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Guidance on moving from a Java Developer to a Sharepoint Developer RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I am an Intermediate Java Developer looking to move into the .NET world, specifically, I am interested to know if it will be feisable for me to become a Sharepoint Developer.  I have only 8 months of experience with ASP.NET, I built a website last year under the guidance of a friend who is a Senior ASP.NET developer. So I have had exposure to the .NET world, I am comfortable with using Visual Studio and SQL Server.  Having said that, I would classify myself as a Junior ASP.NET developer at best.

    As a Java Developer, I work with JSF which is loosely similar to how ASP.NET is structured.  So I think there is some knowledge which can be transferred between the two.  Obviously, I would be moving toward C# side of things in the .NET world.

    How should I begin this endavour with the end goal of becoming a Sharepoint Developer?  I would appreciate any insight you may have on this.

    I did find this other thread which vaguely relates to my question with the difference being I am not an experienced .NET developer.  So I am not sure whether the advice given there will apply to me. http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/sharepointdevelopment/thread/5c4a47cf-d1cd-4f21-b061-bb13c4255dea

    Thank you.

    Wednesday, August 15, 2012 7:09 PM

Answers

  • Well your Java background certainly isn't a problem. Even experienced ASP.NET developers would have a learning curve moving to SharePoint, and you will be in the same boat.

    There are great free resources from Microsoft as to how to get into SharePoint Development;

    http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/en-us/resources/Pages/Developer-Training-Guide.aspx

    You just have to work at it, it takes time to really get the SharePoint concepts and the way to develop against the API.

    Most but not all SharePoint projects I've worked on have used C# as their language of choice (others used VB.NET). C# is fairly Java-like, but getting to know the differences and libraries will take time.

    Since you are moving between disciplines you might want to consider getting MS Certifications in SharePoint Development. A little comment on that here;

    http://the-north.com/sharepoint/post/2012/04/10/Getting-SharePoint-2010-Certified.aspx

    One thing I find some developers not having is an appreciation of how End Users are utilizing SharePoint, and their solutions don't always compliment that. I might also suggest you get a view of the End User picture;

    http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/en-ie/resources/Pages/End-User-Training-Guide.aspx

    So in summary, your background isn't a problem, but it will take time and effort as it would for anyone else.


    w: http://www.the-north.com/sharepoint | t: @JMcAllisterCH | c: http://www.b-i.com

    • Proposed as answer by Dmitry Kaloshin Thursday, August 16, 2012 12:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by OhTwadi Friday, August 17, 2012 3:17 PM
    Thursday, August 16, 2012 7:41 AM

All replies

  • Well your Java background certainly isn't a problem. Even experienced ASP.NET developers would have a learning curve moving to SharePoint, and you will be in the same boat.

    There are great free resources from Microsoft as to how to get into SharePoint Development;

    http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/en-us/resources/Pages/Developer-Training-Guide.aspx

    You just have to work at it, it takes time to really get the SharePoint concepts and the way to develop against the API.

    Most but not all SharePoint projects I've worked on have used C# as their language of choice (others used VB.NET). C# is fairly Java-like, but getting to know the differences and libraries will take time.

    Since you are moving between disciplines you might want to consider getting MS Certifications in SharePoint Development. A little comment on that here;

    http://the-north.com/sharepoint/post/2012/04/10/Getting-SharePoint-2010-Certified.aspx

    One thing I find some developers not having is an appreciation of how End Users are utilizing SharePoint, and their solutions don't always compliment that. I might also suggest you get a view of the End User picture;

    http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/en-ie/resources/Pages/End-User-Training-Guide.aspx

    So in summary, your background isn't a problem, but it will take time and effort as it would for anyone else.


    w: http://www.the-north.com/sharepoint | t: @JMcAllisterCH | c: http://www.b-i.com

    • Proposed as answer by Dmitry Kaloshin Thursday, August 16, 2012 12:06 PM
    • Marked as answer by OhTwadi Friday, August 17, 2012 3:17 PM
    Thursday, August 16, 2012 7:41 AM
  • Hi,
    additionally to the ones from  Jamie I would recommend you to have a look at this SharePoint 2010 Developer Training Course. This course contains free technical SharePoint 2010 training. This course includes a set of videos, hands-on labs, and source code samples to get you up-to-speed quickly.

    Dmitry

    Lightning Tools LogoLightning Tools Check out our SharePoint tools and web parts | Lightning Tools Blog

    Thursday, August 16, 2012 12:13 PM
  • Thank you Jamie for the valueable insight.  My aim indeed is to get certified in Sharepoint Development. I will likely start with Developer Training Guide and go from there. I also have a pluralsight trial membership which seems to have lots of training videos as well.

    Thursday, August 16, 2012 3:00 PM
  • Thanks Dmitry.  I have already downloaded this and will be looking at this today.
    Thursday, August 16, 2012 3:01 PM