bin folders are listed as the follows.

    C: 604   GB   48,391 MB
    D:  25.5 GB    2,620 MB
    E:  99.9 GB    7,167 MB
    F: 199   GB   12,287 MB 

    Please let me know what I should do. Thanks.


    cy

    Wednesday, January 7, 2015 5:15 PM
  • The deleted file will always go to the local drive's hidden recycle bin. If you open the actual Recycle bin it will display what is in all recycle bins in all drives and I think that it what is confusing you.

    Are you checking all $RECYCLE.BIN folders on each drive for size changes when you delete something or are you just clicking the General Recycle bin on your desktop? I am just concerned that you may be misinterpreting what you are seeing. A good test would be to perform the exact same test thatDuWuNewfolder performed.

    Wednesday, January 7, 2015 5:30 PM
  • Hi Mikee,

    This is what I did. I checked the check box on "Hide protected operating system files".

    There were no recycle bin folders on C, E, F besides D drive. I clicked on D drive. I saw the message from HP about the recovery partition warning.

    I unchecked the check box and deleted a file from my F drive. I saw the deleted file in all recycle bin folders on C, E, F as the follows.

    I removed the image for E and F drive due to exceeding the limit. Should I do more? Any thought?  


    cy

    Wednesday, January 7, 2015 7:54 PM
  • Hi Mikee, I did more tests. I deleted a file from a folder on my F drive. Whatever you said "The deleted file will always go to the local drive's hidden recycle bin. If you open the actual Recycle bin it will display what is in all recycle bins in all drives and I think that it what is confusing you.". The deleted file was shown in all recycle bin folders. I don't know it is as you said. It will display in all recycle bins. There is no way to tell me the deleted file showing in recycle bin on C drive is the deleted file from my F drive. The funny thing was the deleted file went back to F drive when I clicked on the deleted file in the recycle bin on my C drive then I selected "Restore". It seems to me that the deleted file went to all recycle bins not just only display. By the way, the size of all recycle bins didn't change at all. I removed the size of recycle bin on my F drive. The system put 1 mb back. I looked at the size before delete and after delete. It was always the same 1 mb. Any thoughts?

    cy


    • Edited by ChingH Thursday, January 8, 2015 2:57 AM spellig
    Wednesday, January 7, 2015 11:26 PM
  • Hi Mikee, I did more tests. I deleted a file from a folder on my F drive. Whatever you said "The deleted file will always go to the local drive's hidden recycle bin. If you open the actual Recycle bin it will display what is in all recycle bins in all drives and I think that it what is confusing you.". The deleted file was shown in all recycle bin folders. I don't know it is as you said. It will display in all recycle bins. There is no way to tell me the deleted file showing in recycle bin on C drive is the deleted file from my F drive. The funny thing was the deleted file went back to F drive when I clicked on the deleted file in the recycle bin on my C drive then I selected "Restore". It seems to me that the deleted file went to all recycle bins not just only display. By the way, the size of all recycle bins didn't change at all. I removed the size of recycle bin on my F drive. The system put 1 mb back. I looked at the size before delete and after delete. It was always the same 1 mb. Any thoughts?

    cy


    Hi Mikee,

    Maybe, you are right. I know that most of people use one drive for all. They don't have logical drives or partitions.

    Anyway, I did more tests on the same scenario. I looked at the recycle bin in Disk Cleanup on my F drive. The size of the deleted file from my F drive was correct. The rest of recycle bins on C, D, E were 0 bytes. But, there is still something wrong here. Do you agree?

    I tested the same case on my XP, Windows 7, and Windows 8.1 machines. You added subdirectory recycle bin under $RECYCLE:BIN after Windows 7 which is good. But, you removed the warning message "Are you sure you want to move this file to the Recycle Bin?" in Windows 8.1 when we want to delete files or folders. Personally, I thought it is dangerous. It is very easy to create a lot of duplicated files sometimes we don't realize when we drag files and folders in File Explorer now days. Please take this into your consideration. Thanks.


    cy

    Thursday, January 8, 2015 11:30 PM
  • Hi ChingH,

    In fact As Mikke mentioned, the deleted file will always go to their own drive's hidden recycle bin and takes their own drive space, even when you open every recycle bin folder, they all show you same things. Every recycle bin folder in their own drive is separated from others actually.

