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Gateway overheating after Windows 7 installed RRS feed

  • Question

  • I upgraded to Windows 7 a half a year ago.  Ever since then my computer has been overheating and shutting down whenever I try to play a game or watch videos online.  I have gone through three different laptop cooling stations, but none of them have solved the problem. I know there is adequate airflow for the notebook. It's on a flat surface, with nothing clogging the vents.  I've cleaned all the vents and fans and heat sinks. 

    I downloaded Core Temp to see how hot the computer was running.  It up around 78C and is never lower than 56, even at startup.

    I have a Gateway T-1424u.  BIOS Version 90.03.

    I'm fairly computer literate, but I'm not entirely sure how to change the BIOS settings, which is what someone else suggested on another page.  Is this what should be done?  If so, could you let me know how?

     

    Thank you so much.


    Friday, May 27, 2011 1:16 AM

Answers

All replies


  • It would depend on what settings you were advised to change. Do you recall what they were?

    Your BIOS version is the latest for the T-14 series, but there doesn't appear to be any Windows 7 drivers for it, only XP and Vista.

    How old is the notebook? It's possible the heatsink material between the heatsink and the CPU and other chips has dried out and is not making a good connection any more. Unlikely, but possible, especially if the heatsinks have been moved at all.

    If the heatsink arrangement is anything like my Gateway M-6850fx, there may be an inherent problem with the setup that heat may have made worse. After upgrading to Win7 from Vista, I found mine was running hotter also. I decided to try some Arctic Silver heatsink paste to see if it would make a difference. After taking it apart, I found that the heatsink didn't even touch my graphics chip and what I think is the Northbridge (or Southbridge?) chip. I had to put .015 inch shims between the heatsink and those chips (along with the Arctic Silver, of course). I haven't had any overheating problems since, and that was a little over a year ago.

    If the overheating mainly occurs when playing games or watching videos, install the latest video driver for your video chipset.


    SC Tom


    Friday, May 27, 2011 3:28 AM
  • They talked about changing the fan settings in BIOS.

    I got this laptop in 2009, so it's not too old.

    How would I go about installing the latest video driver? 

     

    Thanks for your help!

    Friday, May 27, 2011 2:08 PM

  • I'm still not sure what they are refering to.
    Is this your notebook?

    http://support.gateway.com/s/notebook/2009/gateway/t/T-1424u/T-1424usp2.shtml

    If so, it has an ATI Radeon X1270 graphics chip. You can get the driver from here:

    64-bit Windows 7: http://sites.amd.com/us/game/downloads/Pages/radeon_win7-64.aspx#2

    32-bit Windows 7: http://sites.amd.com/us/game/downloads/Pages/radeon_win7-32.aspx#2

    Pick the first download, Display Driver.

    If you have any problems installing it, you may have to download the Catalyst Software Suite on the AMD Catalyst Packages tab.


    SC Tom

    • Marked as answer by Miya Yao Friday, June 3, 2011 2:22 AM
    Friday, May 27, 2011 3:36 PM
  • In addition, if the issue persists, I recommend you contact the Gateway support as well.

    Regards,

    Miya


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights. | Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" on the post that helps you, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Tuesday, May 31, 2011 7:54 AM
  • SC Tom you are the exact person I need to talk to after I saw this post. I also have a Gateway M-6850FX and I am having terrible heating issues.  After speaking to gateway's useless customer support i searched for the issue and stumbled on this kinda old forum... I am wondering where I can get the shims because I am quite sure I am suffering from the same problems... I took out the heatsink and cleaned thoroughly the CPU and other greased areas off (completely hardened from the heat).  I reapplied arctic 5 and having some major issues cant even boot the comp up it overheats so quick!  Could I just buy one of those heat pads and smear arctic 5 on that?  When I search for .015 shims all I get back are car parts... please help me I really want to make this machine run again!

    Thanks in advance Tom

    -Joe

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 2:13 AM

  • <Jubs54> wrote in message news:8ce686f0-fe89-4590-b3a4-b82401fb8f88@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    SC Tom you are the exact person I need to talk to after I saw this post. I also have a Gateway M-6850FX and I am having terrible heating issues. After speaking to gateway's useless customer support i searched for the issue and stumbled on this kinda old forum... I am wondering where I can get the shims because I am quite sure I am suffering from the same problems... I took out the heatsink and cleaned thoroughly the CPU and other greased areas off (completely hardened from the heat). I reapplied arctic 5 and having some major issues cant even boot the comp up it overheats so quick! Could I just buy one of those heat pads and smear arctic 5 on that? When I search for .015 shims all I get back are car parts... please help me I really want to make this machine run again!

