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GB to GiB conversion? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi. When a customer asks me that they need a 200 GB Standard_V2 disk, do I type in 200 or do I need to convert it from 200 GBs to 200 GiBs? If I do, is there a formula? I suppose this also applies to File Quotas. Everything in Azure Storage is in GiB but most customers ask for sizes in GB. Thanks!
    Thursday, September 5, 2019 10:12 PM

Answers

  • @jsonnnnnnnniiuy8In general, don’t need to be concerned about this because Windows and Azure always measure in GiB (or KiB, MiB, TiB, etc.) even though they label in the base-10 units has informed by @Will Gries Windows and Azure are actually using the same units, but Windows is labeling them incorrectly. This is historical, and therefore very difficult to change. GiB and GB are both SI units, and since we're billing you for storage, we want to use the correct units.
    Hope this helps! 

    Kindly let us know if the above helps or you need further assistance on this issue.

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    Do click on "Mark as Answer" and Upvote on the post that helps you, this can be beneficial to other community members.

    Monday, September 9, 2019 2:13 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    The size unit for disks in Azure is measured in Gibibyte (GiB) just like you said, so when you configure a new/existing disk it will always be in GiB, so there's no need for any conversion.

    I think it's just the terminology, many people don't know about "GiB", so they use/talk about the old known Gigabyte (GB), it is also easier to calculate in GB.

    1GB = 1024 MB

    1GiB = 1073.74 MB

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Thursday, September 5, 2019 10:55 PM
  • Hi,

    In my understandings, if GB and GiB is used in the same context,
       1 GB = 1,000 MB
       1 GiB = 1,024 MB

    And, confusingly, 1 GB means 1,024 MB in many cases (also in Windows). 

    Regards,

    Ashidacchi -- https://ssl01.rocketnet.jp/hokusosha.com/default.html

    Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:20 PM
  • When calculating in decimal 1GB is 1000MB yes, 1024MB is in binary, people often (99% of the time) tend to calculate in decimal ;-)


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:


    • Edited by Leon Laude Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:24 PM
    Thursday, September 5, 2019 11:24 PM
  • Thanks for all the responses, folks!

    So in other words, if the customer is requesting 200 GB, I provision 200 GiB?

    Still scratching my head a little bit on this one. : )

    Friday, September 6, 2019 1:45 AM
  • Hi,

    If you (or your customer) use Windows, please provision 200 GB (or 204,800 MB).

    Regards,

    Ashidacchi -- https://ssl01.rocketnet.jp/hokusosha.com/default.html

    Friday, September 6, 2019 2:02 AM
  • Better to provision what the customer(s) expect, if it’s ”200GB” they want, then make sure that’s what they get.

    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Friday, September 6, 2019 6:39 AM
  • Yep! Which reminds me, I need to remind them that 200 GB/GiB is unformatted, so their useable space is going to be less than 200 GB/GiB. Unless I enable compression, then ymmv. So many caveats! : ) Thanks again, everybody!
    Friday, September 6, 2019 1:11 PM
  • You're welcome, that's a very good point to remind the customer about, this way you avoid any "conflicts" about the actual usable disk space later on!

    (Please don't forget to mark helpful replies as answer, this helps the community to recognize useful contributions, thank you!)


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Friday, September 6, 2019 1:16 PM
  • @Ashidacchi diskSizeGB = 1024 provision 1024000000000 bytes of storage

    GiB are larger than GB so a specific number of GB is represented by a smaller number of GiB.

    https://www.gbmb.org/gb-to-gib

    Thanks for the feedback on this –  In Windows and some operating systems use GB (base-10 unit) when they actually are measuring in GiB (base-2 unit). Operating systems began using “GB” with base-2 units before GB was standardized to mean base-10 as part of the Metric system (SI)

    Base-10 units are actually the correct units to use for storage (base-2 are supposed to be used for memory).

    Disclaimer: This response contains a reference to a third party World Wide Web site.
    Microsoft is providing this information as a convenience to you. Microsoft does not control these sites and has not tested any software or information found on these sites; therefore, Microsoft cannot make any representations regarding the quality, safety, or suitability of any software or information found there.

    There are inherent dangers in the use of any software found on the Internet, and Microsoft cautions you to make sure that you completely understand the risk before retrieving any software from the Internet.

    Hope this helps! 

    Kindly let us know if the above helps or you need further assistance on this issue.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Do click on "Mark as Answer" and Upvote on the post that helps you, this can be beneficial to other community members.

    Friday, September 6, 2019 1:22 PM
    Moderator
  • So the formula for conversion, is as follows:

    Convert GB to GiB, where x equals GB:

    x / 1.074

    Example: 200 GB / 1.074 = 186.2 GiB

    Convert GiB to GB, where x equals GiB:

    x * .1.074

    Example: 186.2 GiB * 1.074 = 200 GB

    I noticed in Azure today that it automatically will round-up any decimal, so in the first example, when I typed in 186.2 GiB, it automatically updated it to 187 GiB.




    Friday, September 6, 2019 3:11 PM
  • Hi jsonnnnnnnniiuy8,

    Sumanth's description is right. Windows and Azure are actually using the same units, but Windows is labeling them incorrectly. This is historical, and therefore very difficult to change. GiB and GB are both SI units, and since we're billing you for storage, we want to use the correct units.

    You're not getting short-changed here. If you attach a 4 TiB disk to a VM, Windows will report 4 TB.

    Note: there are still places in our documentation and UI that use GB instead of GiB. We're trying to fix these as they come up, but they come up frequently because people are so used to using the wrong units.

    Thanks,

    Will Gries
    Program Manager, Azure Storage

    Saturday, September 7, 2019 6:55 AM
  • Yes, thanks. After several tests in Azure, a GiB in Azure is the same value in GB reflected by the operating system. So if you do have a specific size requirement in GB, there's no need to convert it in Azure to GiB. However, if your storage requirements have a specific size in GiB, you will need to convert them from GiB to GB.

    Here's a screenscrape in Azure reflecting a 32GiB LUN created for a Windows Server 2019 VM.

    And here's how it looks in GBs on the Windows Server 2019 VM in Disk Management:

    Sunday, September 8, 2019 5:27 PM
  • @jsonnnnnnnniiuy8In general, don’t need to be concerned about this because Windows and Azure always measure in GiB (or KiB, MiB, TiB, etc.) even though they label in the base-10 units has informed by @Will Gries Windows and Azure are actually using the same units, but Windows is labeling them incorrectly. This is historical, and therefore very difficult to change. GiB and GB are both SI units, and since we're billing you for storage, we want to use the correct units.
    Hope this helps! 

    Kindly let us know if the above helps or you need further assistance on this issue.

    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Do click on "Mark as Answer" and Upvote on the post that helps you, this can be beneficial to other community members.

    Monday, September 9, 2019 2:13 PM
    Moderator
  • This does help. Thank you.

    I just need to let customers know that a MB/GB/TB/PB, etc. in Microsoft Windows is actually a MiB/GiB/TiB/PiB, etc.

    Thanks again for all the input, folks!

    Monday, September 9, 2019 9:15 PM