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dual boot Windows 7 & Vista RRS feed

  • Question

  • I previously had Vista installed on my hard drive. I then disconnected this drive, and installed Windows 7 on a second drive.

    My intention was to be able to dual boot and keep Vista until I had transferred the old disks's contents across.

    I now realise I should have had both drives connected when I installed Win 7 to have the dual boot option available.

    So now I can't dual boot and have to disconnect the new drive to access my old drive via Vista.

    I've got the EasyBCD and Boot-US utilities & have purchased Dual Boot Pro, but I'm not sure how to use them, or if I should try any of them.

    I've also read that I can load a Win 7 repair disk and boot off it, and that will then identify both Win7 and Vista in 'Boot Manager'. Will this allow me to dual boot? Presumably this doesn't reformat the new (Win7) disk so the stuff I've already loaded will be OK.

    I suppose my last resort is to reinstall Win 7 on the new drive with both drives connected, but I don't want to have to reformat the new drive.

    Please advise me what route I should go and what specific steps I should take to enable dual booting.

    Thursday, December 30, 2010 10:56 PM

Answers

  • You're correct, you should be able to run the windows 7 install disk and boot from it, and then select the "repair my windows" (or something similar, sorry don't remember the exact wording, it's the button on the lower left). In most cases it will fix your boot configuration data according to the operating systems it finds, add the necessary boot entries to the BCD so you can choose what to boot from.

    I have not heard from Boot-US, and I personally would not resort to buying a 3rd party program unless I've tried all the other options first. I've tried EasyBCD in the past before, it seems to be pretty straight forward on how to use and if the option one doesn't work, I suggest to use this tool first before any of the others.

    If nothing works, it's still possible to configure it manually by using the command line tools bcdboot and bcdedit from the windows 7 install disk, but I suggest you try the easier methods first.

    Kind regards,

    Stephan Schwarz.


    If you one of these posts answered your question or issue, please click on "Mark as answer". If a post contained helpfull information, please be so kind to click on the "Vote as helpful" button :)
    • Marked as answer by wimiki Saturday, January 1, 2011 3:11 AM
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 11:11 PM
  • If you just want to transfer information you do not need to dual boot.

    Connect both drives, set the drive with Windows 7 as the primary boot drive in the motherboard BIOS and boot up. You will be able to take ownership of the Vista drive and transfer the files you need.

    If your motherboard has a boot menu option at boot time, you can override the default boot drive setting in the BIOS and boot to Vista if you really want.

    • Marked as answer by wimiki Saturday, January 1, 2011 3:11 AM
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 11:29 PM
  • EasyBCD can create the dual boot menu that the Windows 7 install would have created if you had opted to install Windows 7 in a separate partition.

    The menu is presented after the BIOS has finished and is ready to start loading an operating system. You can set whichever version of Windows you prefer as the default.

    • Marked as answer by Miya Yao Friday, January 7, 2011 8:50 AM
    Monday, January 3, 2011 9:34 AM

All replies

  • You're correct, you should be able to run the windows 7 install disk and boot from it, and then select the "repair my windows" (or something similar, sorry don't remember the exact wording, it's the button on the lower left). In most cases it will fix your boot configuration data according to the operating systems it finds, add the necessary boot entries to the BCD so you can choose what to boot from.

    I have not heard from Boot-US, and I personally would not resort to buying a 3rd party program unless I've tried all the other options first. I've tried EasyBCD in the past before, it seems to be pretty straight forward on how to use and if the option one doesn't work, I suggest to use this tool first before any of the others.

    If nothing works, it's still possible to configure it manually by using the command line tools bcdboot and bcdedit from the windows 7 install disk, but I suggest you try the easier methods first.

    Kind regards,

    Stephan Schwarz.


    If you one of these posts answered your question or issue, please click on "Mark as answer". If a post contained helpfull information, please be so kind to click on the "Vote as helpful" button :)
    • Marked as answer by wimiki Saturday, January 1, 2011 3:11 AM
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 11:11 PM
  • If you just want to transfer information you do not need to dual boot.

    Connect both drives, set the drive with Windows 7 as the primary boot drive in the motherboard BIOS and boot up. You will be able to take ownership of the Vista drive and transfer the files you need.

    If your motherboard has a boot menu option at boot time, you can override the default boot drive setting in the BIOS and boot to Vista if you really want.

    • Marked as answer by wimiki Saturday, January 1, 2011 3:11 AM
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 11:29 PM
  • Thanks for your help.  I noted your confirmation that running the repair option off the Win 7 install disk would fix the configuration problem. I then ran the repair option and it worked like a charm. Now when I boot the PC the BIOS gives me the choice of which OS I want to use.

    Does EasyBCD give you another way of selecting the O,S or do you always have to do that via the BIOS startup?

    Regards.

     

     

    Monday, January 3, 2011 12:03 AM
  • EasyBCD can create the dual boot menu that the Windows 7 install would have created if you had opted to install Windows 7 in a separate partition.

    The menu is presented after the BIOS has finished and is ready to start loading an operating system. You can set whichever version of Windows you prefer as the default.

    • Marked as answer by Miya Yao Friday, January 7, 2011 8:50 AM
    Monday, January 3, 2011 9:34 AM
  • Thanks for your help.  I noted your confirmation that running the repair option off the Win 7 install disk would fix the configuration problem. I then ran the repair option and it worked like a charm. Now when I boot the PC the BIOS gives me the choice of which OS I want to use.

    Does EasyBCD give you another way of selecting the O,S or do you always have to do that via the BIOS startup?

    Regards.

     

     


    The result is exactly the same as you are seeing currently whether you use EasyBCD or not :). All that program does is create a nice GUI for the tools bcdboot and bcdedit, which the windows repair option also uses for that same matter.
    If you one of these posts answered your question or issue, please click on "Mark as answer". If a post contained helpfull information, please be so kind to click on the "Vote as helpful" button :)
    Monday, January 3, 2011 12:12 PM