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Outlook Anywhere and disabled MAPI RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, is it possible to use only outlook anywhere internally and disable mapi?

    We have 2 TMG servers that might be able to handle the HTTPS traffic instead of putting up a NLB and use MAPI on the CAS servers?
    The clients would choose to connect using HTTP first, then TCP/IP, but then again it would never use TCP/IP since MAPI should be disabled.

    If I enable outlook anywhere with NLTM on CAS now and manually configure a Outlook 2010 client it works great but if I disable MAPI for that user and then try to connect it just stays disconnected.

    If I dont have logged on to outlook before (this is a new deployment in a test phase) and only have outlook anywhere enabled and mapi disabled I cant get the profile to work, assuming that it cant read the OAB?

     

    Wednesday, July 7, 2010 11:21 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Actually, the MAPI connectivity is always used for the Outlook clients even though Outlook Anywhere is enabled.

    As previous buddy said, the Outlook Anywhere is RPC packets encapsulated into HTTPS. Then the RPC/HTTP proxy to do the marshalling and umarshalling the RPC packet, and forwards the packet to the CAS that the clients want to talk to which specify Microsoft Exchange server under Account Settings in Outlook.

    For native MAPI connection, you can just specify the original CAS intead of creating another CAS array.

    Thanks

    Allen

    • Marked as answer by Allen Song Friday, July 16, 2010 9:37 AM
    Monday, July 12, 2010 6:54 AM

All replies

  • Hi ,

    As per my knowledge

    Outlook Anywhere encapsulates MAPI RPC in HTTPS packets.  It used to be
    called RPC-over-HTTPS.

     

    Regards.

    Shafaquat Ali.


    M.C.I.T.P Exchange 2007/2010, M.C.I.T.P Windows Server 2008, M.C.T.S OCS Server 2007 R2
    • Proposed as answer by Shafaquat Ali Wednesday, July 7, 2010 11:48 AM
    Wednesday, July 7, 2010 11:47 AM
  • So this wont work if we disable MAPI on the users mailbox?
    Wednesday, July 7, 2010 1:11 PM
  • Try Set-Mailbox {mailbox} -MAPIEnabled:$false but that might also block OLAnywhere (RPC over HTTPS) since OLAnyhwere is just RPC encapsulated in SSL.

    However, I'm not understanding what this would buy you from a HA standpoint. If you would configure 2 TMG servers, they would individually balance the internal CAS servers if you set them up using a Farm config. But you'll still need to configure an NLB between the 2 TMG servers to provide HA.

    So, I think you've overcomplicated things.

    BTW, you can use the "Set-OutlookProvider EXPR -OutlookProviderFlags ServerExclusiveConnect" to make OL2010 connect to the OLAnywhere endpoint faster.

    The OutlookProviderFlags parameter specifies that Outlook 2010 clients should connect using RPC over HTTP (Outlook Anywhere) before trying RPC over TCP connections. This increases the speed at which Outlook 2010 clients will connect when clients are primarily accessing Exchange over the Internet. The value can be set to ServerExclusiveConnect or to None to clear the flags. For Outlook 2010 clients that access Exchange over both organization intranets and the Internet, the recommended value is None, which is also the default setting.

     

     


    Mark E. Smith
    Practice Manager, Unified Communications
    Capax Global Consulting
    My Blog - http://blogs.capaxglobal.com/markesmith
    Wednesday, July 7, 2010 2:51 PM
  • Hi Mark,

    The thing is that we want to minimize the diffrent ways the clients are conencting to Exchange.

    We will have two TMG with Edge/Forefront for OWA users and if we can have Outlook clients go that road aswell we wont be needing another NLB/CAS Array on the CAS servers.

    Don't know of the cons, but the only thing is that we have all the clients regardless of the protocol, going trough TMG!

    Thursday, July 8, 2010 7:29 AM
  • Hi,

    Actually, the MAPI connectivity is always used for the Outlook clients even though Outlook Anywhere is enabled.

    As previous buddy said, the Outlook Anywhere is RPC packets encapsulated into HTTPS. Then the RPC/HTTP proxy to do the marshalling and umarshalling the RPC packet, and forwards the packet to the CAS that the clients want to talk to which specify Microsoft Exchange server under Account Settings in Outlook.

    For native MAPI connection, you can just specify the original CAS intead of creating another CAS array.

    Thanks

    Allen

    • Marked as answer by Allen Song Friday, July 16, 2010 9:37 AM
    Monday, July 12, 2010 6:54 AM