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Windows Anytime Upgrade? RRS feed

  • Question


  • Ronnie, I think you must believe I am trying to post misleading information on this site for some devious reason.  That is untrue.

    Regarding the locked thread Can OEM Vista 32bit be upgraded to Win7 64bit ?, I have further mulled over your statement that I might, could, or should have known to contact my OEM Vendor for a 32-64 bit nominal-fee upgrade.  (Not that I would want OEMware anyway - my objective would be to install real MS Windows).  In pursuit of this, I have just opened Control Panel and clicked the Windows Anytime Upgrade.  I expected I might find something there which you base your information on.    Nothing being apparent, I noticed and clicked the License Announcement tab to learn:


    Windows Anytime Upgrade and Windows Additional Licenses announcement
    Thank you for your interest in Windows Anytime Upgrade and Windows Additional Licenses.

    The page you're trying to visit is no longer available. Based on customer feedback, Microsoft and its partners have decided to streamline the Windows Anytime Upgrade experience and end digital product key distribution on February 20, 2008.



    I see nothing there that redirects me to my OEM vendor or explains the terms of any such OEM program.  There has been plenty of time since Feb 2008 to update that information.  However, if I now consult Vista Forums for advice, here's what I get:

    home premium 32bit to home premium 64 bit??

    Vista 32bit to 64bit i7 920

    32 to 64 bit Vista

    I do not want to debate semantics here.  These threads unconditionally state the OPs must purchase new full 64-bit licenses.  They are marked "answer" by MVPs.  There is not a hint the OP might go back to his OEM Vendor to obtain the Windows Disc at a nominal feeNot a hint.



    I have been hesitant to mention this before because I might be wrong in my recollection.  But I think I recall back in 2008 that my OEM Vendor was charging an extra $100-150 for Vista 64bit (versus 32bit).  Else I likely would have gotten at least one of these computers with Vista 64bit.  So it makes sense to me today that there is some licensing agreement between MS and OEMs that precludes upgrading the Vista32 Home Premium license.  Maybe I am wrong about this.

    Now, while you will scorn and ridicule me for it Ronnie, I have reasoned that maybe MS has changed their marketing model for 32-64bit since Vista.  Maybe MS has relaxed that OEM Vista policy as applies to Win7 ?  So I looked to see what the latest information is on that.  Specifically, I looked at the June 26 New Computer upgrade program policies.  I found a number of references to eligibility and 32/64-bit platforms and etc on this page  Windows 7 Upgrade Options- Program Information.  It leads me to believe the OEM policy is much the same for Win7 as it was for Vista.  To be clear, it seems some 32-64bit license upgrades are prohibited.



    So to complete this thought, I don't see that an Anytime Upgrade program even exists the way I might anticipate it, not since Feb 2008.  There is nothing I can find in the MS Store that suggests I can even purchase Vista Home Premium 64-bit, direct or indirect.  Other MVPs have given much more recent information that simply does not refer to the OEM Vendor.  (As recent as June 12, 2009).

    What has changed since June that I now receive a hand-waving reassurance in July, Ronnie?



    As I have already posted, all I am looking for is a MS web page that plainly states:  THE CHOICE IS YOURS - 32bit or 64bit

    Why is it unreasonable to ask for that?

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 5:16 PM

Answers

  • Egads

    The main problem with what you are trying to do is

    Number 1: Most of the upgrade offers for Vista ended a long time ago.

    Number 2: You are mixing the defunct Windows Vista offers with the emerging (and not yet completely clear) Windows 7 offers.

    But let's put the main part of your concern to rest about the 
    Windows Vista Alternate Media offer. I stated before that this offer was only available for the Retail product. If you look at the page for that offer you will see that it is focused on Retail versions only and mentions this fact many times.

    If you enter your OEM product key, you will see the information, No offers found. As you have already found. If you click the Contact Us link at the bottom of the page to find out why you will see:

    Contact your computer manufacturer for support
     if your product was pre-installed on your computer.

    You can further clarify this by performing an internet search for the keywords: "vista" "alternate media" "OEM" including the quotes.

    Here is a quote from one of the results that I found.

