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Lync 2013 integration with old legacy PBX RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a Lync 2013 deployment here, fully functional, everything working great. Now, we need to start deploying phones and migrating users to it. The problem is that we have an ancient ROLM/Seimens tdm PBX from the 1980's. It is connected to three T1's for pstn calls.

    I initially wanted to deploy lync phones on everyone's desk.. and for a short while users would have two phones on their desk until we were finished.

    Now, I'm wondering if I should connect Lync and the ROLM pbx together? It's my understanding a gateway device has to be put in place. I have several questions regarding this route.

    • What peice of hardware do I need to purchase? Any examples? I see products such as Audiocodes Mediant 1000 for $2000... or the MediaPack MP-114 for $500.. both are labeled as "VOIP Gateways".. what's the difference???
    • Where should we place it? In between the T1's and the ROLM -or- between the ROLM and Lync? I would rather not have to involve our existing phone company providing the T1 lines for any support at this point.. so I'm wanting to opt for placing the gateway between ROLM and Lync if possible.

    Thanks!

    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 5:55 PM

Answers

  • Hi KyleA,

    My recommendation would be to do an upstream migration of your PBX phone system to Lync Server 2013.  For this, you are going to need some sort of Gateway device (as you mentioned in your thread) in order to be able to handle call flow/call manipulation. 

    Below is an example of an upstream migration (h/t Justin Morris)

    As you can see in the diagram above, your PRIs would come into the gateway, that gateway will take some sort of action against the call and either send it to your old PBX. The old PBX T1 ports would connect to the gateway as well.  For Lync, we'll just use SIP and send the calls directly the the mediation pool.If you look at the Lync OIP list, you'll get a list of certified gateways.  Also, it may interest you look at a SBC which will also provide the same functionality as a gateway, but may provide future flexibility. 

    Personally, I would stick with AudioCodes (Mediant 1000) or Sonus (SBC 2000).  You'll need a "medium-sized" unit than the entry sized units due to your requirements for 3 PRI ports, plus 3 T1 ports for your legacy PBX.


    Please “Vote As Helpful” and/or “Mark As Answer” if this post helped you. Thanks!
    Adam Curry, UC Consultant, Unify Square Inc. (Blog, Twitter)
    Looking for Lync Users Groups in your area? Check out Lync Users Group

    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, July 11, 2013 8:27 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:26 AM
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 7:06 PM
  • As for your plan, you don't need PBX integration if you follow it as two systems will sit in parallel. The only problem I see is user extensions \ existing phone numbers they want to keep.

    You need some cut-over plan for those.

    If  customer is OK having only 4 or 8 concurrent calls between the systems, then go with MP-11X  4- or 8- ports as co-existence solution.

    MP-118 gives you 8 analog lines instead of 4 with MP-114.

    Check on AudioCodes site for configuration details.


    • Edited by OZ2006 Thursday, July 11, 2013 3:38 PM updated info
    • Proposed as answer by OZ2006 Thursday, July 11, 2013 4:08 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:27 AM
    Thursday, July 11, 2013 2:44 PM

All replies

  • Hi KyleA,

    My recommendation would be to do an upstream migration of your PBX phone system to Lync Server 2013.  For this, you are going to need some sort of Gateway device (as you mentioned in your thread) in order to be able to handle call flow/call manipulation. 

    Below is an example of an upstream migration (h/t Justin Morris)

    As you can see in the diagram above, your PRIs would come into the gateway, that gateway will take some sort of action against the call and either send it to your old PBX. The old PBX T1 ports would connect to the gateway as well.  For Lync, we'll just use SIP and send the calls directly the the mediation pool.If you look at the Lync OIP list, you'll get a list of certified gateways.  Also, it may interest you look at a SBC which will also provide the same functionality as a gateway, but may provide future flexibility. 

    Personally, I would stick with AudioCodes (Mediant 1000) or Sonus (SBC 2000).  You'll need a "medium-sized" unit than the entry sized units due to your requirements for 3 PRI ports, plus 3 T1 ports for your legacy PBX.


    Please “Vote As Helpful” and/or “Mark As Answer” if this post helped you. Thanks!
    Adam Curry, UC Consultant, Unify Square Inc. (Blog, Twitter)
    Looking for Lync Users Groups in your area? Check out Lync Users Group

    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, July 11, 2013 8:27 AM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:26 AM
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 7:06 PM
  • MP-114 (AudioCodes) has only 4 or 8 FXO modules, i.e. 4 or 8 concurrent calls between PBX and Lync. PBX needs a spare capacity to provide those FXO lines.

