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New server with Windows 2019 (Cluster Hyperv 2012 R2) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I have a hyperv 2012 R2 cluster with two nodes.

    We will replace these two nodes with new servers and we already want to implement with Windows 2019.

    What is the best strategy for doing this migration?

    Option 1

    Create a new cluster and add the CSV volumes to the new cluster and import the VMs?

    Option 2

    Include the new Windows 2019 nodes in the existing cluster with the Windows 2012 nodes, do the live migration?

    Thank you.
    Sunday, June 16, 2019 4:23 AM

Answers

All replies

  • Hello,

    The best option would be option 1, as you cannot add Windows Server 2019 nodes to your Windows Server 2012 cluster (it would only work if the cluster level and cluster nodes were Windows Server 2016).

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Sunday, June 16, 2019 9:01 AM
  • Hi,

    Thanks for posting in our forum!

    Obviously, the second method is not feasible.

    In addition, we can not upgrade our cluster from 2012R2 to 2019 directly,

    Cluster OS Rolling Upgrade can be used to upgrade Windows Server 2012 R2 Failover Clusters to Windows Server 2016 – but Windows Server 2012 R2 clusters cannot be directly upgraded to Windows Server 2019 while the cluster is running.

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/failover-clustering/cluster-operating-system-rolling-upgrade

    Therefore, the first way is our best choice.

    Hope this can help you. Please help me mark the useful reply as an answer. Thanks in advance!

    Cheers,

    Daniel


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
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    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:55 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for the answer.

    But is Hyperv 2019 able to import the VMs created in Hyperv 2012?

    I saw some people who said yes. But I tried and presented a strange flaw.

    Monday, June 17, 2019 4:25 AM
  • Yes, you can import Windows Server 2012 virtual machines to a Windows Server 2019 Hyper-V host, as long as the Hyper-V configuration version is 5.0 (the minimum).

    For more information, see:

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/virtualization/hyper-v/deploy/upgrade-virtual-machine-version-in-hyper-v-on-windows-or-windows-server#supported-vm-configuration-versions-for-long-term-servicing-hosts


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    Monday, June 17, 2019 5:10 AM
  • Does not work. I made several attempts, same mistake.
    Monday, June 17, 2019 6:22 AM
  • Does this VM have any checkpoints/mounted ISO?

    You might have to export the VMs first and then import them.


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    Monday, June 17, 2019 6:43 AM
  • You can see here:

    http://tompopov.blogspot.com/2011/04/operation-cannot-be-performed-while.html

    In addition, you can try recreate VM with VHD.

    Daniel


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, June 17, 2019 6:44 AM
    Moderator
  • Does this VM have any checkpoints/mounted ISO?

    You might have to export the VMs first and then import them.


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    There is not. It is a new VM, no configuration, no operating system.
    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:08 PM
  • You can see here:

    http://tompopov.blogspot.com/2011/04/operation-cannot-be-performed-while.html

    In addition, you can try recreate VM with VHD.

    Daniel


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Yes, this is an alternative. But we have many VMs. I was frustrated in a new environment, with no configuration, no OS and no importing. While I see some people report that it works.

    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:09 PM
  • You will most likely have to export the VMs then before moving the CSV volume to another cluster, then import the VMs in the new cluster, the new cluster cannot identify the VMs as they are now.

    To make it faster you can make use of the Export-VM cmdlet.


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:11 PM
  • You will most likely have to export the VMs then before moving the CSV volume to another cluster, then import the VMs in the new cluster, the new cluster cannot identify the VMs as they are now.

    To make it faster you can make use of the Export-VM cmdlet.


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    I found a documentation that says that sometimes, even with the VM turned off, the windows process is still in use. But I already checked and there is nothing.

    I tested it too. I imagined that the procedure was incorrect.

    But when I direct the import to the exported VM, it has the same error.

    I also found other documentation saying that in 2012 there was a similar BUG that was fixed with a KB. But it is not possible! I'm importing into a new updated 2019 environment.

    The strange thing is that the same directory where I have the VMs, I do the import in 2016 and it works !!!!