    -----

    Microsoft SMB Community Blog : Is the process the same to get 64-bit Windows Vista media for OEM as it is for Retail?

    >quote>

    Is the process the same to get 64-bit Windows Vista media for OEM as it is for Retail?

    Since my “Help! I got the 32-bit version of Windows Vista and I needed the 64-bit version. Now what?!” post on Monday that explained the process to obtain the 64-bit media in the event you inadvertently purchased the 32-bit Retail Box version of Windows Vista, I have received some follow-up emails asking if the process is the same for the OEM version of Windows Vista. Here is the answer to that question:

    Remember that anytime you purchase OEM software, your agreement is with your system builder since they are the ones responsible for all support of that OEM software on your PC. As such, the Windows Vista alternate media program that I referred to in my post on Monday applies specifically to versions of Windows Vista that were purchased in the retail channel, not the OEM channel.  If a customer has obtained Windows Vista pre-loaded or through an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) or system builder channel, they should consult with their OEM System Builder to acquire the 64-bit media for those licenses.

    Thank you and have a wonderful day,

    Eric Ligman

    Microsoft US Senior Manager

    Small Business Community Engagement

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights

    </quote>

    There are hundreds of links like this in the results.

    -----

    Another instance is at the following website discussing obtaining the alternate media on CDs.

    Get Windows Vista: Order CDs

    To order your alternate media, you will need to provide your Product Key and contact information where we can send your new media. Your Product Key is located on the back of the disc tray in the box. The Product Key contains both letters and numbers arranged in a string of five groups of five characters each. A minimal charge, including shipping and handling, will apply.

    Also, please note that in accordance with industry practices, the operating system license that you purchased grants you the rights to install one copy of Windows Vista on one PC. By ordering this additional set of media, you do not receive any additional license rights. This offer may only be available for a limited time.

    If you have purchased a license of Windows Vista from an OEM or System Builder, please contact the OEM where you acquired the software.

    Thank you for choosing Windows Vista.

    -----

    In addition, the OEM manufacturer had the right to end this alternative media program any time they wished. Some ran it for a certain time period like 6 months or a year. Others tied it to the warranty period for the PC.  Still others didn't offer it at all.

    The bottom line is that Retail and OEM are completely different product licenses with completely different support. This is the main reason that the OEM versions carry a much lower price tag.

    I hope this puts this issue to rest.

    If you wish to continue the discussion about Vista, please start another thread in the Vista forums.

    If you wish to discuss the Windows 7 offers, please start another thread here.

    Thanks for understanding.


    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Forum Moderator
    • Marked as answer by Andy Song Friday, July 17, 2009 6:36 AM
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 1:15 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • In the Windows Vista newsgroups, I have often replied to Windows Vista 32-bit OEM users that by contacting their computer manufacturer, they can likely acquire the OEM's 64-bit Windows Vista recovery or reinstallation disc.  The original OEM product key will work with either a 32-bit or 64-bit installation disc.  Also, if you have access to a conventional OEM or Retail Windows Vista 64-bit DVD, you can install the 64-bit version using your original OEM product key. However, you'll have to "activate by phone" in order to activate the new installation, which takes less than six minutes.

    Please note that it is entirely up to the computer manufacturer whether or not they will provide a 64-bit Windows Vista disc if you make a request.
    Carey Frisch
    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 5:39 PM
    Moderator

  • Carey, thank you very much for that info.



    I don't want to diminish the value of your response.  But I must share with you that when I made an inquiry a long time back, they not only did not offer such, but in fact warned if I installed a retail-box Windows it would invalidate my warranty.  Of course an argument ensued.

    In any case, I do believe there is some licensing agreement between MS and OEMs that makes it difficult to plainly state the OEM 32-64 upgrade policy.  Most simply stated, I think the OEMs originally charged extra for 64bit.  I don't think OEM 32bit is even upgradable to 64bit in the commonly understood retail sense.  That's why we see those "answers" in the Vista Forum, among other vaguely stated info.  Yet, there are not many non-OEM Vista users, so my concern represents the majority of Vista installations.  Maybe I'm just pushing a point that MS would prefer to manage more quietly.  In the meantime, I feel belittled and flamed for having raised the issue.  It's not been a very nice experience at all.  I do appreciate your answer just now.  Thanks.