    Thanks in advance Tom

    -Joe

    Joe,
    I'll help if I can. Here's a post I made in June 2009 describing the problem I was having and the solution:

    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.sys.pc-clone.gateway2000/browse_thread/thread/c1d550aa82f22fb4?hl=en#
     It's not that hard to do. The important things to remember are
    - everything must be very, very clean and shiny (CPU, GPU, Northbridge, and the heatsink). I used Q-tips and rubbing alcohol to clean everything.
    - The heatsink shims have to be as flat as possible. I don't know of anywhere to buy them, which is why I made my own. Once you have the heatsink off, you can measure the size of the GPU and Northbridge chips and make the shims accordingly. If you don't have a micrometer, you can measure the thickness with a good ruler. 1/64 inch is approximately .015 inch thick. Get some 800 or 1000 grit sandpaper from an auto parts place. To polish the shims, tape two pieces of sandpaper to two blocks of flat wood. Put one shim between the block and rub them together in a circular motion until the shims are nice and shiny on both sides.
    - Use a small amount of heatsink paste whether it's Arctic Silver or whatever you use. More is NOT better! If any of it gets down around the other components, it needs to be cleaned off before continuing on. Arctic Silver does have metal in it, and will short out other components. Not too likely if it's a small amount, but is possible.
    - Be sure to tighten the seven mounting screws in the order embossed on the heatsink. Just start them, then tighten them slightly in sequence, repeating the process until all seven are tightened well, but not overly tight. You don't want to pull the posts out :-)

    If you have any questions, be sure to post back here, and I'll see what I can do to answer them. Just remember, slow and easy, performing each step before going to the next. It's not that hard of a job, but cleanliness in the work area and on the laptop is paramount. You don't want to get a hair or lint or anything else between the heatsink and the rest.


    SC Tom

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 2:34 PM
  • Thanks for the speedy response Tom!  I checked out your other post and that is exactly what im going through.  I went out today and grabbed some .016 in aluminum (closest they had) and the 800grit sand paper.  I think I can do this just have a couple more questions. 1.(a) do you just cut out a small square of aluminum to go directly on top of the cpu, gpu and "northbridge" (or do I have to cut holes or anything? 

    2. Do I somehow glue it to the heat sink?im thinking no because of heat and added space

    3. what is the northbridge? the thing that kinda looks like a processor?(i confused it for my intel chip at first). 

    Lastly, i also saw that you were thinking about upgrading your processor on another post... how did that go? i just bought a T9300 refurb at 2.5ghz Im like 95% certain it will fit in the mobo

    Thanks again for all your help Tom

    -Joe

    Tuesday, November 1, 2011 7:50 PM

  • <Jubs54> wrote in message news:21f93e76-d6b1-47fe-af4a-5d1ecd5bd7b3@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    Thanks for the speedy response Tom! I checked out your other post and that is exactly what im going through. I went out today and grabbed some .016 in aluminum (closest they had) and the 800grit sand paper. I think I can do this just have a couple more questions. 1.(a) do you just cut out a small square of aluminum to go directly on top of the cpu, gpu and "northbridge" (or do I have to cut holes or anything?

    2. Do I somehow glue it to the heat sink?im thinking no because of heat and added space

    3. what is the northbridge? the thing that kinda looks like a processor?(i confused it for my intel chip at first).

    Lastly, i also saw that you were thinking about upgrading your processor on another post... how did that go? i just bought a T9300 refurb at 2.5ghz Im like 95% certain it will fit in the mobo

    Thanks again for all your help Tom

    -Joe

    1. You'll have to cut two pieces to fit over the chips themselves. If yours is like mine, once you take the heatsink off, there will be three surfaces that mate with the heatsink- one chip is closest to the fan exhaust (the ATI GPU), one right above it (the Northbridge controller chip), and of course the CPU to the right of those two. You won't need a shim for the CPU- there's enough flex in the heatsink pipe to allow that part of it to tighten down as it should. Cutting hint: Use a utility knife (like the large box cutter styles) and a metal straight-edge to cut the aluminum shim stock. Cut it most of the way through, then just bend it back and forth slightly until it comes apart. That keeps it from curling like it does when using shears to cut it. Use a file to take the burr off the edges.

