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Outlook Delivery Notifications/ Read Reciepts RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello

    We are running Exchange 2007 SP1 and Outlook 2007 SP2.

    When I compose a new message in Outlook, I have the option to request a Delivery Reciept and also a Read Reciept.

    But I don't understand how these can work in the case of two seperate Exchange organisations.

    Let's say I (kam@domain.com) send a message to another user at a different company (jane@company.com). I tick the options in Outlook to request a delivery recipt and read recpt.

    1. Does anyone know how these actually work? I've searched the internet but can't find much.

    2. At what point is the Delivery Recpt? When the message is accepted by the recipient's SMTP gateway or when the message is delivered to the recipient's mailbox?

    3. Likewise for Read Recpt?

    4. Will these two functions work if the recipient is on a non-Exch system?

    5. Is the Delivery Rcpt guaranteed to work?

    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 7:55 PM

Answers

  • On Sun, 7-Feb-10 13:22:21 GMT, Sheen1990 wrote:

    >
    >
    >Thanks Rich, appreciate the answer.Ok, so let's say that a message is sent in this manner:Source Exchange > SMTP Relay > SMTP Relay 2 > Target Exchange*All* of these MTA's advertise that they send a DSN (for argument's sake).
    >
    >In which case, wouldn't the user expect to see multiple DSN's from each hop?

    No, just one DSN from "Target Exchange".

    >Why do they only recv one that is from the last MTA that provides the DSN functionality?

    Because none of the others are responsible for actually delivering the
    message to its final destination. They've accepted the responsibility
    to either relay the message to the next hop or tell you they couldn't
    do that. They'll only report back to the sender if there's a problem.

    One of the problems (not in the situation you just described) may be
    that you asked for a DSN but the next hop doesn't advertise that
    capability -- so that responsibility falls to the last relay that
    accepted the message and agreed to pass along your request for a DSN.

    Have a look at this for answers to other questions about the use of
    DSN and its oprional keywords:

    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1891.txt
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    • Marked as answer by Sheen1990 Sunday, February 7, 2010 10:52 PM
    Sunday, February 7, 2010 5:15 PM

All replies

  • On Tue, 26-Jan-10 19:55:20 GMT, Sheen1990 wrote:

    >
    >
    >Hello
    >
    >We are running Exchange 2007 SP1 and Outlook 2007 SP2.
    >
    >When I compose a new message in Outlook, I have the option to request a Delivery Reciept and also a Read Reciept.
    >
    >But I don't understand how these can work in the case of two seperate Exchange organisations.
    >
    >Let's say I (kam@domain.com) send a message to another user at a different company (jane@company.com). I tick the options in Outlook to request a delivery recipt and read recpt.
    >
    >1. Does anyone know how these actually work? I've searched the internet but can't find much.




    >
    >2. At what point is the Delivery Recpt? When the message is accepted by the recipient's SMTP gateway or when the message is delivered to the recipient's mailbox?

    A Delivery Receipt is a specialized form of Delivery Service
    Notification. When the e-mail is sent to the next hop the RCPT TO
    command includes the "NOTIFY=" keyword. See RFC1891 for details.

    Not all SMTP servers offer the DSN keyword, so you may not get the
    delivery receipt even if you ask for it.

    A delivery receipt only affirms that the message was accepted,
    rejected, or delayed. A NDR (another specialized form of DSN) may, or
    may not, be sent if the message couldn't be delivered (many spam
    filters just drop messages -- it makes little sense to send them to
    spammers).

    >3. Likewise for Read Recpt?

    Read Receipts are typically generated by the MUA (i.e. the e-mail
    client). Again, whether or not you get one depends on whether the
    email system removes the request from the e-mail headers, and whether
    ot not the e-mail client is configured to send them, or whether the
    user decides to allow the MUA to send them.

    >4. Will these two functions work if the recipient is on a non-Exch system?

    Yes. But the answer is really "it depends".

    >5. Is the Delivery Rcpt guaranteed to work?

