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Requested registry access is not allowed. RRS feed

Answers

  • Troubleshooting Using the Last Known Good Configuration

    Step 1

    Turn the computer on and press the F8 after the computer manufacturer's screen appears but before the Windows screen appears.

    Step 2

    Select Use the Last Known Good Configuration, using the arrow keys.

    Step 3

    Hit the Enter button to begin the rebooting process. Windows XP will reboot the computer using the configuration that last worked before the registry became corrupt.

    Step 4

    Proceed to either Section 2, Troubleshooting Using System Restore, or Section 3, Troubleshooting Using Driver Rollback, to complete the troubleshooting process.
    Troubleshooting Using System Restore

    Step 1

    Click the Start menu and open All Programs once the computer has completed the reboot process.

    Step 2

    Click Accessories > System Tools > System Restore.

    Step 3

    Choose Restore My Computer from the option menus and pick a date when the computer was functioning normally.

    Step 4

    Click Next to begin the system restoration. This process will erase all changes made to the directory after the restore point. Hopefully this will correct the corrupt registry file, and the computer will begin to function properly. System Restore takes a few minutes. Do not turn off the computer during the process or the registry may become even more damaged. System Restore will automatically restart the computer once the process is completed.
    Troubleshooting Using Driver Rollback

    Step 1

    Click the Start button and open the Control Panel.

    Step 2

    Click Performance & Maintenance > System.

    Step 3

    Click the Hardware tab and choose Device Manager.

    Step 4

    Scroll through the list of drivers looking for the one that has a yellow warning sign or red X that designates it as a corrupt driver.

    Step 5

    Right-click on the corrupt driver and choose Properties.

    Step 6

    Click the Driver tab and choose Roll Back Driver. Click OK.

    Step 7

    Restart the computer.


    • Edited by Mike Walsh FIN Thursday, December 2, 2010 6:42 AM Link to third-party program removed. No need for this given the details in the post
    • Marked as answer by Mike Walsh FIN Monday, December 20, 2010 9:31 PM
    Monday, November 29, 2010 4:38 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

     

    I experienced exactly the same issue. I solved it by adding my application pool user to the administrators group on Active Directory level. It fixed my problem, but I am not too happy with it.

     

    Cause of this error is that the application pool has not enough rights to create a (sub)key in the event logger utility.

     

    First of all, I decided to create a separate active directory user to be my application pool user for my web application, as it is suggested in the manuals of SharePoint. This to follow the principle of least priviliges. However, by adding my application user back to the administrators group, I break again this principle.

     

    Secondly, I don't find it logic I should manually add permissions for my application pool user. I would suppose that SharePoint was able to grant the appropriate rights to the application pool user automatically...

     

    Is there somebody who knows which rights (limited) I should assign exactly to such an application pool user in order to make SharePoint run as it should? Because my option to add the application pool user to the administrator group was just a desperate solution after trying to give several rights seperately to the application pool user, but not finding the exact needed rights.

    Thursday, July 5, 2007 8:24 AM
  • Troubleshooting Using the Last Known Good Configuration

    Step 1

    Turn the computer on and press the F8 after the computer manufacturer's screen appears but before the Windows screen appears.

    Step 2

    Select Use the Last Known Good Configuration, using the arrow keys.

    Step 3

    Hit the Enter button to begin the rebooting process. Windows XP will reboot the computer using the configuration that last worked before the registry became corrupt.

    Step 4

    Proceed to either Section 2, Troubleshooting Using System Restore, or Section 3, Troubleshooting Using Driver Rollback, to complete the troubleshooting process.
    Troubleshooting Using System Restore

    Step 1

    Click the Start menu and open All Programs once the computer has completed the reboot process.

    Step 2

    Click Accessories > System Tools > System Restore.

    Step 3

    Choose Restore My Computer from the option menus and pick a date when the computer was functioning normally.

    Step 4

    Click Next to begin the system restoration. This process will erase all changes made to the directory after the restore point. Hopefully this will correct the corrupt registry file, and the computer will begin to function properly. System Restore takes a few minutes. Do not turn off the computer during the process or the registry may become even more damaged. System Restore will automatically restart the computer once the process is completed.
    Troubleshooting Using Driver Rollback

    Step 1

    Click the Start button and open the Control Panel.

    Step 2

    Click Performance & Maintenance > System.

    Step 3

    Click the Hardware tab and choose Device Manager.

    Step 4

    Scroll through the list of drivers looking for the one that has a yellow warning sign or red X that designates it as a corrupt driver.

    Step 5

    Right-click on the corrupt driver and choose Properties.

    Step 6

    Click the Driver tab and choose Roll Back Driver. Click OK.

    Step 7

    Restart the computer.


    • Edited by Mike Walsh FIN Thursday, December 2, 2010 6:42 AM Link to third-party program removed. No need for this given the details in the post
    • Marked as answer by Mike Walsh FIN Monday, December 20, 2010 9:31 PM
    Monday, November 29, 2010 4:38 AM