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newbie: moving an SQL Server DB to the cloud RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi group, I'm totally new to the Azure platform and I'd like to ask some very general and probably dummy questions, there are several introductions but I'm a bit in a hurry and we just have to decide for a plan in a few days. My company is experiencing performance issues with data access to a remote SQL Server database, using several client applications based onto WPF or Silverlight, which access data through the EF or via WCF services (in the Silverlight scenarios). These issues appear in not well defined conditions and are linked to server and network usage, so I'm proposing them to migrate their DB to the cloud. As they are skeptical, I'd like to know which is the minimum to be done for migrating an existing DB to the cloud and let them measure the difference. So I have an SQL Server db: what should I do to setup a test scenario? Is the Introductory Special offer enough for testing this? And which would be the typical steps to follow when migrating database schema and data, and adjusting applications (changing the connection string will be enough for clients?)?

    Thanks to all!

    Thursday, January 6, 2011 6:41 PM

Answers

  • I might be misunderstanding your requirements. SQL Azure allows you to configure the IP ranges to allow or deny clients to access your Cloud Instance. If you don't know the IP ranges due to international ISP, you can disable the firewall by allowing all IP address. Your security will rely on your SQL credentials.

    Let me know if that is your objective.

     

     

    Saturday, January 22, 2011 8:03 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    SQL Azure currently offers a sub-set of the full SQL Server functionlity. One of the first things to do is check that the database you plan to migrate does not use any of that functionality.

    There is some details on this here:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee336245.aspx

    There is a SQL Azure Migration Wizard on CodePlex that can help with identifying any migration issues.

    As for licencing, the Intro Special offer should be OK to test and see how it performs. The great thing about Azure is if you use it for a short time the costs are very low.

    Regards,

    Alan

     


    http://www.CloudCasts.net - Community Webcasts Powered by Azure
    Thursday, January 6, 2011 7:06 PM
  • One thing to note here: SQL Azure is not really designed/optimized for classical 2-tier scenarios (where the clients live outside the Azure data center). TDS is not really an internet protocol.

    Also you need to establish firewall rules in SQL Azure at the TCP/IP level which means you need to know the IP addresses of your clients beforehand (which is indeed a problem for 2-tiers with mobile clients).


    Dominick Baier | thinktecture | http://www.leastprivilege.com
    Thursday, January 6, 2011 7:40 PM
  • Thanks to all: anyway, Dominick's answer probably rules out any possibility of using Azure in this case. I have no special SQL server requirements, and the API is very simple because it's designed with a repository pattern and with WCF servicing in mind, but my clients connect to the web with their own provider from anywhere and typically they do not have a fixed IP address. So I should rather look for dedicated SQL Server providers, I suppose...

    Friday, January 7, 2011 9:02 AM
  • More info can be found at: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee730904.aspx
    Selcin Turkarslan
    Thursday, January 20, 2011 9:08 PM
  • I might be misunderstanding your requirements. SQL Azure allows you to configure the IP ranges to allow or deny clients to access your Cloud Instance. If you don't know the IP ranges due to international ISP, you can disable the firewall by allowing all IP address. Your security will rely on your SQL credentials.

    Let me know if that is your objective.

     

     

    Saturday, January 22, 2011 8:03 AM