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Architecting DR for Azure and AWS RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dear Team,

    I got request from one of my client that he wants to enable DR services for his Azure instances to AWS and Vice-a-versa. So can you guide me is it possible and is there any document about architecture and implementation about the same.


    Kunal Rane

    Wednesday, October 5, 2016 5:21 AM

Answers

  • Hi Kunal, Azure Site Recovery would be a good option to implement a DR option from AWS to Azure. This could be achieved by considering the AWS' virtual machine as physical servers and replicate/protect them in Azure. The following article goes a little more in depth on how to achieve this:
    https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/site-recovery-vmware-to-azure/
    In regards to the other way around (Azure to AWS), to my knowledge neither Microsoft or Amazon offers this capability today (I could be wrong though), so in order to achieve this you would need to look at third party applications such as Zerto or Double Take, but unfortunately, those comes with an fairly high licensing cost, which might render their use prohibitive.

    Hope this helps, Stephane


    • Edited by _Stephane_MVP Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:21 AM formating
    • Marked as answer by Kunal Rane Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:32 AM
    Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:20 AM
  • Hi Kunal,

    As I mentioned, you could use something like Zerto or Double take.

    Another, cheaper option (but not really DR), would be to utilise Data Protection Manager to backup the primary Azure site, then replicate this data (via Data Protection Manager) to a secondary backup server located in AWS (Running in a VM). If something went wrong with the primary site, you could then do a restore from Data Protection Manager in AWS within each created VM.

    I'm not a big fan of the above solution as it is not a true DR solution and is not an extendable solution (you would be very limited in the amount of data and the number of VMs you need replication for, and the time to restore would have to be taken in consideration).

    My recommended option would be to forget about AWS :-) and make use of the Azure geo-redundancy, which ensures that, if the datacentre where your VMs are located is going down, your VMs can be brought back up in another datacentre.


    Hope this helps, Stephane

    • Marked as answer by Kunal Rane Thursday, October 6, 2016 9:42 AM
    Thursday, October 6, 2016 8:21 AM

All replies

  • Hi Kunal, Azure Site Recovery would be a good option to implement a DR option from AWS to Azure. This could be achieved by considering the AWS' virtual machine as physical servers and replicate/protect them in Azure. The following article goes a little more in depth on how to achieve this:
    https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/documentation/articles/site-recovery-vmware-to-azure/
    In regards to the other way around (Azure to AWS), to my knowledge neither Microsoft or Amazon offers this capability today (I could be wrong though), so in order to achieve this you would need to look at third party applications such as Zerto or Double Take, but unfortunately, those comes with an fairly high licensing cost, which might render their use prohibitive.

    Hope this helps, Stephane


    • Edited by _Stephane_MVP Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:21 AM formating
    • Marked as answer by Kunal Rane Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:32 AM
    Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:20 AM
  • Thank you very Stephane..

    I feel that will really support me.

    Still if you guys got any information regarding this, please let me know..


    Kunal Rane

    Wednesday, October 5, 2016 10:32 AM
  • Stephane..

    can you suggest me some more third party softwares which can be utilised for azure vm to AWS as DR. Customer dont want real time replication, and high availability between the two. he can manage downtime of 2-4 hours. 


    Kunal Rane

    Thursday, October 6, 2016 5:35 AM
  • Hi Kunal,

    As I mentioned, you could use something like Zerto or Double take.

    Another, cheaper option (but not really DR), would be to utilise Data Protection Manager to backup the primary Azure site, then replicate this data (via Data Protection Manager) to a secondary backup server located in AWS (Running in a VM). If something went wrong with the primary site, you could then do a restore from Data Protection Manager in AWS within each created VM.

    I'm not a big fan of the above solution as it is not a true DR solution and is not an extendable solution (you would be very limited in the amount of data and the number of VMs you need replication for, and the time to restore would have to be taken in consideration).

    My recommended option would be to forget about AWS :-) and make use of the Azure geo-redundancy, which ensures that, if the datacentre where your VMs are located is going down, your VMs can be brought back up in another datacentre.


    Hope this helps, Stephane

    • Marked as answer by Kunal Rane Thursday, October 6, 2016 9:42 AM
    Thursday, October 6, 2016 8:21 AM