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RAID Drive Issue

    Question

  • Hello,

    What is the maximum capacity of drives to be used in different types of raids.

    Thanks & Regards,

    Shashank Saxena


    shashank saxena

    Saturday, April 08, 2017 10:58 AM

All replies

  • Sunday, April 09, 2017 4:34 AM
  • No where is available the perfect answer.

    shashank saxena

    Monday, April 10, 2017 5:51 PM
  • No where is available the perfect answer.

    shashank saxena

    Monday, April 10, 2017 5:51 PM
  • Currently I am using several computers that are in RAID 0.

    They have 750 GB internal hard drive that works with 32 GB flash cache.

    There is no storage on the 32 GB flash cache.  It is there to improve the performance in handling data.

    I use the intel software Intel Rapid Storage Technology on all of my computer to check the status of the drives.

    If you move a drive from one computer to the other, for example primary bay to secondary bay the drive could be unavailable or incompatible.  This information would not be seen in disk management, device manager, or file explorer.

    The drive would be seen in the bios and with the Intel software.

    So for RAID 0 there was no issue with capacity.  There may be issues with other levels of RAID.  If you move drives from one computer to another then you would want to know about the benefit of the software when the operating system cannot detect the drive (disk management, device manager, file explorer.)

    https://1drv.ms/i/s!AhdfDD74t_q2jRa90VMU0dbxS6tD

    https://1drv.ms/i/s!AhdfDD74t_q2jRcIFdxCXUk3rKQn

    Monday, April 10, 2017 6:27 PM
  • Hello Dave,

    I already asked my query in both the forum you given.

    Thanks & Regards,

    Shashank Saxena


    shashank saxena

    Tuesday, April 11, 2017 5:00 AM
  • Check out the Intel Rapid Storage Technology Software if you have not already used it:

    RAID-enabled systems
    Redundant Array of Independent Drives (RAID) refers to multiple independent disks combined to form one logical drive. The main objective of this technology is to improve storage system performance, data protection, and increase fault tolerance.
    This technology provides support for the following features:
    ■ Intel® Rapid RAID
    This technology provides the ability to create RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 10 volumes on desktop and mobile platforms. Data is distributed across two or more disks to provide data redundancy or to enhance data storage performance.
    ■ Intel® Matrix RAID Technology
    This technology allows two independent RAID volumes to be created on a single array. The first volume occupies part of the array, leaving space for the second volume.  The array may consist of two to six disks depending on the volume types.
    ■ Native Command Queuing (NCQ)
    NCQ is a feature that allows disks to accept more than one command at a time. When used in conjunction with one or more disks that support NCQ, storage performance is increased on random workloads by allowing the disk to optimize internally the order of commands.
    ■ Hot plug
    Also referred to as hot swap, this feature allows disks to be removed or inserted while the computer is turned on and the operating system is running. As an example, hot plugging may be used to replace a failed external disk.
    ■ Disk capacity greater than two terabytes (2 TB)
    This feature provides support for hard disks and solid-state drives with a capacity greater than 2 TB that are reported as pass-through devices (available) or used in a RAID configuration.
     

    ■ Volume size increase
    This feature allows you to increase the data storage capacity of a volume by using 100% of the available array space or by adding one or more disks to an existing volume.

    There is lots of information available on the software

    Depending on the controller installed and the hardware connected to your system, some volume types may not be enabled in the selection list. Refer to the Readme file located in the Program Files directory for this application or to the Device Manager to determine which controller is installed on your computer. Review the controller support table below to determine which volume types you can create.
     
    Volume type Number of disks Controller support
    Recovery volume 2 ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH9M, ICH9M-E, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
     
    RAID 0 2 ICH7R, ICH7DH, ICH7MDH, ICH7M, ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH9M, ICH9M-E, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
    RAID 0 3 or 4 ICH7R, ICH7DH, ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
    RAID 0 5 or 6 ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
    RAID 1 2 ICH7R, ICH7DH, ICH7MDH, ICH7M, ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH9M, ICH9M-E, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
    RAID 5 3 or 4 ICH7R, ICH7DH, ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
    RAID 5 5 or 6 ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.
    RAID 10 4 ICH7R, ICH7DH, ICH9R, ICH9DH, ICH9DO, ICH10R, ICH10D, ICH10DO, 5 Series/3400 Series.

     RAID 0:
    A RAID type or configuration where data is striped across multiple physical disks. Data is split into manageable blocks called strips across array members. Striping does not create data redundancy but improves read/write performance.
     RAID 1:
    A RAID type or configuration where data is mirrored across a second physical disk in the array. Mirroring is a key feature that ensures real-time data redundancy and increased fault tolerance. There is no striping.
     RAID 10:
    A RAID type or configuration that uses four disks to create a combination of RAID types 0 and 1. The data is striped across a two-disk array forming a RAID 0 component. Each of the disks in the RAID 0 array is mirrored by a disk in the RAID 1 array.
     RAID 5:
    A RAID type or configuration where data and parity are striped into manageable blocks called stripes across three or more physical disks. This type is a preferred configuration as it combines efficiency, fault-tolerance, and data performance.
     RAID:
    Redundant Array of Independent/Inexpensive Disks is a technology used for computer data storage schemes that divide and/or replicate data among multiple disks. RAID can be designed to provide increased data reliability or increased I/O (input/output) performance, or both. A number of standard schemes have evolved which are referred to as levels or types. Intel® Rapid Storage Technology software supports RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, and RAID 10 configurations (refer to each RAID type definition for more information).

    Tuesday, April 11, 2017 5:18 AM
  • Hi,

    Check this table

    More details, read this article:

    Overview of Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/100110/overview-of-redundant-arrays-of-inexpensive-disks-raid


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    Wednesday, April 12, 2017 8:31 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello,

    Thank you for sending me this table but my question is something different. 

    I just want to know the Maximum Hard-Disk that I can use in different Raid. Coz theoretically I know that there is no limit

    Thanks & Regards,

    Shashank Saxena


    shashank saxena

    Thursday, April 13, 2017 10:45 AM
  • Today I asked Intel about your question and their support did not have a chart or data.

    They only had information on speed.

    https://www.softraid.com/images/raid_speeds_chart.png


    They also said for SSD it is infinity.
    Thursday, April 13, 2017 7:33 PM
  • Thank you for helping me so much. That Infinity Hard Disk is true on Theoretical basis but practically it is dependent on LSI Card according to my knowledge. I don't know that is true or not.

    shashank saxena

    Friday, April 14, 2017 4:57 PM
  • Thank you for helping me so much. That Infinity Hard Disk is true on Theoretical basis but practically it is dependent on LSI Card according to my knowledge. I don't know that is true or not.

    shashank saxena

    No obvious limitation. But in fact there no Infinity Hard Disk exists. You could try maximum size of the disk you could purchase

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, April 17, 2017 8:29 AM
    Moderator