locked
Magically Disappearing CDROM RRS feed

  • Question

  • A clientsite where I built their custom workstations recently started complaining about their CDROM devices not working, in spite of the fact that I recently reinstalled Windows 10 on one of those workstations using a DVD.

    On investigation it turned out Windows 10 wasn't even showing the CD/DVD drive as existing, even though it was there at the BIOS level.

    Fixing required moving the SATA plug for the CD/DVD device from an "odd numbered" or "slave" port to an "even numbered" or "master port" as with IDE.  Just moving it to another SATA port did nothing.  Moving it specifically to a "master" port (the first port on a stack of 2) brought it back to Windows 10.

    The other machine still showed the CD/DVD device, but any media/disk put into it was inaccessible - no read permission at all.  I tried WMP and VLC with an audio CD and no joy.

    Exact same fix.  Not just any other SATA port, but specifically a master port.

    The 2 affected systems were completely different mainboards and CPUs.  A 3rd system, totally unaffected, is running the same version/update level of Win10 with identical hardware to the first machine (which was affected).

    Less a question than a bug report which Microsoft's witless 2020 executives will ignore, but maybe somebody else can benefit from when they hit the same problem.


    Tuesday, February 4, 2020 2:46 AM

Answers

  • Thank you for sharing the good experience on how to deal with CDROM devices not working in Windows but can be recognized in BIOS, the resolution:

    Moving the SATA plug for the CD/DVD device from a slave port to a master port as with IDE is an effective method

    Hope other forum users who meet with the similar situation can get help from this case.

    On the other hand, have you contacted the manufacturer support? What about their reply about this situation? After all, if reinstall OS still cannot resolve issue, it should not be a system issue.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Wednesday, February 5, 2020 1:17 AM
  • Thank you for sharing the good experience on how to deal with CDROM devices not working in Windows but can be recognized in BIOS, the resolution:

    Moving the SATA plug for the CD/DVD device from a slave port to a master port as with IDE is an effective method

    Hope other forum users who meet with the similar situation can get help from this case.

    On the other hand, have you contacted the manufacturer support? What about their reply about this situation? After all, if reinstall OS still cannot resolve issue, it should not be a system issue.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Reinstalling the OS was not the fix or an attempt at a fix.  The recent OS reinstall was just a coincidence that proved the CDROM worked fine until receiving/applying recent Windows 10 Updates.  Both BIOSes (mainboard firmware) recognized and utilized the CDROM just fine.

    Just shutting the system down and moving the SATA cable from the even-numbered "slave" SATA port (where the local HDD was on the odd-numbered or "master" SATA port) to a different odd-numbered "master port" on the mainboard fixed the problem.  ie The ports on these boards are labelled 1 & 2 and that's one group, 1 is the master and 2 is the slave.  There are 3 more SATA groups such as 3&4 and 5&6, where 5 is at the bottom and 6 is at the top (ie master and slave).  Some mainboards may label them 0&1, 2&3, in which case the even numbers would be the "masters."

    The fix is specifically to make sure the CD/DVD device is connected to a "master" port even though that's a PATA (aka IDE) concept and is not relevant or applicable to SATA controllers at all. 

    Otherwise as I said, the 2 affected systems had different specific symptoms except the end result of a totally unusable CD/DVD R/W device in Windows.  The 2 affected systems were completely different hardware too, one with an MSI mainboard and the other with a Gigabyte mainboard.  The only thing they have in common is both being in the same building and both being Windows 10 with the newest updates.




    Wednesday, February 5, 2020 1:40 AM

All replies

  • Thank you for sharing the good experience on how to deal with CDROM devices not working in Windows but can be recognized in BIOS, the resolution:

    Moving the SATA plug for the CD/DVD device from a slave port to a master port as with IDE is an effective method

    Hope other forum users who meet with the similar situation can get help from this case.

    On the other hand, have you contacted the manufacturer support? What about their reply about this situation? After all, if reinstall OS still cannot resolve issue, it should not be a system issue.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Wednesday, February 5, 2020 1:17 AM
  • Thank you for sharing the good experience on how to deal with CDROM devices not working in Windows but can be recognized in BIOS, the resolution:

    Moving the SATA plug for the CD/DVD device from a slave port to a master port as with IDE is an effective method

    Hope other forum users who meet with the similar situation can get help from this case.

    On the other hand, have you contacted the manufacturer support? What about their reply about this situation? After all, if reinstall OS still cannot resolve issue, it should not be a system issue.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.


    Reinstalling the OS was not the fix or an attempt at a fix.  The recent OS reinstall was just a coincidence that proved the CDROM worked fine until receiving/applying recent Windows 10 Updates.  Both BIOSes (mainboard firmware) recognized and utilized the CDROM just fine.

    Just shutting the system down and moving the SATA cable from the even-numbered "slave" SATA port (where the local HDD was on the odd-numbered or "master" SATA port) to a different odd-numbered "master port" on the mainboard fixed the problem.  ie The ports on these boards are labelled 1 & 2 and that's one group, 1 is the master and 2 is the slave.  There are 3 more SATA groups such as 3&4 and 5&6, where 5 is at the bottom and 6 is at the top (ie master and slave).  Some mainboards may label them 0&1, 2&3, in which case the even numbers would be the "masters."

    The fix is specifically to make sure the CD/DVD device is connected to a "master" port even though that's a PATA (aka IDE) concept and is not relevant or applicable to SATA controllers at all. 

    Otherwise as I said, the 2 affected systems had different specific symptoms except the end result of a totally unusable CD/DVD R/W device in Windows.  The 2 affected systems were completely different hardware too, one with an MSI mainboard and the other with a Gigabyte mainboard.  The only thing they have in common is both being in the same building and both being Windows 10 with the newest updates.




    Wednesday, February 5, 2020 1:40 AM
  • Bumped because this problem just repeated 2020-06-08 with a pretty newish build of Windows 10 - installed directly from a downloaded ISO of Windows 10.0.18363.  The ISO of course labels itself 1909.

    I completely wiped the HDD about 2 months ago (a full-on 0x00-writethrough across the entire HDD) and reinstalled Windows 10 1909.  The system worked just fine from then until some recent point after downloading automatic updates from MS.  It's not my own system so I have no idea exactly what update or exactly when this occurred, just that the problem is caused by a Windows update that previously affected other Win10 systems with completely different users and hardware configurations.

    The symptom:  SATA CD/DVD drive quits working.  Completely disappears from "My PC" and other filesystem explorer menus.  Device manager shows it when I set "show hidden devices" but then trying to examine it, Windows says the device is not connected.  It in fact was connected.

    The fix:  Move the SATA data cable from a "slave" or "secondary" SATA port to any other "master" port.  Yes, these are non-concepts with SATA.  Yes, this is how it works. 

    ie:  If your SATA ports are numbered 0, 1, 2, 3 then 0 and 2 are "masters" and 1 and 3 are "slaves" or "secondaries."  If the CD/DVD hardware is plugged into 1 or 3, whatever Win10 update causes this is making Windows reject the connected hardware as if it wasn't even there anymore.  The CD/DVD's SATA absolutely, positively MUST be connected to port 0 or port 2.  After moving the SATA Data plug and turning the machine back on, the DVD is right back in My PC and other explorer menus.  It works fine.

    Other devices such as HDDs continue to work fine on those same "secondary" SATA connections.

    This is the most ridiculous problem I have ever heard of.


    Before you can learn anything new you have to learn that there's stuff you don't know.

    Monday, June 8, 2020 9:12 PM