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Windows Automatic Maintenance Behavior RRS feed

  • Question

  • Thanks in advance for reviewing this post and providing any assistance. I'm trying to get a clear understanding of the Windows Update Client behavior in Windows 10 (and 8.1 for that matter). Testing all of the scenarios is pretty difficult and isn't really giving me reliable, understandable results. I'm looking for consistent update behavior controlled through GPO for Windows 8.1 and 10.

    Requirements:

    • Don’t default to forcibly reboot users without first notifying them interactively
    • Don’t allow users to NEVER reboot to finish updates

    These might sound like conflicting requirements, but we were able to accomplish this with deadlines before. For instance, 14 days after the approval would be a deadline. From what I’m seeing, that doesn’t work any longer.

    Settings are as follows:

    • WSUS: Sync on Sundays at 1:00 AM.
    • WSUS: Auto approve security/critical.
    • Automatic Updates detection frequency (4 hours)
    • Client-side Target (Test): Auto download and schedule install; install during automatic maintenance (enabled); Everyday 3:00 AM
    • Client-side Target (Prod): Auto download and schedule install; install during automatic maintenance (enabled); Friday 3:00 AM
    • No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations (Disabled)

    I'm looking to understand the reboot behavior. We don't want users to regularly be forcibly rebooted, but we don't want them to NEVER reboot to finish installing updates. Scenarios (and my understanding):

    1. Computer is online and no users are logged in - Sunday would sync the new updates. Client would download the update and schedule the install for Friday at 3:00 AM. Friday at 3:00 AM would come around and update would install and reboot to finish installing.

    2. Computer is online and user is logged in – Sunday would sync the new updates. Client would download the update and schedule the install for Friday at 3:00 AM. Friday at 3:00 AM would come and the update would be installed, but no reboot would occur. If the user waits longer than 2 days, automatic maintenance would notify them of a reboot, giving them 15 minutes to reboot.

    3. Computer is not online during the update window - Sunday would sync the new updates. Client would download the update and schedule the install for Friday at 3:00 AM. The user brings their machine in on Friday morning at 8:00 AM, but this isn’t during the maintenance window, so Automatic Maintenance would wait for the next window. The next window is missed each day (because it’s the weekend) and the user comes in on Monday morning at 8:00 AM. It’s over 2 days past the scheduled day, so Automatic Maintenance would force the install and would notify the user of a reboot, giving them 15 minutes to reboot.

    4. User is on vacation for 3 weeks and logged in – User would not be forcibly rebooted until they get back, log in, and can receive an interactive prompt for a reboot happening in 15 minutes.

    Am I understanding all of this correctly? If not, can someone clear things up a bit and provide some references for their answer? Thanks!


    • Edited by Brandon4567 Tuesday, March 15, 2016 12:03 AM
    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 12:02 AM

Answers

  • Hi Brandon,

    Sorry for late reply.

    At first, I apologize for my oversight, in my last reply, I didn’t paste the second link, now, I have edited it.

    Then, I read the paragraph you mentioned again and again, as you said, it doesn’t define a specific number about deadline. but it mentioned a word “pre-defined”, when we make scheduler to restart system, we can choose any time in the next week to restart. If we’d rather restart right away there’s a Restart now button towards the bottom of the screen.

    If computer has been shut down on that scheduled date, computer can’t achieve restart and delay to the next time we start computer, then give us a notification.

    About the days you pay attention to, I think it is related to that scheduler date, if today is the scheduler date, it is 1 day, if tomorrow is scheduler date, it is two day, once beyond scheduler days, we need to face restart dialog.

    In a word, we can’t prevent Windows updating, once it started, it downloaded and installed automatically, what we can do is choosing when it automatic restart.

    Maybe my explanation is not very clear, please refer to this blog for more understanding, this blog is written by Microsoft Update Product Team.

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/mu/archive/2008/10/02/windows-update-and-automatic-reboots.aspx

    Best regards.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Monday, March 21, 2016 8:55 AM

All replies

  • Hi Brandon,

    Your line of thought is basically correct.

    However, according to the content of your post, you prefer to talk about Windows 8 system’s update behavior rather than Windows 10.

    About Automatic Maintenance, it is designed to run in the background with limited user interaction and minimal impact to performance and energy efficiency.

    The goal of Automatic Maintenance is to combine all background maintenance activity in Windows and help third-party developers add their maintenance activity to Windows without negatively impacting performance and energy efficiency. For more information, please refer to this link below.

    https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/hh848037%28v=vs.85%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

    In fact, in your scenario, Automatic Maintenance is aimed at Windows 8 update, for Windows 10, update feature has a big change. For your users, those Windows 10 machine will install updates automatically, but users can choose when to reboot system. There is a documentation can help you to understand it.

    http://www.howtogeek.com/223068/what-you-need-to-know-about-windows-update-on-windows-10/

    Please Note: Since the website is not hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    Best regards,

    Teemo Tang


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.



    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 2:34 AM
  • Hey Teemo Tang,

    Thanks for the reply. I'm in the middle of reading the MSDN you linked, but had an initial question. Are you saying that 8.1 and 10 don't use Automatic Maintenance or are somehow different in regards to the Windows Update Client?

    Brandon

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 2:37 AM
  • Hey Teemo Tang,

    I finished reading the article and I can't seem to find any specific answers about what "behind schedule" means or "behind deadline" means, specifically, in regards to the Windows Update Client. The article states this:

    "If critical tasks have not been able to run within their designated time, Automatic Maintenance will automatically start executing at the next available system idle opportunity. However, if the task state remains behind deadline, Automatic Maintenance will notify the user about the activity and provide an option for a manual run of Automatic Maintenance."

    I'm trying to understand what that means in practical terms. Is it 1 day, 2 days? Is it 2 days and then force install and 2 more days before forced reboot? I have already started to see clients being forced to reboot, but I'm not seeing much consistency there in terms of how long they have to complete the scheduled maintenance tasks.

    Brandon


    • Edited by Brandon4567 Wednesday, March 16, 2016 3:34 PM
    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 3:26 AM
  • Hi Brandon,

    Sorry for late reply.

    At first, I apologize for my oversight, in my last reply, I didn’t paste the second link, now, I have edited it.

    Then, I read the paragraph you mentioned again and again, as you said, it doesn’t define a specific number about deadline. but it mentioned a word “pre-defined”, when we make scheduler to restart system, we can choose any time in the next week to restart. If we’d rather restart right away there’s a Restart now button towards the bottom of the screen.

    If computer has been shut down on that scheduled date, computer can’t achieve restart and delay to the next time we start computer, then give us a notification.

    About the days you pay attention to, I think it is related to that scheduler date, if today is the scheduler date, it is 1 day, if tomorrow is scheduler date, it is two day, once beyond scheduler days, we need to face restart dialog.

    In a word, we can’t prevent Windows updating, once it started, it downloaded and installed automatically, what we can do is choosing when it automatic restart.

    Maybe my explanation is not very clear, please refer to this blog for more understanding, this blog is written by Microsoft Update Product Team.

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/mu/archive/2008/10/02/windows-update-and-automatic-reboots.aspx

    Best regards.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Monday, March 21, 2016 8:55 AM