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Windows 7 64-bit Blue Screen of Death RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am absolutely clueless about computers.

    Here is what happened just now. I've been getting Bluescreens for a while now, but I did a disk wipe (of the free space) after the last one and I thought it was gone. It appears to happen when I am on Youtube. I also get messages saying my ATI display driver momentarily stopped functioning a lot, but whenever I check for solutions using the Action Center nothing happens.

    Problem signature:
      Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
      OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
      Locale ID: 1033

    Additional information about the problem:
      BCCode: 116
      BCP1: FFFFFA8009EBA010
      BCP2: FFFFF88004234AEC
      BCP3: 0000000000000000
      BCP4: 0000000000000002
      OS Version: 6_1_7601
      Service Pack: 1_0
      Product: 768_1

    Files that help describe the problem:
      C:\Windows\Minidump\021813-24429-01.dmp
      C:\Users\Rebecca\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-214158-0.sysdata.xml

    If it helps, here's another one:

    Problem signature:
      Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
      OS Version: 6.1.7601.2.1.0.768.3
      Locale ID: 1033

    Additional information about the problem:
      BCCode: 3b
      BCP1: 00000000C0000005
      BCP2: 0000000000000000
      BCP3: FFFFF8800C3F0300
      BCP4: 0000000000000000
      OS Version: 6_1_7601
      Service Pack: 1_0
      Product: 768_1

    Files that help describe the problem:
      C:\Windows\Minidump\021313-36941-01.dmp
      C:\Users\Rebecca\AppData\Local\Temp\WER-89996-0.sysdata.xml

    I would be most grateful to any kind of help.

    Monday, February 18, 2013 5:42 PM

Answers

  •  These crashes were caused by memory corruption (probably your AVG).  Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.  

    I would remove and replace the AVG at least to test

    Avast  can be a  contributing cause of BSOD'S . 
    Please remove and replace  with Microsoft Security Essentials AT LEAST TO TEST

    http://files.avast.com/files/eng/aswclear5.exe
    http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials

    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!   If you dont know what this means you probably arent


    1-Memtest.
    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 
    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.
    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.
    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.
    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.


    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.
    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.
    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.
    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    *In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

    Here is the procedure:

    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.
    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.
    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.
    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

    *Further Reading
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617


    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Team ZigZag

    • Marked as answer by Spencer Xi Wednesday, February 27, 2013 4:46 AM
    Monday, February 25, 2013 8:49 PM

All replies

  •  We do need the actual DMP file as it contains the only record of the sequence of events leading up to the crash, what drivers were loaded, and what was responsible.
    You may be able to get the DMP files without crashing by booting into safe mode (F8) with networking.
    If you are overclocking stop.  (chances are if you dont know if you are, you are not)a
    To enable us to assist you with your computer's BSOD symptoms, upload the contents of your "\Windows\Minidump" folder.


    The procedure:

    * Copy the contents of \Windows\Minidump to another (temporary) location somewhere on your machine.
    * Zip up the copy.
    * Attach the ZIP archive to your post using the "paperclip" (file attachments) button. (if available on  your site, MS doesnt have this)
     *Please upload them to a file sharing service like Skydrive or"Rapidshare" and put a link to them in your reply.
    Link for how to  upload below.
    http://www.wikihow.com/Use-SkyDrive

    To ensure minidumps are enabled:

    * Go to Start, in the Search Box type: sysdm.cpl, press Enter.
    * Under the Advanced tab, click on the Startup and Recovery Settings... button.
    * Ensure that Automatically restart is unchecked.
    * Under the Write Debugging Information header select Small memory dump (256 kB) in the dropdown box (the 256kb varies).
    * Ensure that the Small Dump Directory is listed as %systemroot%\Minidump.
    * OK your way out.
    * Reboot if changes have been made.

    Please also run MSinfo32 and upload the output as well.
    To run MSinfo32 please go to start>run>MSinfo32
    Go to "file" "save" and upload the saved file with the DMPS
    (Instructions for XP, Vista, Win 7, Win 8)
    Team Zigzag3143.com

    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Team ZigZag

    Monday, February 18, 2013 7:44 PM
  • My apologies for not being able to reply with the links, apparently my account is not verified yet, and the FAQ hasn't informed me of how to remedy this situtation.
    Monday, February 18, 2013 10:46 PM
  • MB

    You could upload them to either Skydrive or a file sharing service like Rapidshare.  I can tell you this without them.


    "It's not a true crash, in the sense that the Blue Screen was initiated only because the combination of video driver and video hardware was being unresponsive, and not because of any synchronous processing exception".


    Since Vista, the "Timeout Detection and Recovery" (TDR) components of the OS video subsystem have been capable of doing some truly impressive things to try to recover from issues which would have caused earlier OS's like XP to crash.

    As a last resort, the TDR subsystem sends the video driver a "please restart yourself now!" command and waits a few seconds.
    If there's no response, the OS concludes that the video driver/hardware combo has truly collapsed in a heap, and it fires off that stop 0x116 BSOD.


    If playing with video driver versions hasn't helped, make sure the box is not overheating.
     Try removing a side panel and aiming a big mains fan straight at the motherboard and GPU.
     Run it like that for a few hours or days - long enough to ascertain whether cooler temperatures make a difference.


    If so, it might be as simple as dust buildup and subsequently inadequate cooling.