    If you ask for one you should get one. But understand that it may come
    from ANY MTA that handles the message if the next hop doesn't offer to
    send a DSN. In that case the DSN you get will say the message was
    delivered to a system the won't send a DSN.
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    Tuesday, January 26, 2010 10:05 PM
  • Thanks!

    "A Delivery Receipt is a specialized form of Delivery Service
    Notification. When the e-mail is sent to the next hop the RCPT TO
    command includes the "NOTIFY=" keyword. See RFC1891 for details."

    So- really- the Delivery Reciept just shows that the message has been relayed on by the next hop...not that it has reached its destination?

    For instance, we use MessageLabs to scan our outgoing mail; Outlook > Exchange > MessageLabs > Internet

    If I ask for a Delivery recipit, the notification is just that MessageLabs have relayed the message on?
    Thursday, January 28, 2010 11:59 PM
  • On Thu, 28-Jan-10 23:59:13 GMT, Sheen1990 wrote:

    >Thanks!"A Delivery Receipt is a specialized form of Delivery ServiceNotification. When the e-mail is sent to the next hop the RCPT TOcommand includes the "NOTIFY=" keyword. See RFC1891 for details."So- really- the Delivery Reciept just shows that the message has been relayed on by the next hop...not that it has reached its destination?

    If every machine between the sending and target MTAs agrees that it
    will send a DSN then you'll get just one -- from the target MTA.

    If one of the MTAs doesn't offer DSNs then the last machine that's
    accepted responsibility for delivering the message will send a DSN
    saying it delivered the message to the next hop but that the next hop
    doesn't support DSNs. That the last DSN you'll get for that message.

    >For instance, we use MessageLabs to scan our outgoing mail; Outlook > Exchange > MessageLabs > InternetIf I ask for a Delivery recipit, the notification is just that MessageLabs have relayed the message on?

    If I were to send an e-mail to someone in the domain messagelabes.com
    I wouldn't expect to receive a Delivery Notice from them. Their
    servers don't adverise that they'll send a DSN. They offer TLS,
    PIPeLINING, and 8BITMIME features -- but no DSN.

    220 server-11.tower-36.messagelabs.com ESMTP
    ehlo XXXXX.com
    250-server-11.tower-36.messagelabs.com
    250-STARTTLS
    250-PIPELINING
    250 8BITMIME
    quit
    221 Closing connection. Good bye.
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    Friday, January 29, 2010 3:31 AM
  • Thanks Rich, appreciate the answer.

    Ok, so let's say that a message is sent in this manner:

    Source Exchange > SMTP Relay > SMTP Relay 2 > Target Exchange

    *All* of these MTA's advertise that they send a DSN (for argument's sake).

    In which case, wouldn't the user expect to see multiple DSN's from each hop? Why do they only recv one that is from the last MTA that provides the DSN functionality?

    Sunday, February 7, 2010 1:22 PM
  • On Sun, 7-Feb-10 13:22:21 GMT, Sheen1990 wrote:

    >
    >
    >Thanks Rich, appreciate the answer.Ok, so let's say that a message is sent in this manner:Source Exchange > SMTP Relay > SMTP Relay 2 > Target Exchange*All* of these MTA's advertise that they send a DSN (for argument's sake).
    >
    >In which case, wouldn't the user expect to see multiple DSN's from each hop?

    No, just one DSN from "Target Exchange".

    >Why do they only recv one that is from the last MTA that provides the DSN functionality?

    Because none of the others are responsible for actually delivering the
    message to its final destination. They've accepted the responsibility
    to either relay the message to the next hop or tell you they couldn't
    do that. They'll only report back to the sender if there's a problem.

    One of the problems (not in the situation you just described) may be
    that you asked for a DSN but the next hop doesn't advertise that
    capability -- so that responsibility falls to the last relay that
    accepted the message and agreed to pass along your request for a DSN.

    Have a look at this for answers to other questions about the use of
    DSN and its oprional keywords:

    http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1891.txt
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    • Marked as answer by Sheen1990 Sunday, February 7, 2010 10:52 PM
    Sunday, February 7, 2010 5:15 PM