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How to setup Windows server 2012 as DC at home using router RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    I'm trying to setup a domain controller at home and have a few clients added to the domain to test powershell scripts etc. I think I've setup the server correctly as a DC. I've gotten to the point where I get prompted for domain credentials when attempting to add a machine to the domain but it fails. From the research I've done it sounds like a DNS issue. Can I setup this DC as a DNS server as well. How does my home router need to be setup. I've given the DC a static IP in my router. It's confusing because the DC is getting everything it needs from my router so how would the client I want to add the domain get it's IP addresses? I think I need to have all my devices on the network getting internet from the router but these particular PC clients to get their DNS addresses from the DC? I need to have this working without having all my devices on the network getting IP address from the DC. I've got a mix of of kinds of things on my network, PC, Mac, iPhone, XBOX. I'm trying to avoid breaking all that while still getting this DC up to test. Can it be done?

    Thanks

    Joshua


    • Edited by suninmoon Sunday, April 21, 2013 5:57 PM
    Sunday, April 21, 2013 5:55 PM

Answers

  • I have done this multiple times for home use or lab use.

    Yes, Windows includes DNS as part of the OS and it is always a good idea to use the DNS from Windows when you are installing a domain controller.  This integrates DNS right into Active Directory and makes things a lot easier to manage.  Yes, the router also has some of this information, but, the only thing you really need from the router is its routing capability.  Therefore, when you set up your DC, ensure that you have installed Microsoft's DNS when you install the active directory components.  When you give the IP information for the host, use a fixed IP address that is in the same subnet as your router, and use the router as the default gateway.  That's all that should be needed.  Do not point to the router's DNS.  Point the DC to itself (127.0.0.1) for DNS and point all domain members to the DC for DNS.  The domain members will also point to the router as their default gateway.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    • Proposed as answer by Hasan Rahman Wednesday, April 24, 2013 8:03 PM
    • Marked as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Sunday, April 28, 2013 1:09 PM
    Monday, April 22, 2013 12:34 PM
  • The ONLY thing I do to my router is to change the range of DHCP addresses it can hand out.  Then I use the unused portion for fixed IP addresses for things like domain controllers and other servers I want to have a fixed IP address.

    .:|:.:|:. tim

    • Proposed as answer by Hasan Rahman Wednesday, April 24, 2013 8:03 PM
    • Marked as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Sunday, April 28, 2013 1:09 PM
    Wednesday, April 24, 2013 12:27 PM

All replies

  • I have done this multiple times for home use or lab use.

    Yes, Windows includes DNS as part of the OS and it is always a good idea to use the DNS from Windows when you are installing a domain controller.  This integrates DNS right into Active Directory and makes things a lot easier to manage.  Yes, the router also has some of this information, but, the only thing you really need from the router is its routing capability.  Therefore, when you set up your DC, ensure that you have installed Microsoft's DNS when you install the active directory components.  When you give the IP information for the host, use a fixed IP address that is in the same subnet as your router, and use the router as the default gateway.  That's all that should be needed.  Do not point to the router's DNS.  Point the DC to itself (127.0.0.1) for DNS and point all domain members to the DC for DNS.  The domain members will also point to the router as their default gateway.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    • Proposed as answer by Hasan Rahman Wednesday, April 24, 2013 8:03 PM
    • Marked as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Sunday, April 28, 2013 1:09 PM
    Monday, April 22, 2013 12:34 PM
  • Tim

    Thanks for the info, I'll give that a try. So I shouldn't have to disable any functionality on my router?

    Thanks

    Joshua

    Monday, April 22, 2013 1:00 PM
  • The ONLY thing I do to my router is to change the range of DHCP addresses it can hand out.  Then I use the unused portion for fixed IP addresses for things like domain controllers and other servers I want to have a fixed IP address.

    .:|:.:|:. tim

    • Proposed as answer by Hasan Rahman Wednesday, April 24, 2013 8:03 PM
    • Marked as answer by Nick Gu - MSFT Sunday, April 28, 2013 1:09 PM
    Wednesday, April 24, 2013 12:27 PM
  • Yes . Tim is right. I have done this kind of setup before, more than once
    Friday, August 30, 2013 12:28 AM
  • Tim's approach is the right approach
    Friday, August 30, 2013 12:30 AM