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It is Possible to Migrate Local User Profile to Roaming Profile Using USMT? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Dear All,

    1st, I'm following guide at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/142682 to copy user profiles to another user, but the problem is the 'Copy to' button is not active (grey). I try using 3rd party tools, still no change.

    2nd, I try to transfer local profile on the same machine and different user using Windows Easy Transfer, it's work and all of data has been restore to a new user. But not all App Settings is restored, when I open Outlook 2010 and Windows Live Mail, there's need to enter password again. That is not problem for me.

    3rd, After migrate/transfer (2nd step) I want to migrate from local profile to roaming profile, but user profile setting on local profile is not copied to roaming profile, such as Email setting need to create new account but all data is not problem, because I have already configure on ADUC and GPMC.

    My question is:

    1. How to copy or move all Application settings on AppData Local folder to roaming profile?

    2. How about USMT, it is possible to migrate user profile settings from local to roaming? if is the best tools, how to do this? 

    Please, advice...

    Thanks,

    Hendra

    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 4:31 AM

Answers

  • 1)  For many years, I would just use group policy to redirect local appdata to a roaming profile.  However, recently I have stopped this practice in favor of better load time for the users, less corruption issues and just old information getting kept from PC to PC.  This change also reduced my storage requirement.  However, if you still want to redirect.  You need to setup the folder structure on a server so users have read/create folder permissions on the profile path.  You then create a GPO that has Folder Redirection set for AppData.  Let me know if you need more details.

    2)  I have not use USMT since I have found great luck with Group Policy.  

    Keep in mind that doing this change will create many more IOPS and create huge delays on first redirection.  I recommend you do this in small matches for starters.  


    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 1:56 PM
  • First, I dont understand why you're using the copy profile method. I'll make the assumption that you have a domain user account that you you need it's files and settings moving to another machine.

    In that scenario then there's a simple guide here: Migrate User Accounts

    For Roaming Profiles and Redirected folders; you can follow the Infrastructure Planning and Design (IPD) Guide for Windows User State Virtualization (USV).

    It sounds like a mouthfull but it actually makes the whole process easy. There's also a video here.

    /Andrew


    Blog: http://scriptimus.wordpress.com

    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 2:42 PM

All replies

  • 1)  For many years, I would just use group policy to redirect local appdata to a roaming profile.  However, recently I have stopped this practice in favor of better load time for the users, less corruption issues and just old information getting kept from PC to PC.  This change also reduced my storage requirement.  However, if you still want to redirect.  You need to setup the folder structure on a server so users have read/create folder permissions on the profile path.  You then create a GPO that has Folder Redirection set for AppData.  Let me know if you need more details.

    2)  I have not use USMT since I have found great luck with Group Policy.  

    Keep in mind that doing this change will create many more IOPS and create huge delays on first redirection.  I recommend you do this in small matches for starters.  


    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 1:56 PM
  • First, I dont understand why you're using the copy profile method. I'll make the assumption that you have a domain user account that you you need it's files and settings moving to another machine.

    In that scenario then there's a simple guide here: Migrate User Accounts

    For Roaming Profiles and Redirected folders; you can follow the Infrastructure Planning and Design (IPD) Guide for Windows User State Virtualization (USV).

    It sounds like a mouthfull but it actually makes the whole process easy. There's also a video here.

    /Andrew


    Blog: http://scriptimus.wordpress.com

    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 2:42 PM