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Command-prompt to check installed Windows Updates RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is there a simple command that can be used to check the installed Windows Updates from the Command-prompt?

    e.g. to check if MS10-066 is installed on the server from the Windows Command-prompt

    Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:13 PM

Answers

  • You'll need the corresponding KB number (982802) or you'll need to know if it was part of a rollup or service pack.

    wmic qfe list

    -- Mike Burr
    • Marked as answer by Dave_H_H Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:42 PM
    Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:25 PM

All replies

  • You'll need the corresponding KB number (982802) or you'll need to know if it was part of a rollup or service pack.

    wmic qfe list

    -- Mike Burr
    • Marked as answer by Dave_H_H Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:42 PM
    Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:25 PM
  • Thanks Mike!

    This worked for me:

    wmic qfe | find “982802”

    • Proposed as answer by Sudo Nathan Tuesday, June 19, 2012 1:24 PM
    Tuesday, October 5, 2010 8:42 PM
  • You can use on Command-prompt "systeminfo > c:\updates.txt" and on file generated you search the KB´s.
    • Proposed as answer by Alaaeldin_EID Monday, August 1, 2016 6:55 AM
    Thursday, August 27, 2015 6:30 PM
  • Thanks, worked as advertised.
    Friday, November 13, 2015 3:59 PM
  • Worked great just what i needed to collect updates manually.
    Wednesday, July 20, 2016 1:36 AM
  • Another option if you want to use PowerShell:

    get-hotfix

    To search for a specific hotfix

    get-hotfix | out-string -stream | select-string   "KB977236"

    • Proposed as answer by IanReynolds Monday, September 10, 2018 2:34 PM
    Sunday, April 2, 2017 8:39 PM
  • I share my solution here, which list every updates ( some post here only list few updates ) and dump to a file

    $Session = New-Object -ComObject "Microsoft.Update.Session"
    $Searcher = $Session.CreateUpdateSearcher()
    $FormatEnumerationLimit=-1
    $historyCount = $Searcher.GetTotalHistoryCount()

    $Searcher.QueryHistory(0, $historyCount) | Select-Object Title, Description, Date,

        @{name="Operation"; expression={switch($_.operation){

            1 {"Installation"}; 2 {"Uninstallation"}; 3 {"Other"}

    }}} -ExpandProperty Title > C:/Maintenance/ListOfWindowsUpdates.txt


    Jeff ANGAMA. Sharepoint Consultant Blog : Jeff Sharepoint Note Blog
    Twitter : Follow me on Twitter

    • Proposed as answer by Nedim Mehic Friday, May 19, 2017 1:24 PM
    Tuesday, May 2, 2017 9:24 AM
  • Jeff,

    Thank you for sharing this script. I'm starting to use saltstack for automated configuration management and their Windows Updates module has been unable to find a specific KB that I was interested in verifying was installed on computers. I've been unable to track down why the module doesn't display this KB (and probably others). The Windows GUI shows it installed, however, but the get-hotfix command does not. Your script DOES show it, though!!!

    KB4012215 is the KB in question.

    Are you able to explain to me what part of your script is exposing this otherwise hidden KB? That might help me in figuring out how to filter it in with saltstack.

    Regards,

    Oliver

    Friday, May 19, 2017 1:14 PM
  • From Windows Powershell run 

    get-hotfix -id KB3002657

    Tuesday, May 23, 2017 10:15 PM