    AudioCodes  or NET or Dialogic all have similar products that can utilize T1 module to connect to a spare T1 card on PBX.

    Problem is its cost as M1000 is about 3500 -4000 with T1 module, chassis, etc. and if there is no spare T1 in PBX then you have to absorb its cost as well.

    Depends on the number of users, I've seen customers doing over-a-weekend migrations to avoid coexistence cost.

    • Proposed as answer by Sharon.Shen Thursday, July 11, 2013 8:27 AM
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 7:33 PM
  • Ok, I'm understanding this a bit more now.

    So, if I go with an Audiocodes MP-114 with 4 ports, then that will connect to 4 ports on the legacy PBX to allow 4 concurrent calls back to the legacy system?

    We have about 400-500ish phones in the building. My initial plan was to port over small groups at a time (20-30 users) to Lync. I would install the new voip lync phone on their desk along-side their old legacy phone. After everyone had a new voip phone I would remove the old legacy phones from everyone's desk and switch off the old legacy pbx. Going this route I wouldn't need to tie the two PBXs (Lync and Legacy ROLM PBX) together - they would always be independent of each other. It seems less hassle this way.

    Now, the other question was, we have an old analog Motorola pager system and a PA system for the front office. I believe the audiocodes MP-114 could handle these two devices just perfectly, am I thinking correct?

    Thanks!


    • Edited by Kyle A Thursday, July 11, 2013 12:25 PM editing
    Thursday, July 11, 2013 12:24 PM
  • I've seen customers using SNOM PA-1 system connected to something like MP-114 or directly to the network. Please see SNOM docs for details.

    PA-1 is basically SIP-capable device that logins to Lync Server as an Enterprise Voice-enabled user with auto-answer response and on the other end it connects to PA zone controller.

    If multiples zones are needed then multiple PA-1s have to be configured.

    Lync user dials specified extension for page, PA-1 auto-answers the voice call and everything then goes to zone controller and speakers.

    Thursday, July 11, 2013 2:41 PM
  • As for your plan, you don't need PBX integration if you follow it as two systems will sit in parallel. The only problem I see is user extensions \ existing phone numbers they want to keep.

    You need some cut-over plan for those.

    If  customer is OK having only 4 or 8 concurrent calls between the systems, then go with MP-11X  4- or 8- ports as co-existence solution.

    MP-118 gives you 8 analog lines instead of 4 with MP-114.

    Check on AudioCodes site for configuration details.


    • Edited by OZ2006 Thursday, July 11, 2013 3:38 PM updated info
    • Proposed as answer by OZ2006 Thursday, July 11, 2013 4:08 PM
    • Marked as answer by Sharon.Shen Tuesday, July 23, 2013 3:27 AM
    Thursday, July 11, 2013 2:44 PM
  • As for your plan, you don't need PBX integration if you follow it as two systems will sit in parallel. The only problem I see is user extensions \ existing phone numbers they want to keep.

    You need some cut-over plan for those.

    If  customer is OK having only 4 or 8 concurrent calls between the systems, then go with MP-11X  4- or 8- ports as co-existence solution.

    MP-118 gives you 8 analog lines instead of 4 with MP-114.

    Check on AudioCodes site for configuration details.


    Do you have details on integrating the voip gateway to a legacy PBX and Lync? This topic is largely undocumented from what I can tell.

    My understanding is that, if I choose the MP-124, I'll plug in 24 phone lines from the legacy PBX to the voip gateway, which will allow it to talk to my Lync server. If extension 4123 from the legacy PBX is configured for one of these particular lines connected to the gateway then the gateway forwards it to Lync, then Lync forwards it to the new voip phone(at ext 4123), correct? If voip phone with ext 4123 calls an analog user on legacy pbx, then Lync forwards it to the audiocodes gateway, then the gateway forwards it to the legacy PBX and sends it to the old analog phone, correct?

    I think the MP-124 would be sufficient for our migration as it would allow 24 channels.

    Thursday, July 11, 2013 10:30 PM
  • I would suggest that you integrate your existing PBX with Lync, and sequentially discard the PBX. this can be a lengthy task but will be almost seamless for your clients. first integrate Lync with PBX, and also deploy VoIP gateway, terminate trunk on gateway too which will be used in future permanently, ask users to use both, after few weeks start removing old phones and once solution is stable n 100% working then remove PBX

    Atif Bilal MCITP Fatima Group Lahore, Pakistan Skype: bilalatif83

    Wednesday, January 29, 2014 8:27 AM