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How to know if My product key is a valid key RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have read some threads about people buying Windows 7 product keys on ebay and they are prob no good. I bought 2 product keys for Windows Ultimate 7, but didn't buy them off ebay. But how can I find out if my keys are good keys? After I bought the keys I was given a link to what I think was msdn site to choose my language, and my product That I bought the keys for and I used easymule to download the Windows 7 Ultimate 32 bit iso.

    Before I go through the trouble of formatting my drive and installing Windows Ultimate 7 I was wondering how to tell if these keys are valid and make Windows 7 Ultimate a good copy and get updates. But I dont want to post the keys here if they are good because I paid for them to use and dont want someone to use them before I could activate them.

    Bryant
    Wednesday, March 17, 2010 12:34 AM

Answers

  • If you bought only the keys without Windows 7 media there's a good chance they were illegally sold to you. The only way to know if the keys work is to install Windows 7 and try activating it. Also, be careful when downloading pirated copies of Windows (emule) as many contain viruses, malware, trogans, keyloggers, etc.

    Windows - Is It Genuine
    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine

    Microsoft - Piracy
    http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/default.aspx


    • Marked as answer by Arthur Xie Wednesday, March 17, 2010 2:06 AM
    Wednesday, March 17, 2010 1:17 AM

All replies

  • If you bought only the keys without Windows 7 media there's a good chance they were illegally sold to you. The only way to know if the keys work is to install Windows 7 and try activating it. Also, be careful when downloading pirated copies of Windows (emule) as many contain viruses, malware, trogans, keyloggers, etc.

    Windows - Is It Genuine
    http://www.microsoft.com/genuine

    Microsoft - Piracy
    http://www.microsoft.com/piracy/default.aspx


    • Marked as answer by Arthur Xie Wednesday, March 17, 2010 2:06 AM
    Wednesday, March 17, 2010 1:17 AM
  • The easiest best way to verify that a microsoft key of any sort is valid is to call microsoft and give them the key. They can look up in their computer not only if the key is valid, but also tell you what version of 7 you have and if it is a retail or OEM version.
    Saturday, June 5, 2010 8:05 PM
  • I have had the exact same difficulty as others here, and I'd like to know if each Windows 7 product key is tied to some kind of serial number or something (that is not the actual product key) that I can use to call MS and have them tell me if the Windows product key tied to it is really valid?  That way, the seller could simply provide the serial number without disclosing the actual key, so the seller could verfiy its authenticity in advance.

    I purchased a privated Win 7 Ultimate key, which I used MGADiag to verify as soon as I installed it and then again after I activated it.  MGADiag initallly told me my key was 100% genuine, only to have MS inform me FIVE MONTHS LATER that I actually had a pirated product key  -- which, unfortunately was much, much to late to return it and get a refund.

    I now know the key I bought was invalid, but shouldn't MS take part of the blame for my receiving inaccurate information from MGADiag?

    If MS cannot tell me that my key is invalid within 30 days of successfully activating the OS, shouldn't MS be willing to offer people who are scammed in this manner a free product key to replace your invalid one?  After all, their software that bady misinformed me!

    Thanks  in advance for responding to my question and comment!

     

    Joel Gayman, Director

    Do-it-Yourself IT, Los Angeles

    • Proposed as answer by josepereira38 Thursday, December 30, 2010 2:34 PM
    Thursday, October 14, 2010 9:53 AM
  • ''call microsoft''

    You are kidding right. In this life, I have yet to speak to a living human being from Microsoft. The best you can hope for is telephone activation.  ....... 'Call Microsoft, yeah right. Good Luck with that.

    Monday, July 22, 2013 7:36 PM
  • If you bought only the keys without Windows 7 media there's a good chance they were illegally sold to you.

    This is incorrect - If you bought only the keys without the Windows 7 media, they are DEFINITELY counterfeit.  100% chance.  Never, ever, ever pay money for only keys.  They are ALWAYS going to be pirated/counterfeit/leaked/etc.

