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What version of DPM to use in a mixed environment RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi

    We currently use DPM 2012 R2 in our environment on 2 x servers both running Windows 2012 R2.  We need to upgrade the DPM version due to an SCCM upgrade, and I was planning to move to DPM 2016 on a Windows 2016  server.

    I have now been discussing this with another colleague who is planning to roll out some Windows 2019 servers, so I have looked at upgrading to DPM 2019 on a Windows 2019 platform instead as we will need to protect these new 2019 servers as well (having looked at the DPM support matrix, I don't believe DPM 2016 can back up Windows 2019).

    This presents a few problems as from looking at the support matrix for DPM 2019, I don't think it can back up some of the older Microsoft technologies, so I thought I would double check with the community to see if there is a way around this or will I have to have two different versions of DPM running side by side?

    The clients I want to back up are as follows:

    Windows 2008 R2 (HyperV guests and physical servers)
    Windows 2012 R2 (HyperV guests and physical servers)
    Windows 2016 (HyperV guests and physical servers)
    Windows 2019 (HyperV guests and physical servers)
    SharePoint 2013
    SharePoint 2016
    Exchange 2010
    Exchange 2013
    SQL 2012

    Please can someone advise me whether or not I can use a single version of DPM with the correct rollup updates installed or whether (as I am inclined to believe), I need a DPM 2016 server and also a DPM 2019 one?

    Thanks

    Chris. 

    Friday, January 17, 2020 2:47 PM

Answers

  • Hi Chris,

    Since you have a quite wide range of Windows Server operating system versions (2008 R2 - 2019), and also older Exchange/SharePoint versions, to be running a supported DPM scenario as of today you'll need to run two different DPM versions.

    DPM 2016 will likely the version you should use, I'm pretty confident that it will receive support for Windows Server 2019 in an upcoming Update Rollup.

    I have also managed to successfully back up Windows Server 2019 with DPM 2016, although it's not officially supported nor recommended to do "yet", it still works, but better to wait for the support.

    Since you have older Exchange and SharePoint systems, you'll need at least to run DPM 2016, for backing up only Windows Server 2019, you'll need DPM 2019, so for now you'll need these two DPM versions.

    Note: Windows Server 2008 R2 has reached EOL (End-Of-Life) and you should consider upgrading these systems as soon as possible.

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    • Marked as answer by chris624 Monday, January 20, 2020 11:11 AM
    Saturday, January 18, 2020 11:20 AM

All replies

  • Hi Chris,

    Since you have a quite wide range of Windows Server operating system versions (2008 R2 - 2019), and also older Exchange/SharePoint versions, to be running a supported DPM scenario as of today you'll need to run two different DPM versions.

    DPM 2016 will likely the version you should use, I'm pretty confident that it will receive support for Windows Server 2019 in an upcoming Update Rollup.

    I have also managed to successfully back up Windows Server 2019 with DPM 2016, although it's not officially supported nor recommended to do "yet", it still works, but better to wait for the support.

    Since you have older Exchange and SharePoint systems, you'll need at least to run DPM 2016, for backing up only Windows Server 2019, you'll need DPM 2019, so for now you'll need these two DPM versions.

    Note: Windows Server 2008 R2 has reached EOL (End-Of-Life) and you should consider upgrading these systems as soon as possible.

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    • Marked as answer by chris624 Monday, January 20, 2020 11:11 AM
    Saturday, January 18, 2020 11:20 AM
  • Thanks Leon,

    I thought as much.  I did wonder if DPM 2016 would eventually support Windows 2019, however until it is officially supported I don't think I will go down that route.

    We are in the process of decommissioning and upgrading Windows 2008 R2 servers, however this upgrade is planned to go ahead before they have all gone, and we will also have Exchange 2013 and SharePoint 2013 to protect anyway, so it may be the case that we have to go with having the two versions.

    Thanks for your help,

    Chris

    Monday, January 20, 2020 11:11 AM
  • Just to add to my options, I have realised we have one physical and one virtual 2016 server in our environment which are currently being backed up by our DPM 2012 R2 server.  Everything I have read states that Windows 2016 cannot be backed up by DPM 2012 R2, which is not the case here - backups all seem fine and I have done a test restore to an alternate location.

    We are using DPM 2012 R2 RU 14 (4.2.1603.0), and I'm not sure if it is because of this update that allows us to do this (the latest article and DPM 2012 support matrix was published 2 or 3 months before the update release date).

    Have you, Leon, or anyone else had any similar experiences protecting physical or virtual Windows 2016 servers with DPM 2012 R2, or any warnings / concerns / advice about it?

    Wednesday, January 29, 2020 10:43 AM
  • DPM 2012 R2 does not officially support backing up Windows Server 2016, but this doesn't necessarily mean that it won't work, however if you get into any issues you might not get any support from Microsoft.

    I know for a fact that it works too, but as I said, not supported, I would strongly recommend on aiming for a supported configuration.


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Wednesday, January 29, 2020 10:53 AM
  • Thanks Leon.  The aim is definitely to move to DPM 2016 or DPM 2019, but still a few months yet I think.
    Wednesday, January 29, 2020 12:04 PM