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How can I delegate a meeting invite in Outlook 2010 / Exchange

    Question

  • I've just migrated from Lotus Notes, however I can see any option to delegate a meeting invite to enable someone else to attend a meeting on my behalf.

    How can I do this in Outlook 2010?

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 7:33 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Thanks for your update and clarification.

    Exchange has no this kind of feature to assign a meeting or task to another user through a meeting request. You may forward the meeting request (it is not recommended), or click Propose another time to send an email to the meeting organizer with your reason or comment.

    Your understanding would be appreciated.


    Fiona
    Saturday, September 24, 2011 8:03 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi

    Here is the full  detailed option on delegates permission in outlook 2010

    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/allow-someone-else-to-manage-your-mail-and-calendar-HA010355554.aspx

    Thank you.

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 8:11 AM
  • I've just migrated from Lotus Notes, however I can see any option to delegate a meeting invite to enable someone else to attend a meeting on my behalf.

    How can I do this in Outlook 2010?


    Just logon Outlook as the executive account, add the delegate and then grant the proper permission (it is recommended the Editor on Calendar folder).

    After doing this, the delegate will receive the meeting request sent to the executive, and can accept/deny the request for executive. The calendar folder of exective will be updated accordingly.

    All the best.


    Fiona
    Saturday, September 24, 2011 7:18 AM
    Moderator
  • I think you have misunderstood my question.

    I have a meeting invite in my Inbox for a meeting which I can not attend.

    Instead of Accepting or Declining I want to Delegate the invite for someone else to attend (this was a feature in Notes)

    Saturday, September 24, 2011 7:46 AM
  • Hi,

    Thanks for your update and clarification.

    Exchange has no this kind of feature to assign a meeting or task to another user through a meeting request. You may forward the meeting request (it is not recommended), or click Propose another time to send an email to the meeting organizer with your reason or comment.

    Your understanding would be appreciated.


    Fiona
    Saturday, September 24, 2011 8:03 AM
    Moderator
  • Fiona

    Using 'Forward seems to work fine

    1. Tew attendee can accept / decline the meeting invite
    2. The organiser is told that the invite has been forwarded to a new attendee and the attendance list reflects this

    So why is using "Forward" not recommended?

    Ed.

    Thursday, October 20, 2011 9:32 AM
  • If you receive an invitation for a meeting and believe someone else should also attend it, instead of forwarding the meeting request to that person, ask the meeting organizer to add that person to the attendee list, and then to send everyone an updated meeting request. This avoids suprising the organizer with an unexpected attendee and helps prevent lost meeting requests.

    Refer to: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/outlook-meeting-requests-essential-dos-and-donts-HA001127678.aspx


    Fiona
    Friday, October 21, 2011 2:27 AM
    Moderator
  • I understand that option too, but there are several circumstances when I would just want to 'forward' the meeting request instead. While this seems to work fine, I would like to understand if there is a technical reason why it should not be used.

    Sunday, October 23, 2011 7:27 AM
  • I've just migrated from Lotus Notes, however I can see any option to delegate a meeting invite to enable someone else to attend a meeting on my behalf.

    How can I do this in Outlook 2010?


    Just logon Outlook as the executive account, add the delegate and then grant the proper permission (it is recommended the Editor on Calendar folder).

    After doing this, the delegate will receive the meeting request sent to the executive, and can accept/deny the request for executive. The calendar folder of exective will be updated accordingly.

    All the best.


    Fiona
    You appear to be dancing around the real issue. Any hopes of Microsoft adding the "proxy" (attend in my stead" feature in Outlook 2013?
    Thursday, February 02, 2012 11:09 AM
  • Works great in Lotus, need this feature in Outlook to work the same way.  Simple request.

    Monday, April 16, 2012 8:23 PM
  • I agree!  Outlook is superior in many ways, but the ability to "delegate" the meeting request to another member of your organization is a staple in the Lotus Notes world!
    Tuesday, August 21, 2012 3:41 PM
  • This is very inconvient to ask someone esle attends on my be half.   I was not a fan of Lotus Notes but that is one feature that is sorly missed the abiltity to give someone a meeting I cannot attend.
    Friday, September 27, 2013 5:23 PM
  • Think about this:  I invite a group of people to a meeting.  I've considered the composition of the meeting carefully because I know it costs the organisation to have people sitting in a meeting room for an hour or however long.  I only invite the people I know I need there.

    One of my invitees is too busy to attend, so they think their assistant can go in their stead.  Seriously? Suppose there are reasons for that person to NOT attend? Otherwise where would you draw the line?  Would you delegate another child to attend my children's birthday party?  

