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Powershell ISE vs. PowerGUI RRS feed

  • Question

  • Can anyone comment on the relative strengths/weaknesses of Powershell ISE vs. PowerGUI (from Dell/Quest).  I've only worked with these for a short time. The most obvious strength of the ISE is that it's already installed.  Otherwise, are they equivalent?  Does PowerGUI have more add-ons since it's been around longer?
    Friday, August 2, 2013 10:02 PM

Answers

  • The distinctions depend on your focus. Jeff and Yan Li have pointed out some specific advantages, so here's some other information that may provide context.

    PowerShell ISE is just _different_ - not quite comparable to PowerGUI. It's not a full-fledged text editor, but it is intended to be an out-of-box non-console tool that serves as a PowerShell script editor. You can _think_ of it as a tool with features that complement PS interactive use and could be economically implemented. (ISE as an idea started out as a simple proof of concept, although it's gone beyond that now).As you observe, a primary advantage is that ISE is there - it's there and a heck of a lot better than Notepad. :|

    However, it's not and was never intended to be a real scripting IDE. Two things that are important that PowerGUI (and other tools) can provide are a good text editing environment, and at least an interface for version control. 


    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 4:54 AM
  • In my opinion, the ISE works perfectly well for everything I've ever needed to do (and I use it without any of the extensions that are floating around). The only reason I'd go through the extra steps of downloading and installing PowerGUI was if I needed to use the compile a script to .exe functionality.

    Don't retire TechNet!

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 2:28 PM
  • Hi,

    In addition, there are commands that used to manage AD build by PowershellGUI, such as get-qadgroup, get-qadgroupmember and so on.

    Please also read below article:

    http://www.quest.com/powergui-freeware/

    Please Note: Since the web site is not hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    Regards,

    Yan Li

    If you have any feedback on our support, please click here .


    Cataleya Li
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 3:32 AM
  • I guess my only concern with PowerGUI is that I'm not sure if Quest is going to keep it around.  I use the ISE myself but I like Idera's PowerShell Plus and I'm going to try out Sapien's PowerSehll Studio in the near future.

    I've just not had a need for anything more than the ISE and since Quest got bought out I've worried about their staying power in the community.


    Hope that helps! Jason

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 2:44 PM
  • I use neither: the ISE is obviously very limited and PowerGUI's in-built cmdlets are from my point of view annoying because they will not work if I pass the script to someone who does not work with PowerGUI. If you want an IDE that is free, PowerGUI will be the better one however. If you have some budget, go for Sapiens PowerShell Studio. It's not perfect, but it offers some stuff that other IDEs can't do (e.g. Visual Studio-like GUI creation).

    My grandmother always used to say: "::1: sweet ::1:"

    Another free option, and one I am currently using, is PrimalPad, also from Sapien. I previously used PrimalScript from Sapien, but got tired of the frequent version upgrades, even with fairly good upgrade pricing. A few other reasons for that switch were:

    1. I was not using a lot of the extensive functionality of PrimalScript
    2. PrimalPad can be run from a USB drive or network share with no installation footprint.

    It has limited debugging capability, and no built-in console-like pane as does ISE, but so far this has suited me. On the positive side, it does have a built-in Print function, unlike ISE. You can, of course, add printing capability to ISE, but that means having to configure it that way on any machine you might happen to want to use.


    Al Dunbar -- remember to 'mark or propose as answer' or 'vote as helpful' as appropriate.

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Thursday, August 8, 2013 3:20 PM

All replies

  • The Quest addon packs are worth the PowerGUI download.  Also, the capability to search through the script library so you're not duplicating work that has already been done is incredibly useful.
    Saturday, August 3, 2013 6:09 AM
  • Hi,

    In addition, there are commands that used to manage AD build by PowershellGUI, such as get-qadgroup, get-qadgroupmember and so on.

    Please also read below article:

    http://www.quest.com/powergui-freeware/

    Please Note: Since the web site is not hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    Regards,

    Yan Li

    If you have any feedback on our support, please click here .


    Cataleya Li
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 3:32 AM
  • The distinctions depend on your focus. Jeff and Yan Li have pointed out some specific advantages, so here's some other information that may provide context.

