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"Install repair" removed from Windows 7?

    Question

  • I distinctly recall under Windows XP there was 2 ways of repairing an install.

    The recovery console has some tools which allow you to fix up a copy of XP but you can also begin to install Windows, it then detects your install and asks if you'd like to repair it, this mode installs 'over the top' of your existing install but maintains your registry (or at least parts of it) as well as your user profile etc.

     

    This was a great feature, I was pretty sure it's included in 7, however I'm in need of it right now and it's actually prompting to do the rename method of install for the Windows path, effectively creating a 100% fresh install.

    I realise a repair isn't a sure fire fix but I'm 99% confident my issue with my install of 7 is actually quite minor, does anyone know if I'm doing something wrong here or is this option now removed? I simply can't see a way of installing in repair mode.

     

    Anyonw?

    Saturday, January 08, 2011 6:32 AM

Answers

  • Certainly, you can do a "repair upgrade" to install Windows 7 over Windows 7 (using the same media as the first time, of course - edition, language, architecture, etc. must be identical). Here's a detailed How-To: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/3413-repair-install.html.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Saturday, January 08, 2011 11:46 AM
  • I was not aware that you can't boot into Windows itself. You could try a "Startup Repair" to restore missing or corrupted boot files (F8 after BIOS), then proceed like recommended above. If that also fails, the last method is doing a straightforward "repair upgrade": Insert the bootable Windows DVD, set BIOS to start from DVD, shutdown the PC and restart it, then on the installation screen select "Upgrade", not "Custom Install". If Setup detects an existent Windows installation (which is guaranteed when you start the whole process from within Windows and may fail here, should the installer not find sufficient boot informations and certain registry settings), it will "upgrade" Win 7 to a working Win 7. If that doesn't work, your system is F.U.B.A.R. Btw, I can't see any major differences to XP in that respect.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Saturday, January 08, 2011 3:19 PM

All replies

  • Certainly, you can do a "repair upgrade" to install Windows 7 over Windows 7 (using the same media as the first time, of course - edition, language, architecture, etc. must be identical). Here's a detailed How-To: http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/3413-repair-install.html.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Saturday, January 08, 2011 11:46 AM
  • This functionality is effectively useless as it requires the ability to be able to boot Windows itself.

    XP could do this from a bootable CD and detect and repair the existing install.

     

    Saturday, January 08, 2011 11:49 AM
  • This functionality is effectively useless as it requires the ability to be able to boot Windows itself.

    XP could do this from a bootable CD and detect and repair the existing install.

     


    hi ,

    new version , new options , ....

    one cant compare 7 with xp , ...

    have a nice day


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    Saturday, January 08, 2011 1:12 PM
  • Very helpful, options removed from newer OS

    have a nice day

    Saturday, January 08, 2011 1:30 PM
  • I was not aware that you can't boot into Windows itself. You could try a "Startup Repair" to restore missing or corrupted boot files (F8 after BIOS), then proceed like recommended above. If that also fails, the last method is doing a straightforward "repair upgrade": Insert the bootable Windows DVD, set BIOS to start from DVD, shutdown the PC and restart it, then on the installation screen select "Upgrade", not "Custom Install". If Setup detects an existent Windows installation (which is guaranteed when you start the whole process from within Windows and may fail here, should the installer not find sufficient boot informations and certain registry settings), it will "upgrade" Win 7 to a working Win 7. If that doesn't work, your system is F.U.B.A.R. Btw, I can't see any major differences to XP in that respect.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Saturday, January 08, 2011 3:19 PM
  • I was not aware that you can't boot into Windows itself. You could try a "Startup Repair" to restore missing or corrupted boot files (F8 after BIOS), then proceed like recommended above. If that also fails, the last method is doing a straightforward "repair upgrade": Insert the bootable Windows DVD, set BIOS to start from DVD, shutdown the PC and restart it, then on the installation screen select "Upgrade", not "Custom Install". If Setup detects an existent Windows installation (which is guaranteed when you start the whole process from within Windows and may fail here, should the installer not find sufficient boot informations and certain registry settings), it will "upgrade" Win 7 to a working Win 7. If that doesn't work, your system is F.U.B.A.R. Btw, I can't see any major differences to XP in that respect.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")


    hi ,

    you can boot in it , ... !!

    just done that this morning , before posting , ...

    its just some one who obviously does not care to check all the options there are in win 7 ( or support ), in fact when comparing from win 93 on to 7 , its been evolving constantly to better options , ...

    have a nice day


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    Saturday, January 08, 2011 3:25 PM
  • I don't know what you're saying isn't there, I booted to the Windows 7 CD and did a repair and it worked just fine.