     

    One reason that they keys cannot always be detected as such by the MGA Diagnostic is that they are legit keys that have been leaked beyond the environment in which they are meant to be used.  After they start getting activated x number of times (x being a trade secret held by Microsoft), those keys are added to a blocked list and are then recognized as bogus.

     

    The disreputable types who sell them might have an idea of how many times a key can be activated before being blocked.  They then sell a few short to not get detected right away.  That gives them just enough time to cut ties with their sales channels and make off with the money.  But eventually those keys will get distributed via other means and become blocked.

    In short - only buy Windows from a known reputable source.  The Microsoft Store is a good place to start.



    Monday, July 22, 2013 8:43 PM
  • Let's be fair.
    I like to bitch as much as the next guy.  And I also like to be fair.

    Your experience is not my experience.
    I HAVE called Microsoft and spoken to polite, knowledgable, fair people around licensing issues and gotten useful, even generous help.
    If that were not so, I'd be bitching the loudest.

    But I have had good results phoning Microsoft.

    Monday, December 9, 2013 3:26 AM
  • I think there are a number of companies selling key with links to a Microsoft download site.

    We were scammed once, so I developed a few guidelines to prevent another scam:

    Before you buy ask:

    • Is the site you are purchasing from a Microsoft Partner? They will be listed with Microsoft.
    • Are they based in the US (or the country you are purchasing in)?
    • Do they have a number you can contact?
    • Do they pick up the phone quickly?
    • Do they have an acceptable degree of knowledge about the product?
    • How many bad reviews do they have? (it is easy to create fake good reviews, but harder to erase bad ones.)

    After you buy:

    • Open chat with Microsoft to verify that the key is what you were told it was.

    While phone calls may take a long time, the chat que is usually a minute or less.

    • If it is valid, go ahead and use the key with your product as soon as possible.

    At the time I purchased Office 2010 Professional, legitimate single copy retail prices ranged from $119 to over $500 on the internet.  So, it is still worth shopping around.  The above guidelines should help (had I followed them the first time, I would have easily avoided the scam and still have found an excellent price).

    Also, if you are purchasing multiple products, you might purchase just one at first, to verify the company is legit, before you risk a lot of money.


    • Edited by Sam1024 Wednesday, December 18, 2013 11:55 PM
    Wednesday, December 18, 2013 11:54 PM
  • If you bought only the keys without Windows 7 media there's a good chance they were illegally sold to you.

    This is incorrect - If you bought only the keys without the Windows 7 media, they are DEFINITELY counterfeit.  100% chance.  Never, ever, ever pay money for only keys.  They are ALWAYS going to be pirated/counterfeit/leaked/etc.

     

    One reason that they keys cannot always be detected as such by the MGA Diagnostic is that they are legit keys that have been leaked beyond the environment in which they are meant to be used.  After they start getting activated x number of times (x being a trade secret held by Microsoft), those keys are added to a blocked list and are then recognized as bogus.

     

    The disreputable types who sell them might have an idea of how many times a key can be activated before being blocked.  They then sell a few short to not get detected right away.  That gives them just enough time to cut ties with their sales channels and make off with the money.  But eventually those keys will get distributed via other means and become blocked.

    In short - only buy Windows from a known reputable source.  The Microsoft Store is a good place to start.