    PowerShell ISE is just _different_ - not quite comparable to PowerGUI. It's not a full-fledged text editor, but it is intended to be an out-of-box non-console tool that serves as a PowerShell script editor. You can _think_ of it as a tool with features that complement PS interactive use and could be economically implemented. (ISE as an idea started out as a simple proof of concept, although it's gone beyond that now).As you observe, a primary advantage is that ISE is there - it's there and a heck of a lot better than Notepad. :|

    However, it's not and was never intended to be a real scripting IDE. Two things that are important that PowerGUI (and other tools) can provide are a good text editing environment, and at least an interface for version control. 


    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 4:54 AM
  • In my opinion, the ISE works perfectly well for everything I've ever needed to do (and I use it without any of the extensions that are floating around). The only reason I'd go through the extra steps of downloading and installing PowerGUI was if I needed to use the compile a script to .exe functionality.

    Don't retire TechNet!

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 2:28 PM
  • I guess my only concern with PowerGUI is that I'm not sure if Quest is going to keep it around.  I use the ISE myself but I like Idera's PowerShell Plus and I'm going to try out Sapien's PowerSehll Studio in the near future.

    I've just not had a need for anything more than the ISE and since Quest got bought out I've worried about their staying power in the community.


    Hope that helps! Jason

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 2:44 PM
  • I use neither: the ISE is obviously very limited and PowerGUI's in-built cmdlets are from my point of view annoying because they will not work if I pass the script to someone who does not work with PowerGUI. If you want an IDE that is free, PowerGUI will be the better one however. If you have some budget, go for Sapiens PowerShell Studio. It's not perfect, but it offers some stuff that other IDEs can't do (e.g. Visual Studio-like GUI creation).

    My grandmother always used to say: "::1: sweet ::1:"

    Tuesday, August 6, 2013 4:05 PM
  • If it is strictly between PowerGUI and ISE, I go for PowerGUI because of the much richer intellisense and other text editing benefits such as multi-line commenting and line grouping (using #region).

    The auto snapin/module importing in PowerGUI can create portability issue though.  Therefore I always turn it off.
    Wednesday, August 7, 2013 5:14 AM
  • Hi 

    We have not heard from you in a couple of days.

    Please post back at your convenience if we can assist further.

     

    Enjoy your day!

    Regards,

    Yan Li

    If you have any feedback on our support, please click here .


    Cataleya Li
    TechNet Community Support

    Thursday, August 8, 2013 2:54 AM
  • I use neither: the ISE is obviously very limited and PowerGUI's in-built cmdlets are from my point of view annoying because they will not work if I pass the script to someone who does not work with PowerGUI. If you want an IDE that is free, PowerGUI will be the better one however. If you have some budget, go for Sapiens PowerShell Studio. It's not perfect, but it offers some stuff that other IDEs can't do (e.g. Visual Studio-like GUI creation).

    My grandmother always used to say: "::1: sweet ::1:"

    Another free option, and one I am currently using, is PrimalPad, also from Sapien. I previously used PrimalScript from Sapien, but got tired of the frequent version upgrades, even with fairly good upgrade pricing. A few other reasons for that switch were:

    1. I was not using a lot of the extensive functionality of PrimalScript
    2. PrimalPad can be run from a USB drive or network share with no installation footprint.

    It has limited debugging capability, and no built-in console-like pane as does ISE, but so far this has suited me. On the positive side, it does have a built-in Print function, unlike ISE. You can, of course, add printing capability to ISE, but that means having to configure it that way on any machine you might happen to want to use.


    Al Dunbar -- remember to 'mark or propose as answer' or 'vote as helpful' as appropriate.

    • Marked as answer by Yan Li_ Monday, August 12, 2013 12:34 PM
    Thursday, August 8, 2013 3:20 PM
  • Hello

    I did not found any information about PowerGui on www.quest.com/powergui-freeware/? Is it still available?

    Avian

    Thursday, November 17, 2016 9:17 AM
  • Did you try to google it?  PowerGUI is now owned by Dell for a while. But as far as I know they are not developing it anymore. If you're looking for a free IDE you could try Visual Studio Code with the Powershell Plugin.

    Grüße - Best regards

    PS:> (79,108,97,102|%{[char]$_})-join''

    Thursday, November 17, 2016 9:25 AM