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Windows Home and installing my own licenced XP Professional in Virtual PC 2007 RRS feed

  • Question

  • It is stated that XP Mode will not work with Windows 7 Home edition.

    However, according to the following page Virtual PC will work with Windows 7 Home edition:
    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/support/requirements.aspx

    So, if I have a valid licence for a Retail XP Professional will I be able to install Virtual PC on Home Edition and then install my XP Pro inside the Virtual PC?
    Not to fussed about the integration with Windows 7 etc just as long as I have a fallback plan in case I have to run an XP app.

    I have mutiple PCs at home running XP Pro and would prefer to buy Home edition for all of them and save some money. The only Win7 Pro feature I think I may perhaps need is the XP Mode bit...
    The price difference is considerable here in the UK.

    Wednesday, July 29, 2009 10:03 AM

Answers

  • Installing Virtual PC on Windows 7

    Windows Virtual PC is a feature of Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, and Windows 7 Enterprise, that allows you to run multiple Windows environments such as Windows XP Mode from your Windows 7 desktop.

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    The list of features for the new version is impressive when compared to the old Virtual PC 2007 version (which had none of these). Finally, Microsoft is adding many features that are already long present in 3rd-party virtualization software like VMware Workstation and Sun Virtual Box. But I guess late is better than never. Some of the new features of Virtual PC include:

    • Easy setup of Windows XP Mode - Once both the Windows Virtual PC and the virtual Windows XP environment are installed, Windows Virtual PC provides a simple wizard to set up Windows XP Mode with just a few clicks.
    • USB support - Users can access USB devices attached to the host directly from virtual Windows XP. These devices include printers and scanners, flash memory/sticks and external hard disks, digital cameras, and more.
    • Seamless applications - Publish and launch applications installed on virtual Windows XP directly from the Windows 7 desktop, as if they were installed on the Windows 7 host itself.
      Folder integration between host and guest - Access your Windows 7 Known Folders: My Documents, Pictures, Desktop, Music, and Video, from inside the virtual Windows environment, such as Windows XP Mode.
    • Clipboard sharing - Cut and paste between your Windows 7 host and any virtual machine.
    • Printer redirection - Print directly to your attached printer from your seamless application or virtual machine.

    Important: To run Windows Virtual PC (and with it, XPM), your computer has to have the Intel VT or AMD-V features enabled in the BIOS. To find out if your PC is virtualization capable, please visit the Windows Virtual PC support page:

    www.microsoft.com/virtual-pc/support.aspx

    Note: All screenshots and procedures are based on the RC version of Windows 7, and the beta version of Virtual PC. When Windows 7 and Virtual PC become RTM, file names and download locations might change.

    Installation Instructions for Virtual PC

    1. Download the Windows6.1-KB958559-x64.msu update from the following link:

    Windows Virtual PC Download: http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/download.aspx

    Installing this update will install Virtual PC (Beta) for Windows 7.

    2. Double click on the Windows6.1-KB958559-x64.msu to launch the installation.

     

    3. In the installer window, click "Yes".

     

    4. In the License Terms window, click "I Accept" (if you do accept) to begin the installation.

     

    5. When done, reboot the computer.

    Now, when you type "virtual" in the Windows 7 Start menu, you'll get a link to Virtual PC.

    Clicking on it will bring you to the Virtual Machines folder (which can be configured to be at a location of your choice - more about this in a future article).

     

     

    How To Install Windows XP Mode (XPM) on Windows 7

    In my previous article ("Installing Virtual PC on Windows 7") I walked you through the features of the new Windows Virtual PC software that is specially designed for Windows 7. Windows Virtual PC provides the capability to run multiple Windows environments such as Windows XP Mode from your Windows 7 desktop.

    What Exactly is Windows XP Mode?

    Windows XP Mode (or XPM for short) is a new feature of Windows 7 (available only in the Professional, Enterprise and Ultimate editions) that can help businesses to upgrade their computers to Windows 7. It does so by providing a virtual Windows XP environment capable of running many Windows XP-compatible business and productivity applications. By using Windows Virtual PC you can now run many older business and productivity applications that only work in Windows XP on your Windows 7 machine. This is made possible by installing these applications inside the Windows XP virtual machine, and integrating them with your Windows 7 desktop and start menu. This way, you can launch these applications from the Windows 7 desktop or Start menu with just a single click, and have them integrate seamlessly with the Windows 7 environment.