    If that is true, then why did Microsoft sell windows 8 key when Windows 8 was released. You could buy a key for 40$ and no media. You got a download link, nothing else. So Microsoft pirated their own company? Bullshit. You can buy legit keys many places on the Internet, Only thing is you have buy a new key if you change hardware (HDD. Memory. Motherboard)





    • Edited by Eriksvalby Thursday, December 11, 2014 11:43 AM
    Thursday, December 11, 2014 11:43 AM
  •  

    If that is true, then why did Microsoft sell windows 8 key when Windows 8 was released. You could buy a key for 40$ and no media. You got a download link, nothing else. So Microsoft pirated their own company? Bullshit. You can buy legit keys many places on the Internet, Only thing is you have buy a new key if you change hardware (HDD. Memory. Motherboard)

    The Windows 8 promotional was just that -  a promotional - directly from Microsoft.  There are no sales of genuine Windows keys without accompanying media unless you buy directly from Microsoft, Digital River or Dell.  While the "legit" keys you refer to may appear valid, they will absolutely go bad after a time.  Most such sales will work for a limited period, until the number of activations exceeds the limit, at which time Microsoft will block the Key from further activations and all current installs will become flagged as non-genuine.  The Windows 7 Genuine Issues Forum is full of people who believed what you say here and ended up throwing their money away.

    Please do not read this sentence. Please ignore the previous sentence.

    Thursday, December 11, 2014 3:43 PM
  • I found out I got 'bit' tonite.  Went to upgrade an OEM W7 to 8.1 and found out my W7 had been blocked.  Repeat .. OEM key.  Turns out, 'somehow' its product key was leaked outside of its intended environment ... I have no idea how ... and hence, .. I was now blocked.  Had to buy a new key ... on the phone, .. with MS tech for 99$.  That makes it a $200+ upgrade to 8.1.  I feel there is definitely something wrong with this picture.  That key was for an OEM copy ... and I have the OEM machine that goes with it.  They should have given me a new one.  JMHO.
    Tuesday, May 12, 2015 4:08 AM
  • If you have not yet done the conversion, post a diagnostic of the Win 7 install.

     

    MGA Diagnostic Report:

    To properly analyze and solve problems with Activation and Validation, we need to see a full copy of the diagnostic report produced by the MGADiag tool (download and save to desktop -http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=52012 )

    Once downloaded, run the tool.
    Click on the Continue button, after a short time, the Continue button will change to a Copy button.
    Click on the Copy button in the tool (ignore any error messages at this point), and then paste (using either r-click/Paste, or Ctrl+V ) into your post.

    One Issue Per Thread:

    Most Activation and Validation issues look the same, on the surface, but can have many different causes and fixes. This is why we ask for a diagnostic report and this is also why we ask that you create your own thread for your issue (in other words, don't post your issue in another person's thread). 

    It just becomes too complicated to try to troubleshoot multiple different issues in the same thread.

    New to the Forums?

    Note that if you are new to these forums, you may find that you are unable to post due to a restriction on the inclusion of links and pictures.
    Simply delete the only lines that contain links -  this will allow the remainder of the report to upload (and those lines are not generally critical to the report anyhow)


    Please do not read this sentence. Please ignore the previous sentence.

    Tuesday, May 12, 2015 6:07 PM
  • I am currently dealing with this issue with windows 7 that I purchased from techsupplyking in March of 2014.  I installed and activated my downloaded copy of Windows 7 professional in March and monitored it with windows automatic updates for a month and a half and it still showed as genuine.  Because the software was reasonably priced, I was skeptical and I did a google search to determine if it was legitimate.  There were no issues with the windows 7.  There were some issues with Office where it looked like some people who didn't know what they were doing had problems with the download and install process.  Also, they were and still are listed as a Microsoft partner.

    Due to the success of this initial install, I determined that it was legitimate and I purchase several more copies. Far from this being illegitimate, I believed that they had Microsoft's blessing. I provide support for people who can barely afford their computers, but can't do business without them.  Here was Microsoft forcing them to replace their working XP operating systems for no reason.  Microsoft could have offered a discounted upgrade package, but they didn't.  It was my belief that they sanctioned this gray market and I continued to believe that for a year.  

