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Do I need Enterprise Voice?

    Question

  • Hello, I'm planning our first Lync deployment and am not sure if we need Enterprise Voice. We currently have a VoIP solution with Cisco Call Manager and all users have Cisco IP Phones.

    We do not need Lync to replace our VoIP solution, but I'm not sure what Lync components are needed to ensure we have as much integration between Lync and Call Manager.

    Do I only need the Enterprise Voice components if I were going to replace our VoIP solution, or do I still need it to allow the integration between both platforms?

    Thursday, August 11, 2011 6:39 PM

Answers

All replies

  • The integration with Cisco Call Manager is via a Cisco product call Cisco Unified Communication Integration with Lync (or generally known as CUCILYNC). It is documented on the Cisco site here. Just to say it gives a certain level of integration but effectively uses Cisco for all voice and video capability. Therefore to implement it in a fully Cisco supported way requires disabling functionality in Lync and implementing meeting place alongside Call Manager. I would suggest a thorough reading of the documentation and review of the combined functionality before you venture too far down this road.

    Mike


    If a post is helpful, please take a second to hit the green arrow on the left, or mark as answer, thanks

    MCITP: Lync, Exchange 2010 & Server Administrator

    Designing Lync Blog

    View Michael Brophy's profile on LinkedIn

    Thursday, August 11, 2011 9:14 PM
  • Thanks Mike. I would not want to use Cisco for the video capability. We've just upgaded to Exchange 2010 with UM, and we're mainly looking for the IM and conferencing features out of Lync, including dial-in. I guess I just don't understand yet where the hand-off is when you're using a 3rd party VoIP.

    Friday, August 12, 2011 2:05 PM
  • We too have a large (4000+) call manager implementation, however we also deployed lync with enterprise voice and connected it to the call manager via a sip trunk to allow people to also use lync to make/recieve calls.  This allows us to use lync for audio/video conferencing, dial-in conferencing, and for people to have their "desk phone" at home when working via vpn since we use the same extension in both lync and call manager.  So far the users love it, and it was easy to tie to call manager for pbx integration
    Friday, August 12, 2011 5:21 PM
  • Pantherfan

    So you have a full Cisco PBX, licenced for 4000 users and a Lync UC solution, licenced for 4000 users, including the Plus CAL with management of two systems with overlapping functionality and different management interfaces. As an architect working for a Cisco and MS partner, I could never see myself proposing such a solution but if it works for your company, that's great.


    Mike


    If a post is helpful, please take a second to hit the green arrow on the left, or mark as answer, thanks

    MCITP: Lync, Exchange 2010 & Server Administrator

    Designing Lync Blog

    View Michael Brophy's profile on LinkedIn

    Friday, August 12, 2011 7:29 PM
  • sometimes i hate posting on boards due to some folks need to be condescending.  I said we had 4000+ cisco callmanager users, not everyone is lync enterprise voice enabled.  I am glad i work for a company that provides the kind of flexibility to try different solutions.  We are also moving to exchange unified messaging from Cisco Unity, and with lync's enhanced voicemail functionality for it, I am sure even more people will look at switching from cisco to MS.  At this point in time Lync is seen as an "additive" service, not as a PBX replacement, but if more people seem to prefer it over call-manager we would then look at rolling out SBA's and a more PBX like infrastructure for it. We do not see the systems as having "overlapping fucntionality", we use callmanager for office phones only, not conferencing, remote softphones, etc.

     

    Monday, August 15, 2011 12:57 PM
  • Apologies if I appear condescending, it was unintentional.

    Mike


    If a post is helpful, please take a second to hit the green arrow on the left, or mark as answer, thanks

    MCITP: Lync, Exchange 2010 & Server Administrator

    Designing Lync Blog

    View Michael Brophy's profile on LinkedIn

    Monday, August 15, 2011 1:44 PM
  • Panther, thanks for the response, that is what I'm looking to do as well. I actually found the perfect document for it :

    http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=26800

    Integrating Microsoft Lync Server 2010 and Cisco Unified Communications Manager

     

    Unfortunately our telephony side has always been seperate from our Microsoft side. This will be my first attempt to start bridging the gap.

     

    Monday, August 15, 2011 2:13 PM
  • No problem, it sounds like you were wanting to get the same thing out of it that we did, which is to use Lync for presence, im, conferencing, etc, while keeping your cisco phones in place as well. The sip trunk piece works well, the only thing your going to miss is true dual forking since cisco isnt supporting that, so you wont get presence updates in lync when someone answers their cisco phone, or vice versa.  It isnt that much of an issue for us, since the vast majority of our users just use cisco phones, only our mobile workforce really use lync, and quite a few of those are offering to give up their cisco phones altogether lol.  Good luck with the rollout, so far Lync has been one of the most positive rollouts i have ever seen, even getting thank you emails from international sales folks hehe.
    Monday, August 15, 2011 2:17 PM
  • Hi Tim

     

    Did you get a verdict whether you needed the Plus license as I am just starting the same project.

     

    Thanks

    Wednesday, August 17, 2011 10:41 AM
  • Hi Tim

     

    Did you get a verdict whether you needed the Plus license as I am just starting the same project.

     

    Thanks


    I believe to be able to place and receive voice calls via Lync, the Plus CAL is needed. That is to say, if you're using a device that's configured with Lync, and needs to call out of the Lync environment to the PSTN.
    Friday, August 19, 2011 2:54 PM
  • hi Panther,

    can you elaborate more on how you / your organization "use the same extension in both lync and call manager"? 'cuz several other threads on this forum briefly mentioned s'thing along the line of Cisco using extension 11111 and the corresponding lync client being #11111 (with the hash?!). is that also what you did? or you actually have both Cisco and Lync extensions between identical, i.e. just 11111? do you specify a "tel:" on the lync side? ya know, with the E164 version of the Cisco DID?

    So glad to see your post, as what you're doing is exactly what we'd like to do. Thanks a ton in advance!

    -Chuck

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 6:13 PM
  • we actually use the exact same extension on both systems, using a feature in call manager called Single number reach to essentially send the call request down the sip trunk to lync, in addition to ringing the cisco phone.

    in our lync telephone URI, we have it like tel:+xxxyyyy;ext=yyyy

    For the users who decided to use lync exclusively, we have a route pattern in call manager that just sends the request directly to the lync sip trunk. We do this since all inbound calls come in via the cisco PBX currently.

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 6:46 PM