    Here are some of new features in Windows Virtual PC that make it easier for you to run your legacy applications in a virtual software environment:

    • The ability to use many of your USB devices from within a virtual Windows environment, such as Windows XP Mode.
    • Seamless launching of Windows XP applications from your Windows 7 desktop, Start Menu, or Taskbar.
    • Clipboard sharing, which enables you to cut, copy, and paste data between the host Windows 7 desktop and the virtual machine.
    • Printer sharing between the Windows 7 desktop and the virtual Windows environment.
    • Drive sharing, which provides easy access to all host data from within the virtual machine.
    • Folder integration between operating environments

    How to Install Windows XPM

    Important: To run Windows Virtual PC (and with it, XPM), your computer has to have the Intel VT or AMD-V features enabled in the BIOS. To find out if your PC is virtualization capable, please visit the Windows Virtual PC support page:

    www.microsoft.com/virtual-pc/support.aspx

    Another important note: XPM is a concept. Not a virtual machine. However, Microsoft has made a default Windows XP VM available to download, and has integrated it into Windows Virtual PC. Thus, when referring to XPM, in fact I am talking about what is called "Virtual Windows XP".

    Note: All screenshots and procedures are based on the RC version of Windows 7, and the beta version of Virtual PC.

    First, make sure you've installed Virtual PC (see my Virtual PC installation instructions) and rebooted your machine.

    Next, type "virtual" in the Windows 7 Start menu, you'll get a link to Virtual PC, and another one to Virtual Windows XP.

     

    If you click on Virtual Windows XP, you'll be prompted to download it.

     

    You can use the following link for the download, which is 445MB in size:

    http://www.microsoft.com/windows/virtual-pc/download.aspx

    Note: You do not need to re-download it for every PC you need to install it on, just download once and manually install it multiple times.

    When the download has finished, double-click on the VirtualWindowsXP.msi file to launch the installation.

     

    Click Run.

     

    Click Next.

     

    Next, accept the file location at C:\Program Files\Virtual Windows XP, and click Next.

     

    Note: You will need quite a lot of disk space on the C:\ partition,not just because the Virtual Windows XP installation is big, but also depending on the amount, type and size of all the applications that you plan to use in the virtual XP machine. So, if you plan to use Virtual Windows XP extensively, consider changing this path. More about that in a later article on working with virtual Windows XP Disks in Windows Virtual PC and Windows 7.

    You might be prompted by the Windows 7 User Account Control (UAC) prompt. Click Yes to continue the installation.

    When the installation process is over click Finish.

     

    Note: Since the current version of Virtual PC for Windows 7 is beta, you might want to remove the default Virtual Windows XP machine when the RTM version is available.

    Launching the Virtual Windows XP

    When you finished installing it, you were prompted to launch Virtual Windows XP.

     

    If you did not do so then, you can always launch it from the Start menu.

     

    You can also go to the Virtual Machines folder, you will now see a shortcut to Virtual Windows XP.

     

    Either as the final phase of the installation process, or as a separate click, when you first launch Virtual Windows XP, you will be prompted to accept the license agreement. Select the "I accept" check-box, and then click Next.

     

    Next, you'll be prompted to provide a password for the default user account (called "user") that the Virtual Windows XP machine will use. You can also configure Virtual PC to remember these credentials (which will make using the VM much more easier, not having to enter this information each time you're going to use it). Click Next.

     

    Next, you'll be asked if you want to enable auto-updates for the Virtual Windows XP machine. Because this is a beta system I chose not to enable auto-updates. Click Next.

     

    As this is the first time Virtual Windows XP is launched, it will take a few moments till it prepares the VM for first use. You will see a progress bar windows that will change for a few moments.

     

     

     

     

     

    Finally, if you've got a sound card and speakers on your system, you'll hear the good old Windows XP starting sound, and you'll see the XP desktop ready for your usage.

     

     

     

    3rd Party Disclaimer

     

    NOTE - Disclaimer

    The links in this message may lead to third-party Web sites. Microsoft provides third-party resources to help you find customer service and/or technical support resources. Information at these sites may change without notice. Microsoft is not responsible for the content at any third-party Web sites and does not guarantee the accuracy of third-party information.

    • Edited by Anil Inampudi Wednesday, August 5, 2009 1:48 PM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Thursday, August 6, 2009 5:33 AM
    Tuesday, August 4, 2009 2:48 PM