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Add a user defined item to Start "All Programs"? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is it possible to add a folder, or shortcut to a folder, which contains links and sub-folders, to the Start Menu "All Programs", such that I can build my own personal menu of whatever I want, and have it behave and open like the other items in "All Programs"?

    I am currently using folder added as a toolbar, but I would like to eliminate the cascade effect when I click on sub-folders.  I would prefer that it behave like the items under "All Programs", and would prefer to have it there rather than a toolbar.

    More specifically, adding your own folder and menu info in C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs

    However, rather than actually adding a folder to C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs, create a link to a folder structure that exists in another directory or on another drive (a shortcut will not work as intended).

    If not possible, it would be a nice option.

    Doc
    • Edited by Dr. Strangelove Saturday, September 19, 2009 11:55 AM more info
    • Moved by Carey FrischMVP Saturday, September 19, 2009 2:23 PM Moved to relevant category (From:Windows 7 Miscellaneous)
    Saturday, September 19, 2009 10:31 AM

Answers

  • Ok.  But, before I try this, I want to understand this:

    MKLINK [[/D] | [/H] | [/J]] Link Target

            /D      Creates a directory symbolic link.  Default is a file
                    symbolic link.
            /H      Creates a hard link instead of a symbolic link.
            /J      Creates a Directory Junction.
            Link    specifies the new symbolic link name.
            Target  specifies the path (relative or absolute) that the new link
                    refers to.


    So, in C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs, I want to create a link with MKLINK to a folder structure that exists on another drive.

    Should it be /D, or /H, or /J

    And, how does one remove such a link at a later time?

    Doc


    Edit:  Well, nothing ventured, nothing gained.  I tried it with the /D and voila - it works perfectly.

    Still not sure about the differences between D, H, and J.   But what I wanted works.  Now, instead of having my own "menu" as a toolbar that cascades, I have added my folder structure as above using MKLINK.  To try this yourself, run CMD as administrator.

    Doc

    Sunday, September 20, 2009 8:52 AM

All replies

  • Why don't you give it a try it and see for yourself?
    Sunday, September 20, 2009 5:55 AM
  • Ok.  But, before I try this, I want to understand this:

    MKLINK [[/D] | [/H] | [/J]] Link Target

            /D      Creates a directory symbolic link.  Default is a file
                    symbolic link.
            /H      Creates a hard link instead of a symbolic link.
            /J      Creates a Directory Junction.
            Link    specifies the new symbolic link name.
            Target  specifies the path (relative or absolute) that the new link
                    refers to.


    So, in C:\ProgramData\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs, I want to create a link with MKLINK to a folder structure that exists on another drive.

    Should it be /D, or /H, or /J

    And, how does one remove such a link at a later time?

    Doc


    Edit:  Well, nothing ventured, nothing gained.  I tried it with the /D and voila - it works perfectly.

    Still not sure about the differences between D, H, and J.   But what I wanted works.  Now, instead of having my own "menu" as a toolbar that cascades, I have added my folder structure as above using MKLINK.  To try this yourself, run CMD as administrator.

    Doc

    Sunday, September 20, 2009 8:52 AM
  • Hi,

    Thanks for sharing your experience.

    Based on my research, I would like to share the following article with you on the difference between MKLINK /D,  /H and  /J.

    MKLINK in Windows

    Difference between symbolic link and hard link

    Note: we provide this website for references, Microsoft doesn't control and guarantee any changes in this website.

    Best Regards.
    Dale Qiao
    Monday, September 21, 2009 7:02 AM
  • Hi Doc

    Thanks for posting this procedure.

    Regarding your question about "how does one remove such a link at a later time", you can simply delete the Symbolic Link in the Start/All Programs menu. In this respect, a symlink or junction works just like a normal shortcut.

    Regards,

    Thank You for using Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Monday, September 21, 2009 9:17 PM
  • Thanks, Ronnie and Dale.

    Yes, I did try a simple delete and it worked as it should.

    Kind of nice having a "personal" menu on the Start Menu that does not cascade like when the same "personal" menu is set as a toolbar.

    Doc
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 5:40 AM