    The problem is exclusively with 2019.
    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:18 PM
  • I ran a test using the command line:

    C: \> Import-VM -Path 'D: \ Hyper-V \ VM2012 \ Virtual Machines \ 85CF52A8-B39C-490E-AED7-D890031B41B8.xml'
    Import-VM: Deleting 'VM2012' failed.
    The operation can not be performed while the object is in its current state.
    At line: 1 char: 1
    + Import-VM -Path 'D: \ Hyper-V \ VM2012 \ Virtual Machines \ 85CF52A8-B39C-490 ...
    + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        + CategoryInfo: InvalidOperation: (:) [Import-VM], VirtualizationException
        + FullyQualifiedErrorId: InvalidState, Microsoft.HyperV.PowerShell.Commands.ImportVM

    Import-VM: Failed to create virtual machine.
    The operation failed because a virtual machine with the same identifier already exists. Select a new identifier and try the operation again.
    At line: 1 char: 1
    + Import-VM -Path 'D: \ Hyper-V \ VM2012 \ Virtual Machines \ 85CF52A8-B39C-490 ...
    + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        + CategoryInfo: Not Specified: (:) [Import-VM], VirtualizationException
        + FullyQualifiedErrorId: OperationFailed, Microsoft.HyperV.PowerShell.Commands.ImportVM
    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:19 PM
  • PS C:\> Compare-VM -Path 'D:\Export\VM01\Virtual Machines\7D90AB0F-DEE5-4BB7-86BB-F94CA8CCBDDC.vmcx'
    Compare-VM : Deleting 'VM01' failed.
    The operation cannot be performed while the object is in its current state.
    At line:1 char:1
    + Compare-VM -Path 'D:\Export\VM01\Virtual Machines\7D90AB0F-DEE5-4BB7- ...
    + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (:) [Compare-VM], VirtualizationException
        + FullyQualifiedErrorId : InvalidState,Microsoft.HyperV.PowerShell.Commands.CompareVM

    Compare-VM : Failed to create virtual machine.
    The operation failed because a virtual machine with the same identifier already exists. Select a new identifier and try the operation again.
    At line:1 char:1
    + Compare-VM -Path 'D:\Export\VM01\Virtual Machines\7D90AB0F-DEE5-4BB7- ...
    + ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        + CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [Compare-VM], VirtualizationException
        + FullyQualifiedErrorId : OperationFailed,Microsoft.HyperV.PowerShell.Commands.CompareVM
    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:22 PM
  • It's interesting that you were able to import to Windows Server 2016, I just remembered that both Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019 use a binary configuration file.

    In previous versions under Windows Server 2016, they use an .XML configuration file, the configuration file is nothing more than just a definition file for the virtual machine, the newer virtual machines uses .VMCX configuration file.

    If creating new VMs and attaching the VHD(x) files is too much of work, you could move the VMs to the Windows Server 2016 host and from there move them to the Windows Server 2019.

    Use live migration without Failover Clustering to move a virtual machine


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Monday, June 17, 2019 2:41 PM
  • It's interesting that you were able to import to Windows Server 2016, I just remembered that both Windows Server 2016 and Windows Server 2019 use a binary configuration file.

    In previous versions under Windows Server 2016, they use an .XML configuration file, the configuration file is nothing more than just a definition file for the virtual machine, the newer virtual machines uses .VMCX configuration file.

    If creating new VMs and attaching the VHD(x) files is too much of work, you could move the VMs to the Windows Server 2016 host and from there move them to the Windows Server 2019.

    Use live migration without Failover Clustering to move a virtual machine


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    I thought so too. We will deploy two new servers with 2019 and we have two 2012 in cluster.

    My goal is to reduce the work effort and downtime.

    I do not have disk space for drives.

    What I thought to do since I am "problematic" ... rs

    - Install the new server 1 with 2016, include in the cluster and make live migration from the old to the new that has more feature.
    - Upgrade the cluster level to 2016;
    - Install the new server 2 with 2019, include in the cluster and make free migraton from server 1 to server 2;
    - Reinstall server 1 with (2016> 2019), include in the cluster and balance the VMs between the hosts;
    - Upgrade cluster level to 2019.
    Monday, June 17, 2019 3:31 PM
  • That's one way of doing it yes, rather that than doing in-place upgrades :-)


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    • Marked as answer by Sandrix Helps Tuesday, June 18, 2019 9:31 PM
    Monday, June 17, 2019 3:36 PM