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Configure AD DC which is running as sub domain RRS feed

  • Question

  • Greetings,

    I am building a new AD network. I have created the DNS zone (corp.example.com) which is serving my local network. And, I have a domain already registered under (example.com) in the internet. In the (example.com) there are many (A) records, one is (mail.example.com).

    I want my mail server to be hosted locally, so if I created a mail server and join it to my domain, the FQDN will be (mail.corp.example.com) which is not correct in my case as I have mobile users and the mail server should be (mail.example.com).

    What is the correct way to configure my local DNS server? I have went through a lot of articles, but got confused sincerely. I am running Windows Server 2016.

    Regards,

    Monday, June 17, 2019 10:07 AM

All replies

  • Hello Dani Bachour,

    Thank you for posting in this forum.

    What is your current problem?

    You registered a domain name on the Internet called (corp.example.com) and used it as the name of your DNS zone. Then the records under this zone must be (xx.corp.example.com).

    (example.com) is also a name of a DNS zone, and this DNS server is hosted by others. So the (mail.example.com) record is hosted by that DNS server.

    Best Regards,

    Leon


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    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 8:37 AM
  • Greetings,

    I registered my domain (example.com) on the Internet. Then, I created a domain for my LAN (corp.example.com). I want to host my mail server locally, in this case the machine FQDN will be (mail.corp.example.com) but on the internet the FQDN for mail will be (mail.example.com). So, is it safe to create a primary zone (example.com) in my local DNS server and copy all the DNS records from the Internet domain to my local DNS server to make both domain work properly?

    Tuesday, June 18, 2019 2:34 PM
  • Greetings,

    I am getting more confused about your description.

    1. { You register the domain (example.com) on the Internet, why not simply use it as your local DNS server?

    There already is a record called (mail.example.com), then you can simply join your mail server to it and call it (mail2.example.com) }

    2. { How many DNS servers do you have? What is their name? Is corp.example.com just a subdomain of example.com, a DNS server? If so, then you should be able to fulfill your needs by creating a CNAME record. }

    3. { What is the "Internet domain"? Wouldn't it be better to create a secondary zone if you were copying records from another DNS server? The secondary zone has the automatic update function. }

    Best Regards,

    Leon


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    Wednesday, June 19, 2019 7:06 AM
  • Greetings Leon,

    I have followed this link for best practice to name internal domain  AD: Best Practice for Internal Domain and Network Name. So, I ended up configuring my local domain (corp.example.com) as sub domain from the registered domain name (example.com) in the internet. I hope it is clear till now.

    I want to serve my mails locally, so let's say I will create a machine (MAIL) and join in to my domain. In this case, the FQDN for that machine will be (MAIL.corp.example.com). My question, is it safe to create another DNS zone (example.com) in my local DNS server? So, in this case, I will add an (A) records with the internal IP of the mail server and make it (MAIL.example.com), which will help the mobile devices to reach the mail server whether they are inside my network or outside it.

    Thursday, June 20, 2019 8:46 AM
  • Hi Dani,

    Your idea is not feasible.

    It is recommended that you apply for a public IP address for your local mail server via the public domain(example.com), and then ask them to create an MX record which points to this public IP under DNS server(example.com). In this way, the external client can find the mail server through the public network IP. The internal client can find the mail server through the local DNS server.

    Best Regards,

    Leon


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    Friday, June 21, 2019 9:47 AM
  • Hi Leon,

    That's my point. My internal DNS server will have the (A) for that machine as (MAIL.corp.example.com). So, I am obliged to add (example.com) as DNS zone into my internal DNS server and create an (A) record to point to the mail server internally as (MAIL.example.com)

    Regards,

    Friday, June 21, 2019 7:20 PM
  • Hi Dani,

    First, creating a DNS zone with the same name as the public network on the local DNS server can cause a lot of trouble. Then, how can an external client contact the mail server in your intranet?

    Best Regards,

    Leon


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    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, June 24, 2019 9:29 AM