    Keep in mind there are some minor differences in the experience, because Windows 7 uses the new "image based" method of installation, which is vastly superior.  It's also why a clean install of Windows 7 takes about 10 minutes instead of the 30-45 with XP.

     

     


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    Saturday, January 08, 2011 4:05 PM
  • Very helpful, options removed from newer OS

    have a nice day


    no they are not , .... there are new and other options , ...


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    None of which allow you to repair from boot media, they all seem to expect the user to be able to boot the OS itself.

    Ridiculous.

    Sunday, January 09, 2011 1:18 AM

  • I was not aware that you can't boot into Windows itself. You could try a "Startup Repair" to restore missing or corrupted boot files (F8 after BIOS), then proceed like recommended above. If that also fails, the last method is doing a straightforward "repair upgrade": Insert the bootable Windows DVD, set BIOS to start from DVD, shutdown the PC and restart it, then on the installation screen select "Upgrade", not "Custom Install". If Setup detects an existent Windows installation (which is guaranteed when you start the whole process from within Windows and may fail here, should the installer not find sufficient boot informations and certain registry settings), it will "upgrade" Win 7 to a working Win 7. If that doesn't work, your system is F.U.B.A.R. Btw, I can't see any major differences to XP in that respect.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")


    hi ,

    you can boot in it , ... !!

    just done that this morning , before posting , ...

    its just some one who obviously does not care to check all the options there are in win 7 ( or support ), in fact when comparing from win 93 on to 7 , its been evolving constantly to better options , ...

    have a nice day


    Scan with OneCare + Support ENDING for windows Vista & XP ! + Plagued by the Privacy Center? REMOVE IT + Threat Research & Response Blog + Sysinternals Live tools + TRANSLATOR + Photosynth + Microsoft Security + Microsoft SUPPORT + PIVOT from Live Labs + Microsoft Live Labs + Get OFFICE 2010 FREE ! 

    Derp, it's best if you stop replying.

    I can't boot in to the OS, a couple of boot files were corrupt, the bootable media has a boot repair option only, the old option to re-install windows INTO the existing install, maintaining the users / registry has been removed.

     

    Sunday, January 09, 2011 1:19 AM
  • Hopefully, I'm not the derp. You can't switch arguments as you like it - first it's "my issue with my install of 7 is actually quite minor", now we are at "a couple of boot files were corrupt". I'll happily repeat me: You can try to restore those boot files with a "Startup Repair" (F8 on system start). If that doesn't work, you are in the very same situation like on XP. You can try a "repair in-place upgrade" from your bootable media, i.e. from the Windows installation DVD (that this disc only contains a "boot repair option" is a nice invention) but the success of this approach depends from the integrity of some of your system files (neither the old "repair install" in XP nor the new "upgrade" option to install Windows 7 over itself will work if no existing OS is detected). To put it in other words: How do you think you can do an in-place upgrade from Vista to Windows 7, preserving your programs, settings and personal files, if exactly the same process would be impossible from Windows 7 to Windows 7? Calm down and reconsider what you want to claim.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 3:29 AM
  • Hopefully, I'm not the derp. You can't switch arguments as you like it - first it's "my issue with my install of 7 is actually quite minor", now we are at "a couple of boot files were corrupt". I'll happily repeat me: You can try to restore those boot files with a "Startup Repair" (F8 on system start). If that doesn't work, you are in the very same situation like on XP. You can try a "repair in-place upgrade" from your bootable media, i.e. from the Windows installation DVD (that this disc only contains a "boot repair option" is a nice invention) but the success of this approach depends from the integrity of some of your system files (neither the old "repair install" in XP nor the new "upgrade" option to install Windows 7 over itself will work if no existing OS is detected). To put it in other words: How do you think you can do an in-place upgrade from Vista to Windows 7, preserving your programs, settings and personal files, if exactly the same process would be impossible from Windows 7 to Windows 7? Calm down and reconsider what you want to claim.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")


    hi ,

    when some people have put it in their minds that it will not go , one cant convince them otherwise , ...