    To confirm that you could perform following test:

    Set your recycle bin in C custom size to 0

    Create a big size file in c, not too big, in my case: 700mb size dump file.

    Set your recycle bin in other drive too 1000 (bigger than your test file).

    Empty your recycle bin for good measure.

    Put you test file to C, then try to delete it.

    It will give you a “this file is too big to recycle“ even the recycle bin folder in other drive has enough space for it.

    For your needs which is confirm that where the deleted file come from, you could right click in recycle bin and group by location

    Regards

    • Proposed as answer by Deason Wu Wednesday, January 14, 2015 1:20 AM
    Friday, January 9, 2015 2:56 AM
  • Hi DiWu, Impressive. Your explanation implies that this is an NP complete or your Logic 101 is an NP complete. I will do the tests next Tuesday and let you know. Thank you for letting me know I can group the deleted file by location.

    cy

    Friday, January 9, 2015 6:18 PM
  • Hi DiWu,

    OK. I did more tests on your test case plus mine. Yes. You are correct. The deleted file went to its own recycle bin. I also found out that the original location was shown if we looked at the deleted file in each recycle bin with details view. It is much helpful. My only concern is that why each recycle bin shows all deleted files and also each recycle bin only cleans up its own deleted file if we clean up the deleted file in Disk Cleanup. Any explanation will be helpful but it is not necessary. Thanks. 


    cy

    • Marked as answer by ChingH Tuesday, January 13, 2015 11:27 PM
    Tuesday, January 13, 2015 11:27 PM
  • Hi ChingH,

    I just say that for me personally, I don’t want to see two or more recycle bins on my desktop. And when I delete files or move them back from recycle bin, I’d like finish that without taking time. (It takes time when you move file from one partition to another). So the recycle bin is designed as hidden folders and showing all contents, it will give an image that there is only one recycle bin and it is easier to use for most of users.

    Regards


    • Edited by Deason Wu Friday, January 16, 2015 1:18 AM
    Thursday, January 15, 2015 9:53 AM
  • Hi DiWu,

    I understand your point. You don't want to see two or more recycle bins showing on the desktop. I also know that a lot of people use desktop mainly. But, it is not necessary to have two or more recycle bins showing on the desktop. The current design of the recycle bin makes people confused from the file management point of view. The window Explorer, a new term file explorer is used in Windows 8.1 has only one icon/image which lists all logical drives, folders, and files. We are used to look for drives, folders, and files. I am not sure why these two have two different design.

    I did another test. I copied a file to the root folder on E drive. The deleted file went to the subfolder, Recycle Bin under $RECYCLE.BIN after I deleted the file which is good. I right clicked on the sub folder, Recycle Bin and renamed it to EDrive. I double checked the recycle bin on C drive. I saw the deleted file with E:\ on the original Location. But, the subfolder name EDrive was changed back to Recycle Bin on E drive when I came back to look at the E drive. I am not sure how you group the files by location you mentioned above.

    Anyway, your answer was marked as answer. Thanks.

    cy

    Tuesday, January 27, 2015 8:17 PM
  • Hi ChingH,

    Thanks for your feedback, we glad to help you and hear user’s voices.

    I did same test turns out you are right at this one, I suppose this folder is owned by system and system won’t allow user to take the ownership.

    I understand your point, it does make people confused if they want to know how it works. That is also why we keep changing. We’d like keep Improving Windows components design for better user experience. And user’s feedback is important for us to do that so your advice will be recorded.

    Thanks

    Regards

    Thursday, January 29, 2015 8:22 AM