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do you have to run sysprep when making an image RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am getting ready to deploy WSS on about 7 computers for a church afterschool program.

    According the the notes in the handbook they state that running sysprep is optional.

    If I setup the reference pc, lock down the user, DO NOT LOCK the hard drive, can I run GHOST or BESR and make images for the other workstations with out using SYSPREP, or is sysprep required to make images?

     

    I have searched the posts and did not find any information that did not mention where someone did a sysprep before deploying images.

     

    Thanks

    Mark Stamper

    Monday, September 29, 2008 2:28 PM

Answers

  • In my experience exporting and then importing user profiles is a waste of time and doesn’t work well.  Also, why install Steady State each time if you dont' have to.

    Here is what I do:

    Our Procedure:

    Here is how I do it with Windows XP Pro

    Make one workstation your “Master Image”

    1.       Install Windows, Install Updates, and all necessary software

    2.       Create a new Default User Profile – I’ll talk about that later

    3.       Install Steady State, configure a user profile, set restrictions but NEVER LOCK the profile, test

    4.       Remove all restrictions in Steady State

    5.       Sysprep the computer

    6.       Create an image of the computer

    Our OnSite

    1.       Reimage each workstation with the “Master Image”

    2.       Install any custom software for each individual workstation – test

    3.       Set restrictions in Steady State – test

    4.       Lock the account – Test

    5.       Install WDP and enable

    I customize the Default User Profile in Windows XP.  There are steps to do this on Page 61 of the Steady State manual.  The previous page kinda talks about it but the idea is that when you create a new user in Windows XP it is give the “Default User” Profile.   That can be annoying since I not only use Steady State Restrictions but I also tweak the look and feel of my user accounts.  If I tweak a user account just the way I want it before doing anything with steady state, I copy that to the default user profile so every user I create after that point has the same settings and I don’t have to mess with each new user account.

     

    -Dan

     

    Thursday, October 2, 2008 4:11 PM

All replies

  •  

    Hi Mark, though I have not tested with third party program, such as Norton, it should work fine if you disable WDP before making an image and then deploy on other computers.

    Wednesday, October 1, 2008 3:38 AM
  • Mark,

    I have done it using sysprep and not using sysprep.  I have had the most success not using sysprep.  However it doesn't regenerate the SID on the computer.

     

    I think you are asking is is possible to just use GHOST and make an image without using sysprep.  The answer to that is yes.  My question to you is are you putting that image on IDENTICAL or extrememly identical hardware?  If your answer is yes it should work.  If it is no then you may need sysprep.

     

    Dan

     

    Wednesday, October 1, 2008 7:24 PM
  • Thanks for all the imput.We will need to be creating a new SID for each pc.

    Our current game plan is the following:

    - take of of the seven workstations and reformat and reload windows and all updates and basic software.

    - sysprep that drive.

    - create an image from that drive.

    - boot up system and create new SID

    - install Steady State and configure a user profile and lock down the profile and drive and test.

    - export the profile to a pen drive

    - The above work will setup our refernece pc.

     

    Onsite -

    - reimage each of the remaining workstations from the syspreped image

    - boot up and create new SID

    - Install Steady State

    - import the saved profile from the reference pc.

    - load up any specific software needed for each workstation

    - Test

    - lock down hdd and profile

     

    Does any one see any issues with this process or does anyone see a more efficient way to do this? Please post your thoughts and ideas.

     

    Thanks

    Mark Stamper

    Thursday, October 2, 2008 2:22 PM
  • In my experience exporting and then importing user profiles is a waste of time and doesn’t work well.  Also, why install Steady State each time if you dont' have to.

