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Requesting feedback on recommendations for implementing Project Server 2010 first time RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I’ve been asked to help propose a Project Server 2010 implementation for a company's environment of under 1000 users, and which currently only has a few people using Project Standard 2007 (no Project Server, SharePoint, or SQL at present). There aren’t really any requirements except that they want to implement Project Server 2010, with SharePoint integration :)

    My task is to determine what hardware and software are needed, as well as a level of effort to not only implement Project Server but also train admins and users so they can commence pilot testing and then take things from there. I’ve never used Project Server/SharePoint/Project Professional 2010, only Project Server 2007, SharePoint 2007, and Project Professional 2007.

    Based on these vague tidbits, I’d like to ask you all’s thoughts on what I’ve put together to date, which follows. I figure someone out there has already implemented Project Server 2010 and might be able to offer insight on how it went and whether my ideas are in the right ballpark.

    From what I’ve read so far, I think they will need the following for their production environment:

    ·         Two servers (exceeding Microsoft’s system requirements of course, and supporting a 64-bit OS), comprising a small farm/dataset according to Microsoft’s capacity definitions and recommendations: one SQL server and one WFE/application (Project/SharePoint) server

    ·         Windows Server 2008 licenses (64-bit) – not sure if Enterprise, Std, or other would be best (we typically recommend Enterprise R2 at my location)

    ·         Project Server 2010 license

    ·         SharePoint Server 2010 Enterprise license

    ·         SQL Server 2008 license (64-bit) – could use SQL 2005 but figure might as well make use of the latest version

    ·         Project Professional 2010 licenses for the user base (could go with 2007 if price is a concern); I’m not completely clear on how much schedule creation/editing users can do within the PWA 2010 interface, so eventually it may be determined that some users get the Project Pro client and others can do what they need to do using PWA

    They will likely need additional hardware or software for testing servers depending on how they structure their test/dev/production environment, but I need more info on that from them before I modify my recommendations.

    The general tasks I’ve come up with regarding the implementation (outside of procuring the necessary hardware and software) are as follows, with duration estimates based on our PS 2007 implementation:

    ·         Initial deployment planning, incl. mapping the organization’s project-management approach to Project Server functionality, and role/report definition (10-20 days)

    ·         Build virtual test servers to start administrator familiarization (2-3 days)

    ·         Administrator training (4-5 days)

    ·         Additional deployment planning (5-10 days)

    ·         Server build with operating system (5 days)

    ·         Server burn-in (5 days)

    ·         Server installs and initial configuration (5 days, though potential to overlap subtasks to reduce time)

    o   Project Server/SharePoint (3 days)

    o   SQL (2 days)

    ·         Additional testing and configuration (10 days)

    ·         Pilot-user training (1-2 days), after which pilot testing commences

     

    It’s a lot of info, I know, but I appreciate any feedback or suggestions you might provide for implementing Project Server 2010 for the first time. Thanks!

     

    cheers /td

    Thursday, July 15, 2010 7:26 PM

Answers

  • If you've got solid Project 2007 experience, I'd recommend you go purchase MS Project Expert's book and read it cover to cover: http://projectserverbooks.com/books/implementingadministeringprojectserver2010.aspx  That'll give you a good sense of what pieces you have and what you're missing.

    Depending on how confident you feel, I'd still recommend that you engage a Microsoft partner with EPM experience to provide guidance.  You don't have to outsource all of the work, but at least work with someone who's done this before.

    If you don't have solid Project 2007 experience, then I'd go and find a partner who does.  These kind of implementations can be very sensitive - and are very easy to go off the rails from an organizational perspective (not technical).

    Your specs look more or less correct.  The delivery schedule looks a bit aggressive from my standpoint - it kind of depends on how mature the organization is going in.  From a training perspective, I'd point you to a blog post I wrote on the topic: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm/archive/2010/03/21/developing-an-epm-training-program-part-i.aspx

    Friday, July 16, 2010 12:17 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • If you've got solid Project 2007 experience, I'd recommend you go purchase MS Project Expert's book and read it cover to cover: http://projectserverbooks.com/books/implementingadministeringprojectserver2010.aspx  That'll give you a good sense of what pieces you have and what you're missing.

    Depending on how confident you feel, I'd still recommend that you engage a Microsoft partner with EPM experience to provide guidance.  You don't have to outsource all of the work, but at least work with someone who's done this before.

    If you don't have solid Project 2007 experience, then I'd go and find a partner who does.  These kind of implementations can be very sensitive - and are very easy to go off the rails from an organizational perspective (not technical).

    Your specs look more or less correct.  The delivery schedule looks a bit aggressive from my standpoint - it kind of depends on how mature the organization is going in.  From a training perspective, I'd point you to a blog post I wrote on the topic: http://blogs.catapultsystems.com/epm/archive/2010/03/21/developing-an-epm-training-program-part-i.aspx

    Friday, July 16, 2010 12:17 AM
    Moderator
  • Andrew,

    Thank you for that information, and I concur with your points. Was just listening to the Microsoft podcast about the cultural/organizational aspects of planning a Project Server 2010 implementation.

    cheers /td

    Friday, July 16, 2010 3:07 PM
  • Trevor

    How did you get on ? What did you end up buying, how long did it take and what were the gotchas ?

    Thursday, December 15, 2011 4:06 AM