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Difference between office 365 and windows azure RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,


    I am working on SharePoint 2010,i want to know the difference between the office 365 and windows azure.What is the use,Advantages and disadvantages with some explanation. 

    Thanks in Advance.

    phani kumar 

    Monday, November 18, 2013 7:30 AM

Answers

  • O365 and Windows azure are cloud based services.
    In Cloud, three types of services are available
    1) SaaS  : Software as a Service
    2) IaaS  : Infrastructure as a Service
    3) PaaS  : Platform as a Service
    Office 365(O365)is SaaS,which provides an online version of Office suites(office web apps)along with Share Point, Lync and Exchange no matter what their size is, and no matter what their needs are.
    the Components of the Office Suite Includes: Outlook, PowerPoint, Word, Excel,Lync,One Note,Access.
    Windows Azure is IaaS and PaaS.
    With IaaS model ,Windows Azure is Microsoft's Operating System for Cloud Computing which mainly consist of three components:compute, storage, and virtual network.

    With PaaS model,Microsoft Windows Azure can be used as a development, service hosting and service management environment.

    Tuesday, November 19, 2013 7:47 AM

All replies

  • windowz azure is the name the way microsoft provide cloud services, office 365 is a package which is again in the cloud which includes SharePoint in the cloud and several other softwares

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    Monday, November 18, 2013 8:27 AM
  • Thanks for you answer...

    Can you please explain more,with difference between office 365 and windows azure.

    When we will use office 365 and windows azure?

    what are the advantages and disadvantages of office 365 and windows azure?

    Thanks in Advance.

    phani kumar raavi

    Monday, November 18, 2013 9:12 AM
  • I hope this link helps :- http://www.codemag.com/Article/1108021

    Prajwal Desai, http://prajwaldesai.com

    Monday, November 18, 2013 9:34 AM
  • O365 and Windows azure are cloud based services.
    In Cloud, three types of services are available
    1) SaaS  : Software as a Service
    2) IaaS  : Infrastructure as a Service
    3) PaaS  : Platform as a Service
    Office 365(O365)is SaaS,which provides an online version of Office suites(office web apps)along with Share Point, Lync and Exchange no matter what their size is, and no matter what their needs are.
    the Components of the Office Suite Includes: Outlook, PowerPoint, Word, Excel,Lync,One Note,Access.
    Windows Azure is IaaS and PaaS.
    With IaaS model ,Windows Azure is Microsoft's Operating System for Cloud Computing which mainly consist of three components:compute, storage, and virtual network.

    With PaaS model,Microsoft Windows Azure can be used as a development, service hosting and service management environment.

    Tuesday, November 19, 2013 7:47 AM
  • thanks  
    Monday, July 25, 2016 6:41 AM
  • I love the technical answers....not.

    Seriously the "differences" mentioned are important if your are looking for using the Azure Product.

    I think there are VAST differences when it comes to determining your needs vs. the tools and services you get with each.

    I for one, after some limited research do not think Azure is necessary for an Office that only needs Office Tools. 

    But...

    What about Enterprise Antivirus...do I need An azure Server to run that or should I just keep it internal on a low cost server?

    What about other applications that are provided by Vendors...now I just let them log in using Gotoassist, Teamviewer etc...

    What happens when the product is on an Azure Server...my current short list of vendors do not have a clue or are actively moving their applications to the Cloud already...

    So the real question is do I need Azure...and Why?  For me the answer is No.

    Unless someone can convince that there is some service or tool that I can use that would compel me to sign on.

    Friday, April 21, 2017 12:46 PM