    Here is what I do:

    Our Procedure:

    Here is how I do it with Windows XP Pro

    Make one workstation your “Master Image”

    1.       Install Windows, Install Updates, and all necessary software

    2.       Create a new Default User Profile – I’ll talk about that later

    3.       Install Steady State, configure a user profile, set restrictions but NEVER LOCK the profile, test

    4.       Remove all restrictions in Steady State

    5.       Sysprep the computer

    6.       Create an image of the computer

    Our OnSite

    1.       Reimage each workstation with the “Master Image”

    2.       Install any custom software for each individual workstation – test

    3.       Set restrictions in Steady State – test

    4.       Lock the account – Test

    5.       Install WDP and enable

    I customize the Default User Profile in Windows XP.  There are steps to do this on Page 61 of the Steady State manual.  The previous page kinda talks about it but the idea is that when you create a new user in Windows XP it is give the “Default User” Profile.   That can be annoying since I not only use Steady State Restrictions but I also tweak the look and feel of my user accounts.  If I tweak a user account just the way I want it before doing anything with steady state, I copy that to the default user profile so every user I create after that point has the same settings and I don’t have to mess with each new user account.

     

    -Dan

     

    Thursday, October 2, 2008 4:11 PM
  • Mark and Dan

    I'm embarking on the same road that you have traveled..... Sean pointed me to this post.

    In retrospect, would you do anything different? I'm building the reference machine as we speak.

    How did you create and propagate the image? CD? DVD? Network? We are "serverless" at the library. My concern is differences between the machines - 3 are identical, 1 is identical but with a larger hard disk, and the other 2 are different - but all running XP Pro SP2 (or3).

    See my original post.......
    Best way to deploy SteadyState to 6 machines.....

    Thanks for comments.
    Monday, December 8, 2008 9:46 PM
  • I would be wary if you have machines that are not identical. You could potentially run into problems if the hardware is not identical, and the drivers. I use ShadowProtect 3.1 and have imaged my 'Master Image' to a flash drive, and have gone around each of my 17 machines and deployed them with no issues. I have SS locked down, with the restrictions still enabled and the profile locked, but not usind WDP, Deep Freeze 6.1, which I leave disabled. After reimaging a machine I boot into the Admin account, change the machine name and IP addy, and reboot again, and all works just fine. I double-check just to make sure, but nothing has happened to worry about, and I re-enable deep freeze and walk away.

    Hope this helps,

    Philip

    P.S. As for network imaging, you could look into Dell's ImageDirect, and see if that suits your needs. I looked into it, took the online "quiz", and thought it had potential. I'm not quite sure I understand why you would need to 'forward the image to your Dell coordinator' "for processing", and get permission from said coordinator to gain access to drivers? What's that about?
    Tuesday, December 9, 2008 4:05 AM
  • OK it looks like I spoke too soon. After setting up my machines with SS 2.5 and Deep Freeze 6.1931, I imaged the one pc using ShadowProtect 3.1 and backed up the image on a USB flash drive. All was OK but when I put the machine I imaged back out to the public, turned it on, froze the machine and rebooted, all the SS restrictions were disabled. The logoff buttons were back (on the start menu and the ctrl+all+del screen too). Everything was out of whack. I had to take the pc back, uninstall SS, DF, and set back any policies using Group Policy. Reinstalled SS, tested. Enabled my GP settings (removing the Logoff from the start menu, C+A+D screen, setting a home page, restricting drive C - that's it) and tested. So far so good. Installed DF, rebooted. Tested. Still fine. Rebooted a few times and still OK although I haven't thawed the machine and rebooted, to see if that does anything. I have Deep Freeze set to restart after logoff so I use that instead of SS (that setting I left off). I wonder if DF is the culprit, so I asked them. Still waiting for a reply. I'm asking here if anyone thinks maybe it was the act if imaging the drive that might have caused the glitches? When you image a pc with SS, should you turn everything off? I know that when I imaged the drive the first time I did NOT have the Lock the Profile checked off on the General tab. I don't have under Security Settings the ability to create files and folders on drive C checked off or do I have any drives restricted within SS's windows restrictions tab.

    Any ideas where I went wrong? Feel free to flame me, call me names, what have you
    Saturday, December 13, 2008 5:44 PM
  • Thanks for comment!

    How do you deal with the different XP product keys as you go from machine to machine?

    I can fit the image I want onto a flash drive - perhaps ShadowProtect is the way to get the image there?

    bg
    Sunday, December 14, 2008 6:26 PM