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IE 10 problem with .tr5 file extension RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am having a problem with IE 10 attempting to open a link in a webpage, where it links to a file with extension .tr5. I have found out that his happens even when I create a simple html file and have the link to the file in there, so for example I use this html file:

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <body>

    <a href="http://xxx.xxx.xxx/__data/assets/file/0006/1104/Corporate-Organisation-and-Management-Communications-Organisational-Charts-Headquarters-HQ.tr5">
    This is a link</a>

    </body>
    </html>

    What happens is that this link is always opening inside IE and I see the contents of this .tr5 file as text, where as I used to see the download prompt on IE 8, and I still see the download prompt on IE 10 through compatibility mode. Interestingly firefox also has the problem where it is opening the content of .tr5 file in the browser itself as text.

    The .tr5 file extension itself is set to open with TrimDesktop.exe which is expected, and .tr5 files do open with the correct program. Also, if I were to right click the link to a tr5 file inside IE 10 and choose "save target as", I am allowed to download the file.

    As an experiment, I altered the a href link above to point to a new file I made with .xxx extension, and this time I was prompted to download. So it appears that IE10 and firefox are deliberately trying to open these tr5 files within themselves.

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014 3:48 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Hi,

    Do you mean that when you click a link which points to a .tr5 file, then it will automatically open the file with in IE instead of a download prompt and this issue is especially occurred to the .tr5 file?

    Does this occurred in all websites or only this particular website?

    Some websites give users instructions on how to bypass the acceptance prompt for their downloads,   like this

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ie/jj542450(v=vs.85).aspx

    once you cleard the option of "Always ask before opening this type of file", then you will be unable to see the prompt.

    If in this case, you need to do a registry change, see this link

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/ie/forum/ie8-windows_other/ie-7on-downloading-files-option-to-save-asopen/9ee22c03-8fc3-4225-9bde-ee0e8e3c0fe9?auth=1

    If you're a web developer and website is built by yourself, then you might need help in this forum

    IE Web Development Forum

    https://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/ie/en-US/home?category=iedevelopment


    Yolanda Zhu
    TechNet Community Support

    Thursday, March 27, 2014 7:52 AM
    Moderator
  • When I click the link to the .tr5 file, IE10 opens it within itself and as a result all I see is text, so it looks like this:

    This is actually the file contents. This .tr5 file is meant to be opened in TrimDesktop.exe. As I have mentioned before, simply double left clicking on a .tr5 file that is already saved somewhere will open fine in TrimDesktop.exe.

    Also, as mentioned before, I created a very simple .html file (code in my above post) that has nothing but one href link to a .tr5 file. That also opens up within IE10 rather than prompting me to download. Same happens with firefox. I did not untick the "always ask before opening this type of file", infact I never even got the box when left clicking on the link.

    Right clicking on the link and choosing "save target as" does prompt me to save or open the file. As mentioned IE10 in compatibility mode also works fine.

    Thursday, March 27, 2014 10:24 AM
  • What is the result if you uninstall the TrimDesktop.exe, then reset IE to it's default setting, test this issue again?

    Or you can share a download link with me, I have IE 10 installed in my system, let me check if I have the same result as yours.

    If we have the same result, then it possibly a bug, we should contact related developer forum.

    Monday, March 31, 2014 9:01 AM
  • Tuesday, April 1, 2014 4:19 AM
    Answerer
  • in your other thread (in the iewebdev forum, where Robert is referring), Eric has suggested you examine the content headers and MIME-types on the webserver, which is exactly what I was about to suggest to you.

    If the webserver is sending a MIME-type of something like plain/text, the client browser is doing exactly what's it's being told to do...


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    Tuesday, April 1, 2014 6:04 AM