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 6:28 PM
  • Egads

    The main problem with what you are trying to do is

    Number 1: Most of the upgrade offers for Vista ended a long time ago.

    Number 2: You are mixing the defunct Windows Vista offers with the emerging (and not yet completely clear) Windows 7 offers.

    But let's put the main part of your concern to rest about the 
    Windows Vista Alternate Media offer. I stated before that this offer was only available for the Retail product. If you look at the page for that offer you will see that it is focused on Retail versions only and mentions this fact many times.

    If you enter your OEM product key, you will see the information, No offers found. As you have already found. If you click the Contact Us link at the bottom of the page to find out why you will see:

    Contact your computer manufacturer for support
     if your product was pre-installed on your computer.

    You can further clarify this by performing an internet search for the keywords: "vista" "alternate media" "OEM" including the quotes.

    Here is a quote from one of the results that I found.

    -----

    Microsoft SMB Community Blog : Is the process the same to get 64-bit Windows Vista media for OEM as it is for Retail?

    >quote>

    Is the process the same to get 64-bit Windows Vista media for OEM as it is for Retail?

    Since my “Help! I got the 32-bit version of Windows Vista and I needed the 64-bit version. Now what?!” post on Monday that explained the process to obtain the 64-bit media in the event you inadvertently purchased the 32-bit Retail Box version of Windows Vista, I have received some follow-up emails asking if the process is the same for the OEM version of Windows Vista. Here is the answer to that question:

    Remember that anytime you purchase OEM software, your agreement is with your system builder since they are the ones responsible for all support of that OEM software on your PC. As such, the Windows Vista alternate media program that I referred to in my post on Monday applies specifically to versions of Windows Vista that were purchased in the retail channel, not the OEM channel.  If a customer has obtained Windows Vista pre-loaded or through an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) or system builder channel, they should consult with their OEM System Builder to acquire the 64-bit media for those licenses.

    Thank you and have a wonderful day,

    Eric Ligman

    Microsoft US Senior Manager

    Small Business Community Engagement

    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights

    </quote>

    There are hundreds of links like this in the results.

    -----

    Another instance is at the following website discussing obtaining the alternate media on CDs.

    Get Windows Vista: Order CDs

    To order your alternate media, you will need to provide your Product Key and contact information where we can send your new media. Your Product Key is located on the back of the disc tray in the box. The Product Key contains both letters and numbers arranged in a string of five groups of five characters each. A minimal charge, including shipping and handling, will apply.

    Also, please note that in accordance with industry practices, the operating system license that you purchased grants you the rights to install one copy of Windows Vista on one PC. By ordering this additional set of media, you do not receive any additional license rights. This offer may only be available for a limited time.

    If you have purchased a license of Windows Vista from an OEM or System Builder, please contact the OEM where you acquired the software.

    Thank you for choosing Windows Vista.

    -----

    In addition, the OEM manufacturer had the right to end this alternative media program any time they wished. Some ran it for a certain time period like 6 months or a year. Others tied it to the warranty period for the PC.  Still others didn't offer it at all.

    The bottom line is that Retail and OEM are completely different product licenses with completely different support. This is the main reason that the OEM versions carry a much lower price tag.

    I hope this puts this issue to rest.

    If you wish to continue the discussion about Vista, please start another thread in the Vista forums.

    If you wish to discuss the Windows 7 offers, please start another thread here.

    Thanks for understanding.


    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Forum Moderator
    • Marked as answer by Andy Song Friday, July 17, 2009 6:36 AM
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 1:15 AM
    Moderator

  • My latter HP notebook came to me the end of 2008.  It still has the defunct Windows Anytime Upgrade icon in Control Panel, as you put it.  I assumed that icon is present in all production Vista.  Isn't it?

    I am among hundreds of millions of consumers who were unaware of the second-quality nature of the Windows you describe in our prebuilt systems.  Prebuilt by reputable vendors like HP.  Prebuilt systems that come with no apparent information saying it contains second-quality OEMware.  Certainly you are aware of that.  You could have therefore passed along this gem of wisdom two weeks ago or earlier.  Why didn't you?

