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How to relocate drivers in driver package to new data source directory RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I would like to relocate the drivers in my driver packages to a new data source location on my server. I need to make sure that the drivers are purged from the old location as well to prevent wasted disk space. What is the best way to accomplish this?

    I can think of a few different operations I could perform but not sure which will give me the best results.

    • Do I delete all of the drivers from the database, change the data source directory and then import the drivers once again? I have a feeling this is the only sure way to make sure that the old location has all of the drivers deleted.
    • Is it enough to remove all drivers from the driver package, change the data source directory, then add the drivers back to the package? Will this also delete the drivers from the old location? With the drivers removed from the package, should I update distribution points before adding the drivers back to the driver package?

    I could experiment with many different methods but I really need to do it right the first try in the interest of saving time not to mention that I need to disrupt OSD as little as possible.

    I have done some searching on the internet and haven't really came up with questions like this. Any help I can get would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks,

    Rob

    Friday, April 6, 2012 3:35 PM

Answers

  • Changing a driver package location is just moving the folder physically and then updating the location on the Data Source Path on the package in the UI.

    Note that if you simply move the original import files without updating their source locations (using the script above or a similar technique) you will have issues when you try to use those drivers for boot images or insert them into new packages).

    Another note, I hope you didn't use the same location for both of these -- that technicaly can work but mixes the two different sets of files together and essentially doubles the size of your package because the package will actually include the drivers twice.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com | Twitter @JasonSandys

    • Marked as answer by robwm1 Friday, April 6, 2012 5:25 PM
    Friday, April 6, 2012 4:28 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I think you know this, but just to make sure (and for others that read this), there are really two different paths you must worry about:

    - The original location you imported the drivers from. This is the Driver Source Location.

    - The package location that stores the drivers after you add them to the package. This is the Driver *Package* location.

    The second is relatively easy to change and I'm pretty sure that's not what you are specifically asking with this question.

    For the driver source location though, check out this script: http://myitforum.com/cs2/blogs/cnackers/archive/2011/08/12/configmgr-update-driver-source-paths-script.aspx.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com | Twitter @JasonSandys

    Friday, April 6, 2012 4:12 PM
    Moderator
  • Actually, I am referring to the Driver Package location as you defined (the folder names look like GUIDs). The location where I import the drivers from has been moved already but I failed to move the Driver Package location at the same time (data source directory in the driver package properties).

    I hope that clarifies my question.

    Friday, April 6, 2012 4:23 PM
  • Changing a driver package location is just moving the folder physically and then updating the location on the Data Source Path on the package in the UI.

    Note that if you simply move the original import files without updating their source locations (using the script above or a similar technique) you will have issues when you try to use those drivers for boot images or insert them into new packages).

    Another note, I hope you didn't use the same location for both of these -- that technicaly can work but mixes the two different sets of files together and essentially doubles the size of your package because the package will actually include the drivers twice.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com | Twitter @JasonSandys

    • Marked as answer by robwm1 Friday, April 6, 2012 5:25 PM
    Friday, April 6, 2012 4:28 PM
    Moderator
  • The file location that I import from is in a different folder than where the driver packages place their data; something like below:

    \\sccm07\drivers\import_source
    \\sccm07\packages\driver_packages

    Is this what you are referring to? The two sources are in different folders.

    Regarding your comment on import files - I have been warned about moving these files without changing the path on the imported drivers in the console. Thanks for mentioning this though as it is very important.

    So you're saying that it's safe to simply move the driver package source files to another location and update the path in driver package properties? My only concern there is whether I have undesired data in that location. It looks like the data in the original folder location contains exactly what is shown in the imported driver list in the console though. Shouldn't be an issue in this case.

    This leads to a couple of more questions. I have a few of these drivers in the boot images, will moving the physical location of this folder affect them? Lastly, after moving the driver package folder to the new location, is it a good idea to update distribtuion points?

    Friday, April 6, 2012 4:59 PM
  • (First, please forgive me for stating things you already know -- I do it so no bad assumptions are made and for the benefit of others who read this thread who may not know.)

    Good on the two locations. I've seen people use the same location before and it ain't pretty.

    Yes, changing the package path is that easy. In CM07, a package is literally just a collection of files defined by a common folder. There's nothing special about the path or folder itself and the package will actually include all of the files in the folder no matter how they got there (Johan's driver method takes advantage of this fact which has technically been classified as a bug by the product group.)

    As for injecting drivers into boot images, those come from the original import location and not the package location. Once injected, nothing affects them but if you update your boot image it will re-inject them from this original source/import location. Of course, if you've moved or deleted the original source locations, you've got issues at this point.

    Changing the package source location will automatically trigger an undate package operation wihich will verify that all of the DPs have the current content as defined by whats in the package source location -- so no need to do this manually. You can verify by checking distmgr.log.


    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com | Twitter @JasonSandys

    Friday, April 6, 2012 5:13 PM
    Moderator
  • I appreciate that you make no assumptions. It also reaffirms my knowledge as well so no offense taken.

    I guess I may have been over-thinking this a little. I didn't realize that this task was actually just this simple. It's rare with SCCM that anything is this simple so I have became a bit wary with this system.

    Thank you very much for helping me out on this one!

    Friday, April 6, 2012 5:24 PM
  • Have a similar situation/question. We are currently on W10 x64 build 1709 and will be moving to 1809 shortly. Our current SCCM build is 1806. We built a task sequence for 1809 and created driver packages for the each model of hardware that we are supporting. We have another task sequence that was originally only built for vdi without all those driver packages. We were getting errors with the one task sequence when it was going out trying to grab Windows Updates. The second task sequence was not seeing the Windows Updates error. Our SCCM guy who created those images and task sequences is now talking about using that task sequence for everything going forward. My question is, " Is there a way to just move/copy/etc the driver packages from that task sequence to the new task sequence or am I stucking creating new driver packages for each and every machine we are supporting"

    Ric Nagy

    Tuesday, August 6, 2019 7:53 PM
  • First note is that CM 1806 doesn't support Win 10 1809. Also, 1806 will be out of support in about 6 months so it's time to start planning your update to CM 1902 or 1906.

    Next, copying task between task sequence is easy and built-in. Just open both task sequences and copy and paste as normal. The target and source TSes must both remain open for the full copy and past to succeed though.


    Jason | https://home.configmgrftw.com | @jasonsandys

    Wednesday, August 7, 2019 12:36 AM
    Moderator