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Microsoft Visio 2010 - Disable Auto Size feature globally

    Question

  • Hello,

    I am a patent attorney that frequently uses Visio to create drawings.  I recently upgraded from Visio 2007 to Visio 2010 and have encountered an annoyance that I would like to fix.  Whenever I open up a Visio drawing (which was created using Visio 2007), the auto size feature is automatically turned on for each page by default.

    I know that I can turn it off on a page level by going to the design tab and and selecting the feature for each page individually or I can go to page setup and turn it off for each page individually.  I would like to have it turned off at a global level so that by default it is turned off, rather than turned on.

    In my field, we are required to work within certain page parameters, so that auto size feature, while it may be useful in some fields, is a complete hinderance in mine.

    Thank you in advance for any assistance you might be able to provide.

    Tuesday, November 23, 2010 2:09 PM

Answers

  • There is no way to turn off the feature permenantly, the suggested workaround is to use a template and turn the feature off in the template. Any time you use the template, Autosize should be off.
    John... the original Visio MVP (since 1993) Visio.MVPs.org
    • Marked as answer by Sally Tang Wednesday, November 24, 2010 2:17 AM
    Tuesday, November 23, 2010 8:39 PM

All replies

  • There is no way to turn off the feature permenantly, the suggested workaround is to use a template and turn the feature off in the template. Any time you use the template, Autosize should be off.
    John... the original Visio MVP (since 1993) Visio.MVPs.org
    • Marked as answer by Sally Tang Wednesday, November 24, 2010 2:17 AM
    Tuesday, November 23, 2010 8:39 PM
  • How does creating a template help with opening already existing Visio diagrams, created in versions prior to 2010?

    I have many large diagrams that I am now updating with Visio 2010, and I have to turn Auto Size off for every page in order to maintain the required page dimensions.

    Any further clarification would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

    Monday, January 3, 2011 10:28 PM
  • You can simplify things by looping through the pages on the current document and setting

     PagObj.AutoSize = False

    Or, you can do the same for all the VSDs in the current directory

    Sub ProcessDirectory()

    ' Process all the Visio drawings in the current directory

    ' Look in the current directory for Visio files and process each one by
    ' passing each page to a subroutine

    ' Remember to ignore processing this Visio file.

    ' John Marshall

    Dim CurFileName As String
    Dim curPageIndx As Integer
    Dim currentDoc As String
    Dim docObj As Visio.Document
    Dim docsObj As Visio.Documents
    Dim PagObj As Visio.Page
    Dim PagsObj As Visio.Pages
    Dim PathFileName As String
    Dim PathName As String

    currentDoc = ActiveDocument.Name ' Remember the current VSD name so it can be ignored.

    ' Set the default pathname
    PathName = CurDir & "\"
    PathFileName = PathName & "*.vsd"

    ' Find the first file from the directory (not necessarily the first alphabetically)
    CurFileName = Dir(PathFileName)

    Do While CurFileName <> ""

    If CurFileName <> currentDoc Then ' ignore the current document

    ' Open the file
    PathFileName = PathName & CurFileName
    Set docObj = Documents.Open(PathFileName)

    ' iterate through the collection of pages
    For Each PagObj In docObj.Pages
    ' ------- Do the magic
     PagObj.AutoSize = False
    ' ------- Do the magic

    next PagObj

    docObj.Close

     End If ' Finished ignoring the current document

    CurFileName = Dir ' Find the next Visio drawing

    Loop

    End Sub


    John... the original Visio MVP (since 1993) Visio.MVPs.org
    Monday, January 3, 2011 11:55 PM
  • Of course, remember rule one before trying something like this.

    Rule 1: Backup, Backup, Backup...


    John... the original Visio MVP (since 1993) Visio.MVPs.org
    Monday, January 3, 2011 11:56 PM
  • OMG MS development engineers are fricken retarded!!!  How could they come up with such a moronic implementation of what should be a handy feature for some?? Unreal, get a clue MS... :(
    ----------------------------------------------------- Regards, Shane Stevenson.
    Tuesday, April 19, 2011 1:58 AM
  • Another tack: Add the Auto Size check box to the Quick Access Toolbar, so it's super-easy to turn off.

    1. Right-click on the Ribbon and choose “Customize Quick Access Toolbar”.
    2. Choose “All Commands” in the top-left drop-down.
    3. Find “Page Auto Size” in the list, and Add >> it to the list on the right, then click OK.
    4. The Page Auto Size toggle button appears amongst the other icons atop your Visio window. It is now a snap to disable AutoConnect.

    You'll still have to do it on a per-drawing basis, but now you don't have to horse with switching Ribbon tabs.


    Chris Roth Visio Guy (http://www.visguy.com) Please check Mark as Answered if I've answered your question and solved your problem. If you found my post helpful, please click Vote as Helpful.
    Tuesday, April 19, 2011 12:37 PM
  • I agree with NeotekGuru. The way MS has changed the user interface of the Office products, and in particular Visio, is terrible. It is analogous to having driven a car for 20 years (about how long the user interfaces have been around), and then suddenly finding that the only car available has its gas pedal in on the passenger side, the shift is now where the radio volume control used to be and the emergency brake is in the trunk. A good example of the change in UI in Visio is control-W, which used to zoom to display the entire page (very useful), but now changes windows.

    Yes, we all can learn to use a new UI, but it takes time, which cuts into productivity. Even after learning the new UI, I believe it is slower and more cumbersome to use. I feel like I have been to Sam the genius tailor.

    A fellow went to Sam to be measured for a custom suit. When the fellow returned to pick up the suit, he found it fit very badly. The sleeves were not attached to the jacket body symmetrically. The back was baggy. One pant leg was longer than the other. The fellow said, "I can't wear this!"

    Sam replied, "Well, just twist your body a little, so your arms are in line with the sleeves. Bend over, to take up the extra fabric in the back. And take bigger steps with your right leg than your left leg." The fellow left the shop, following Sam's recommendations.

    A block away, another guy stopped the fellow and complemented his tailor. "He must be a genius to be able to fit a cripple like you!"

    Tuesday, November 8, 2011 4:07 PM
  •  

    I agree with NeotekGuru. The way MS has changed the user interface of the Office products, and in particular Visio, is terrible. It is analogous to having driven a car for 20 years (about how long the user interfaces have been around), and then suddenly finding that the only car available has its gas pedal in on the passenger side, the shift is now where the radio volume control used to be and the emergency brake is in the trunk. A good example of the change in UI in Visio is control-W, which used to zoom to display the entire page (very useful), but now changes windows.

     

    Yes, we all can learn to use a new UI, but it takes time, which cuts into productivity. Even after learning the new UI, I believe it is slower and more cumbersome to use. I feel like I have been to Sam the genius tailor.

    A fellow went to Sam to be measured for a custom suit. When the fellow returned to pick up the suit, he found it fit very badly. The sleeves were not attached to the jacket body symmetrically. The back was baggy. One pant leg was longer than the other. The fellow said, "I can't wear this!"

    Sam replied, "Well, just twist your body a little, so your arms are in line with the sleeves. Bend over, to take up the extra fabric in the back. And take bigger steps with your right leg than your left leg." The fellow left the shop, following Sam's recommendations.

    A block away, another guy stopped the fellow and complemented his tailor. "He must be a genius to be able to fit a cripple like you!"

    There was a wonderful story years ago (Alan Coren, Punch magazine) about how King Richard III went to get a suit of armour made, and ended up a hunchback.

     

     


    -- Paul Herber, Sandrila Ltd. http://www.sandrila.co.uk/ Engineering and software shapes for Visio.
    Tuesday, November 8, 2011 4:20 PM