    Ronnie, I believe you just discovered the search string Alternate Media today.  I didn't think of looking for that.  Why would I?  I see nothing there that applies to my circumstance anyway.  My OEMware came factory installed in the D: Recovery Partition.  No disks with yellow barcodes on some jewel case.  No shipping insert with a www offer to clue me about any such defunct program about Alternate Media.



    I still do not see how to obtain Vista Home Premium 64bit from Microsoft.

    I still do not see that my OEMware Vista 32bit is eligible for the Win7 64bit upgrade.





    No Ronnie, I did not find what you just explained helpful in any other manner beyond demonstrating your intent to disprove and flame me.

    Yet I am not trying to prove anything.

    Thursday, July 16, 2009 2:29 AM
  • Egads

    I directly supported Windows Vista for over 2 years in the newsgroups and these forums. My memory is good, but I have over 7GB of data from all of my research. Locating a specific item can be time consuming and we are far too busy on these forums to allow for a lot of research time.

    I did take the time to retrieve that information early this morning so that I could try once again to answer your questions.

    "I still do not see how to obtain Vista Home Premium 64bit from Microsoft."

    The whole point to my last reply is that you cannot.

    I don't set the policies for Microsoft, I just try to let other users know what those policies are.

    I'm not sure where you saw any flaming in my last post?


    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Forum Moderator

    Thursday, July 16, 2009 3:49 AM
    Moderator
  • Egads

    I directly supported Windows Vista for over 2 years in the newsgroups and these forums. My memory is good, but I have over 7GB of data from all of my research. Locating a specific item can be time consuming and we are far too busy on these forums to allow for a lot of research time.

    I did take the time to retrieve that information early this morning so that I could try once again to answer your questions.

    "I still do not see how to obtain Vista Home Premium 64bit from Microsoft."

    The whole point to my last reply is that you cannot.

    I don't set the policies for Microsoft, I just try to let other users know what those policies are.

    I'm not sure where you saw any flaming in my last post?

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Forum Moderator

     




    Then you should easily see my concern that it is likely ineligible for the highly publicized Windows7 (64bit) Upgrade.


    As I inquired repeatedly, advertising that upgrade package contains both 32bit and 64bit disks is not the same as saying that either may be installed.



    Ronnie, you could have discreetly acknowledged that two weeks ago, and I would have let it drop.  Or at least I wouldn't have felt as offended as I now do that you have relocated and buried this post.  After humiliating me by locking and killing numerous other threads on this related topic.  Yes, offended and humiliated.  I resent it.

    Thursday, July 16, 2009 4:09 AM
  • Then you should easily see my concern that it is likely ineligible for the highly publicized Windows7 (64bit) Upgrade.


    As I inquired repeatedly, advertising that upgrade package contains both 32bit and 64bit disks is not the same as saying that either may be installed.



    Ronnie, you could have discreetely acknowledged that two weeks ago, and I would have let it drop.  Or at least I wouldn't have felt as offended as I now do that you have relocated and buried this post.  After humiliating me by locking and killing numerous other threads on this related topic.  Yes, offended and humiliated.  I resent it.

    Egads

    The clarification about the Windows 7 upgrades has not been published yet. As soon as we get that information we will post it.

    In my opinion, if it contains both disks then they can be used to install either version?

    I explained before that we are far too busy to be able to spend the time looking for old information.

    "After humiliating me by locking and killing numerous other threads on this related topic.  Yes, offended and humiliated.  I resent it."

    I cannot imagine why that would have been humiliating? I believe that we told you that those posts were off topic prior to them being locked or removed. A simple statement of the facts was not good enough, so it took some time to find the proof.

    I did not relocate this thread. I am not the only Moderator on these forums.

    This will be my last post to this thread.


    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Forum Moderator
    Thursday, July 16, 2009 4:24 AM
    Moderator

  • I think we pretty much have closure on this topic now.  Thank you.

    Thursday, July 16, 2009 4:28 AM