    Instead of clicking a button to opt out and send a delegate, would it not be more polite to decline the meeting, and contact the organiser to explain they may consider Miss X as a suitable delegate. then let THEM extend an invitation themselves.

    Bottom Line: Maybe it's inappropriate to delegate someone to attend someone else's meeting. Let the organiser decide.  And just because Lotus Notes gave the user a button to do something doesn't mean it's polite.

     
    Wednesday, November 27, 2013 5:33 AM
  • The argument by Chris for not delegating is I feel shortsighted.  Working in large organisations people work in teams and are moved from project or roles continuously.  The communication of role changes etc. in any corporation can potentially not be what it should be.  Being able to delegate a meeting which you have been invited to is a practical way of sending the correct person to the meeting.

    To add as well, in Lotus Notes when you delegate a meeting the organiser has full visibility of who delegated the meeting and who the meeting was delegated to.  The person delegating can also add comments as to why they delegated.  Therefore the organiser can remove the delegated invitee if appropriate.  Also if the meeting is rescheduled and the only reason the original invitee delegated was because they really wanted to go but had a previous committment so they sent a collegue to represent them, they will be notified of the reschedule and they have the opportunity of being able to attend the meeting.   

    If outlook users where given the functionality of delegation, they would love it.  It is a practical corporate tool for an everchanging workplace, to see it as inappropriate is a bit like saying it is inappropriate to communicate to someone via chat or email, we should ring instead! 

    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 2:38 AM
  • As someone whose organization also recently migrated from Lotus Notes to Exchange, I too would like to see this feature implemented. 

    Several of our mid-managers have asked us about this (I'm in the IT department and was part of our rollout to Exchange/Outlook), as it is convenient for them to delegate attendance to an assistant manager or supervisor in the event that they cannot attend.

    And I would have to disagree with Chris - it is by no means impolite to send a delegate in your place. With constantly changing schedules and priority lists (some of those handed down by senior management or higher), the ability to quickly and easily delegate meeting attendance is a must-have.

    Tuesday, January 21, 2014 10:15 PM
  • Microsoft should consider adding a delegation feature.  It is common amongst other calendar software (i.e. Lotus Notes) and as a manager I would like to be able to delegate to my staff regularly.  Instead I have to accept and forward the meeting which does two things that are wrong:

    1)  Makes the requestor think I am attending.

    2)  Not clearly notify the requestor of the delegation including forwarding future updates to the meeting to the delegate.

    Microsoft please consider adding this feature to existing product via product update.

    Monday, February 10, 2014 4:52 PM
  • Wow... this is disappointing. We just transitioned from Notes to Outlook and I'm stunned to find out there's no way to delegate a meeting.

    Here's another scenario - there's a regularly scheduled meeting for tomorrow morning. When we can't attend, we are required to send a representative. I'm out of the office tomorrow. My associate is fully competent to represent in my place and vote on the issues as if he were me. I've informed him on the issues and he knows the objectives of our group. I can forward the message, but I'm not confident that it will properly invite him or that he'll get the updates if the room or time changes.  

    Oh, and the person who created the meeting is also on vacation all week. So I can't ask them to just invite someone else.
    • Edited by tvjames Thursday, April 24, 2014 11:27 PM
    Thursday, April 24, 2014 11:26 PM
  • Simply "Forward" the meeting request in Outlook 2010 (and ignore the previous discussions).

    This functionally is equivalent to "Delegate" in Lotus Notes if the following conditions are true:

    • The attendee is using Microsoft Outlook 2010 or newer.
    • The attendee is in the same Exchange organization as the organizer (or if the Exchange server allows meeting forward notifications to be sent to remote domains).
    • The organizer is using a Microsoft Outlook client.

    See details in "Forwarding meeting requests" in http (colon slash slash) office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook-help/best-practices-when-using-the-outlook-calendar-HA104004449.aspx

    • Proposed as answer by GeneMiller Wednesday, May 07, 2014 9:57 PM
    Wednesday, May 07, 2014 9:56 PM
  • This "answer" is NOT CORRECT if the attendee is using Microsoft Outlook 2010 or newer.

    See my proposed answer, sent today May 6, 2014.


    • Edited by GeneMiller Wednesday, May 07, 2014 10:03 PM
    Wednesday, May 07, 2014 10:02 PM
  • Surely, if you can come up with the idea to invite children for your own childrens birthdayparties via Outlook Calender invites, you can also think of a good reason for the feature, right?

    Tuesday, February 03, 2015 12:44 PM