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MDT formated second partition instead of first one RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    I have diskpart script in preinstallation task sequence

    SELECT disk 0
    SELECT partition 1
    FORMAT FS=NTFS LABEL="System" QUICK
    EXIT

    And I have "Install Operating System" step configured to install OS on first disk and first partition.

    Everything works great, but there are some old WinXP computers that have OS files on disk C: and boot files on disk D:

    So, the second partition has boot files and is being active. MDT wizard wiped out this partition and installed OS there. Why?
    How to prevent it?

    Friday, March 13, 2015 4:03 AM

Answers

  • If you need to persist the partition information during a deployment using the client.xml task sequence, then the best way to do this is to simply perform a "refresh", that will allow MDT to migrage files and settings (optional) and persist the partition configuration.

    Otherwise, MDT is designed to repartition disk 0 during a new computer installation. Any attempt to bypass the format and partition disk step with your own process is not supported.


    Keith Garner - Principal Consultant [owner] - http://DeploymentLive.com

    Monday, March 16, 2015 7:24 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Generally, I don't recommend having multiple partitions (other than the Bitlocker or uEFI partitions).

    IT's possible that your C: drive *IS* the second partition.

    If you install the OS on the second partition, Windows will call it C:.

    Run diskmgmt.msc to verify.


    Keith Garner - Principal Consultant [owner] - http://DeploymentLive.com

    Friday, March 13, 2015 5:59 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello, aldarik.

    Why you do not format whole disk with Format and Partition Disk phase? Do you want to preserve second volume?

    Friday, March 13, 2015 8:27 AM
  • Thank for replies.

    Keith Garner, my C: drive is my first partition for sure. Let me explain little bit more.

    What I had before:
    two partitions/volumes: 
    1st partition according to diskpart -- Volume C: -- 200GB size -- OS files (Windows, Program Files, etc.)
    2nd partition according to diskpart -- Volume D: -- 260Gb size -- Boot files (ntldr, boot.ini, etc) -- Active

    What I have after:
    1st partition -- Volume C: -- 200GB -- no files (seems to be formatted)
    2nd partition -- Volume D: -- 260GB -- old data is deleted, only new OS files (Windows, Program Files, etc) -- --- still Active

    fapw, yes I want to preserve second volume. And actually I do it. It works great except some old computers, that were prepared many years ago with boot files on the second partition.

    Friday, March 13, 2015 11:43 AM
  • Thank for replies.

    Keith Garner, my C: drive is my first partition for sure. Let me explain little bit more.

    What I had before:
    two partitions/volumes: 
    1st partition according to diskpart -- Volume C: -- 200GB size -- OS files (Windows, Program Files, etc.)
    2nd partition according to diskpart -- Volume D: -- 260Gb size -- Boot files (ntldr, boot.ini, etc) -- Active

    What I have after:
    1st partition -- Volume C: -- 200GB -- no files (seems to be formatted)
    2nd partition -- Volume D: -- 260GB -- old data is deleted, only new OS files (Windows, Program Files, etc) -- --- still Active

    fapw, yes I want to preserve second volume. And actually I do it. It works great except some old computers, that were prepared many years ago with boot files on the second partition.


    Unless you explicitly say to not create extra partitions your OSDisk is not the first partition.

    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

    Saturday, March 14, 2015 12:10 AM
    Moderator
  • Ty Glander, sorry but I don't undersand. Could you please explain with details?

    Saturday, March 14, 2015 2:25 AM
  • If you need to persist the partition information during a deployment using the client.xml task sequence, then the best way to do this is to simply perform a "refresh", that will allow MDT to migrage files and settings (optional) and persist the partition configuration.

    Otherwise, MDT is designed to repartition disk 0 during a new computer installation. Any attempt to bypass the format and partition disk step with your own process is not supported.


    Keith Garner - Principal Consultant [owner] - http://DeploymentLive.com

    Monday, March 16, 2015 7:24 PM
    Moderator