    After a year, the first computer with this software showed up as not genuine.  This forced me to spend alot of time trying to understand the convoluted Microsoft licensing policies.  I downloaded the MGAdiag tool and tested the computers that had software from TechSupplyKing.  They all tested as genuine except for the first one.  From the diagnostics report, I discovered that what I had purchased was a volume license key.  I researched volume licensing and I still don't know all the possible permutations.  I saw one reference to a one time key as well as multiple use keys.  Apparently, I have the key that can be used a limited number of times and Microsoft keeps track.  After the limit is reached, the key cannot be used for activation.  I tried and it reports as an invalid key.

    After much research, I found the numbers for volume license support.  I called and actually spoke to a person.  After much time on hold and being hung up on twice, I got through the process and the support tech explained that the product key was blocked and marked as suspected pirated.  He further explained that multiple attempts to activate with this key have caused it to be flagged.   I said that I knew that I had a Genuine copy of windows, because Microsoft has been telling me that it is Genuine for the last year.  He acknowledged that it was indeed genuine for that year.  I then asked him what I had to do to make it Genuine again.  He said that I needed to activate with a valid product key.  I told him that I wasn't going to buy windows twice.  How can windows be genuine one day and not genuine the next?  It can't be, unless the definition of Genuine is changed by Microsoft to anything that it wants.

    Since the first installation has reported the not genuine error, others have turned.  On one machine, I ran MGAdiag on a Saturday and on Monday, it was reporting not genuine.  Apparently Microsoft will decide to invalidate a product key and this does not affect the genuine software that is out there.  However, Microsoft, through windows updates will periodically check for Genuineness.  One test is apparently whether the product key is valid or not.  If it is not valid, the software is deemed not Genuine and must be activated by a valid product key.  In other words, the user of genuine Microsoft windows must buy it again in order to continue using it.  Supposedly, because the product key has been misused.

    There are two things that I would like to see.  One is a version of MGAdiag that tests the validity of the product key and two, a setting that will block windows update from invalidating windows based on the product key if it has been more than 90 days since activation.

    I am going to keep calling volume license support to see if they will do the right thing and activate my genuine windows even with the bad key.

    Sorry for the long rant, but I don't have many options and complaining is one of them.  I hope this helps someone.

    Sunday, June 14, 2015 4:44 PM
  • The installs in question, if not genuine, will not ever be considered legitimate.  There will never ever be a setting to block Windows Update from checking the Genuine Status of an OS.  If you have not entered into a Volume License Agreement with Microsoft, they will never activate pirated installs.  The installs were never "legitimate and then suddenly deemed counterfeit".  They were counterfeit from the start because the terms of Volume Distribution were violated by the seller.  This is an issue you need to take up with them.  You can report them to Microsoft for distributing counterfeit installs, and I would most definitely demand a full refund on all the installs you purchased from them.  But do not expect Microsoft to change their stance on this issue.

      

    To confirm the status of the OS in question, please create a new thread in the Windows 7 Genuine Issues forum and post your MGADiag results there.  The MGADiagnostic is just that - a diagnostic.  It is not capable of determining what is being done with a particular install.  It can only report the licensing information for the computer upon which it is installed.


    Please do not read this sentence. Please ignore the previous sentence.

    Monday, June 15, 2015 4:15 PM
  • The easiest way is, yes, check with Microsoft, but rather than try to connect by phone, just navigate here and check by comuter: https://www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate/
    • Edited by zx29b Friday, February 26, 2016 3:36 AM
    Friday, February 26, 2016 3:29 AM
  • Just check here:  https://www.microsoft.com/genuine/validate/
    Friday, February 26, 2016 3:41 AM
  • It is telling that every link posted on how to verify your license - over a multi-year period - is a dead link now.

    Microsoft has no sense of continuity; what works today is sure to be gone tomorrow.

    Shut up and pay.

    Tuesday, July 17, 2018 12:23 PM
  • Absolutely right I also had this experience and get very positive attitude from Microsoft support regarding license issues.

    Thanks 

    Wednesday, November 20, 2019 5:02 AM