    I would download cpu-z and gpu-z (both free) and keep an eye on the video temps


    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Team ZigZag

    Monday, February 18, 2013 10:49 PM
  • Hi,

    Bug Check 0x3B may occur due to user-mode graphics drivers crossing over and passing bad data to the kernel code. Suggetions is that updating the graphics driver to the latest.

    Aslo you may refer to the solution from the link below about Bug check 0x116 and 0x3b:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff557263(v=vs.85).aspx

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/hardware/ff558949(v=vs.85).aspx

    Regards.


    Spencer
    TechNet Community Support

    Wednesday, February 20, 2013 4:33 AM
  • All right.

    This is the link to the minidump ZIP files. They both obviously have http:// in front of them, but it wouldn't let me put the entire link in and so this will have to do.

    skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=B63339CE8DA7AF23!105&authkey=!APGA3lKehJQFvRo

    And this is the link to the MSinfo32 file.

    skydrive.live.com/redir?resid=B63339CE8DA7AF23!106&authkey=!ABRdukc9xfw7UZc

    I am not intentionally overclocking (if this is what is happening).

    I checked my Event Viewer and it tells me I have 21 instances of an event known as a Kernel Power 41 with Task Category 63 and a bunch of info that looks like this:

    - System
    - Provider
    [
    Name]
    Microsoft-Windows-Kernel-Power
    [
    Guid]
    {331C3B3A-2005-44C2-AC5E-77220C37D6B4}
    EventID 41
    Version 2
    Level 1
    Task 63
    Opcode 0
    Keywords 0x8000000000000002
    - TimeCreated
    [
    SystemTime]
    2013-02-18T17:28:14.590021100Z
    EventRecordID 85466
    Correlation
    - Execution
    [
    ProcessID]
    4
    [
    ThreadID]
    8
    Channel System
    Computer Rebecca-HP
    - Security
    [
    UserID]
    S-1-5-18
    - EventData
    BugcheckCode 278
    BugcheckParameter1 0xfffffa8009eba010
    BugcheckParameter2 0xfffff88004234aec
    BugcheckParameter3 0x0
    BugcheckParameter4 0x2
    SleepInProgress false
    PowerButtonTimestamp

    0


    • Edited by Mawkingbird Sunday, February 24, 2013 5:39 PM
    Sunday, February 24, 2013 5:37 PM
  •  These crashes were caused by memory corruption (probably your AVG).  Please run these two tests to verify your memory and find which driver is causing the problem.  

    I would remove and replace the AVG at least to test

    Avast  can be a  contributing cause of BSOD'S . 
    Please remove and replace  with Microsoft Security Essentials AT LEAST TO TEST

    http://files.avast.com/files/eng/aswclear5.exe
    http://www.microsoft.com/security_essentials

    *Dont forget to upload any further DMP files (especially those when verifier is running)

    *If you are overclocking anything reset to default before running these tests.
    In other words STOP!!!   If you dont know what this means you probably arent


    1-Memtest.
    *Download a copy of Memtest86 and burn the ISO to a CD using Iso Recorder or another ISO burning program. http://www.memtest.org 
    *Boot from the CD, and leave it running for at least 5 or 6 passes.
    *Just remember, any time Memtest reports errors, it can be either bad RAM or a bad motherboard slot.
    *Test the sticks individually, and if you find a good one, test it in all slots.

    Any errors are indicative of a memory problem.
    If a known good stick fails in a motherboard slot it is probably the slot.


    2-Driver verifier

    Using Driver Verifier is an iffy proposition. Most times it'll crash and it'll tell you what the driver is.

    *But sometimes it'll crash and won't tell you the driver.
    *Other times it'll crash before you can log in to Windows. If you can't get to Safe Mode, then you'll have to resort to offline editing of the registry to disable Driver Verifier.
    *I'd suggest that you first backup your data and then make sure you've got access to another computer so you can contact us if problems arise.
    *Then make a System Restore point (so you can restore the system using the Vista/Win7 Startup Repair feature).

    *In Windows 7 you can make a Startup Repair disk by going to Start....All Programs...Maintenance...Create a System Repair Disc - with Windows Vista you'll have to use your installation disk or the "Repair your computer" option at the top of the Safe Mode menu .

    Here is the procedure:

    - Go to Start and type in "verifier" (without the quotes) and press Enter
    - Select "Create custom settings (for code developers)" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select individual settings from a full list" and click "Next"
    - Select everything EXCEPT FOR "Low Resource Simulation" and click "Next"
    - Select "Select driver names from a list" and click "Next"
    *Then select all drivers NOT provided by Microsoft and click "Next"
    - Select "Finish" on the next page.
    *Reboot the system and wait for it to crash to the Blue Screen.
    *Continue to use your system normally, and if you know what causes the crash, do that repeatedly. The objective here is to get the system to crash because Driver Verifier is stressing the drivers out. If it doesn't crash for you, then let it run for at least 36 hours of continuous operation.
    *If you can't get into Windows because it crashes too soon, try it in Safe Mode.
    *If you can't get into Safe Mode, try using System Restore from your installation DVD to set the system back to the previous restore point that you created.

    *Further Reading
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/244617


    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Team ZigZag

    • Marked as answer by Spencer Xi Wednesday, February 27, 2013 4:46 AM
    Monday, February 25, 2013 8:49 PM