    2. Use your Arctic 5 like before to put a thin layer on the three chips, put the shims on the two that need them, then more of the Arctic 5 on the heatsink itself in the area where it's going to touch the shims (the CPU should already have enough 5 on it). The front of the heatsink will slightly slide into the exhaust are, then lay down flat on the three surfaces. Try not to slide it once you. got it on the chips or you may slide the shim off of the chips. I've heard of people using super glue instead of heatsink paste or tape, but I've never tried that. It's been years since I heard about that, so maybe that was only on the older PentiumII CPU's that didn't generate quite the heat that the new ones do.

    3. Answered in (1.).

    I did get a new CPU. I upgraded from the original T5550 1.83 GHz to a T8300 2.4GHz. Look at this

    http://ark.intel.com/products/family/26548/Intel-Core2-Duo-Mobile-Processor/mobile

    and scroll down to the T9300; the T8300 is right below it. IIRC, I was going to get the 9300, but it was about $75 more than the 8300 at the time, and I didn't see anything to justify the extra bucks for 100MHz. If it's the same socket, etc., it shouldn't be a problem.

    Addendum to 1.: I was going to use a sheet of the shim stock that would cover both chips as one, but wasn't too sure if air pockets would be detrimental or not. As long as there is good contact with the two main chips, I wouldn't think it would hurt to do it that way.

    Good luck with the project. I think it took me most of a weekend while watching TV to knock mine out (I work best when multi-tasking LOL!), but it was worth it. I'm still using it today, and have had no problems with it since (knock on wood).


    SC Tom

    Wednesday, November 2, 2011 12:24 AM
  • Tom I would like to thank you one more time. I was waiting for my chip to come in the mail and I recieved it yesterday and immediatly got to work on the pc.  I cut the aluminium with sheers because that is all I had. they got a bit bent outta shape but I just hammered them down a little with some soft wood til they flattened.  I applied the layer to the heatsink and the chips themselves.  The only thing I am a little confused about is why my temps are still rather high around 90C during intensive games.. Good thing is though that this processors max temp b4 shutdown is 105 so it should be alright me thinks.  I have been running games like bioshock, Left for dead 2 CS:S and Boarderlands on the highest settings and they have all been running smoothly.  Only thing is this laptop gets hot as crap like where your left hand rests when playing hahaha but not a big deal at all.  Rather do it this way than drop another 750$ on a new machine. 

    Again without you I probably would have done just that. So thanks tom your advice and help on this matter is much appreciated.

    Joe

    Sunday, November 6, 2011 9:00 PM

  • What are you using to measure your temperature? The best program I've used for that is Core Temp http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/ . What is measured is your temperature to go before the CPU hits TJ. Max. Mine is the same as yours (105C), so the display in your system tray is degrees to go before shutdown.

    For some reason, I was never able to get the ones like HWMonitor to read correctly. When I turn my laptop on, HWMonitor says my CPU temp is 0C (32F). My house is warmer than that, and those heatsinks aren't that good :-) Bioshock was the reason I checked my heatsinks in the first place- I had it lock up twice while running it. Since redoing my heatsinks, the worse I get is 15C to TJ. Max, which is still a fairly high temp, but not much to worry about. At least it's not shutting down now. I haven't tried LFD or Borderlands on it, but Far Cry runs smoothly and fairly cool.


    SC Tom

    Sunday, November 6, 2011 10:05 PM
  • Yeah that is actually what I have been using - core temp.. i like it it is pretty nice.  Except I want the temps to stay in the bottom right corner by the time and all, but I cant figure out how to do that.  And I was thinking about possibly a new heatsink as well, but I am also getting around 90C during intensive games.. If and when goes up any more I will consider spending money on a new one.  However, while I was applying grease and all I cleaned the sink with some canned air and got a lot of gunk out of the fan and teeth etc so ill sticj with this one for a  little while at least.  I freaking loved far cry btw I played on console
    Monday, November 7, 2011 6:41 PM