    i have given up long time ago trying to convince people and point out the facts , ... its better to invest time in people who do want help

    have a nice day


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    Sunday, January 09, 2011 3:38 AM
  • You may want to check the whole windows 7 first. There have been changes aside from the appearance.  It should be somewhere down the control panel to be visible.

    http://www.byb.me/ - a free URL shortening service with a twist.
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 8:58 AM
  • Hopefully, I'm not the derp. You can't switch arguments as you like it - first it's "my issue with my install of 7 is actually quite minor", now we are at "a couple of boot files were corrupt". I'll happily repeat me: You can try to restore those boot files with a "Startup Repair" (F8 on system start). If that doesn't work, you are in the very same situation like on XP. You can try a "repair in-place upgrade" from your bootable media, i.e. from the Windows installation DVD (that this disc only contains a "boot repair option" is a nice invention) but the success of this approach depends from the integrity of some of your system files (neither the old "repair install" in XP nor the new "upgrade" option to install Windows 7 over itself will work if no existing OS is detected). To put it in other words: How do you think you can do an in-place upgrade from Vista to Windows 7, preserving your programs, settings and personal files, if exactly the same process would be impossible from Windows 7 to Windows 7? Calm down and reconsider what you want to claim.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")

    There is no longer an option to repair inside the existing install, it attempts to rename the existing folders (full install) OR prompts the user to try from within windows (upgrade) - there is also a startup repair which doesn't fix all broken startup options (oddly enough, just like XP!)

     

     

    Monday, January 10, 2011 4:05 AM
  • Hopefully, I'm not the derp. You can't switch arguments as you like it - first it's "my issue with my install of 7 is actually quite minor", now we are at "a couple of boot files were corrupt". I'll happily repeat me: You can try to restore those boot files with a "Startup Repair" (F8 on system start). If that doesn't work, you are in the very same situation like on XP. You can try a "repair in-place upgrade" from your bootable media, i.e. from the Windows installation DVD (that this disc only contains a "boot repair option" is a nice invention) but the success of this approach depends from the integrity of some of your system files (neither the old "repair install" in XP nor the new "upgrade" option to install Windows 7 over itself will work if no existing OS is detected). To put it in other words: How do you think you can do an in-place upgrade from Vista to Windows 7, preserving your programs, settings and personal files, if exactly the same process would be impossible from Windows 7 to Windows 7? Calm down and reconsider what you want to claim.
    "192 GB ought to be enough for anybody." (from the miniseries "Next Generation's Jokes")

    There is no longer an option to repair inside the existing install, it attempts to rename the existing folders (full install) OR prompts the user to try from within windows (upgrade) - there is also a startup repair which doesn't fix all broken startup options (oddly enough, just like XP!)

     

     


    please just wake up , will you ?

    we have just explained it to you and still you dont believe it , ....

     

    *sigh*


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    Monday, January 10, 2011 11:47 AM
  • Explained that the option has been removed? If that's the case then sorry I must have misread. Doesn't change the fact it's very disapointing.
    Monday, January 10, 2011 11:51 AM
  • Explained that the option has been removed? If that's the case then sorry I must have misread. Doesn't change the fact it's very disapointing.


    the option is not removed ,.... read whats written instead of stubornly posting the same over and over ,.... and check before you post what you are talking about


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    Tuesday, January 11, 2011 12:14 AM
  • The option to repair install from bootable media no longer works.   You are prompted to either rename the existing Windows folders OR "boot into Windows and try running again"

    It's probably best if you stop posting, you may want to also consider killing yourself.


    hey man , no need to be rude , ...

     

    we try to explain to you it is still there , we try to help you and all that you do is keep repeating thats its not there , .....

     

    its not the first time you act like this , and your remark about killing myself is really low ! dont you have self respect or respect for others ?


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    Tuesday, January 11, 2011 8:28 AM
  • Point being they could have kept it simple for neophites like me and just made a repair button.  I still don't know how to do a repair install accept I am guessing boot to the windows 7 disc.  They could easily creat a macro to do all that for you, so you even know it's possilbe, by just having a repair option.  Just because something is possible doesn't mean it is obvious or in a way that serves the average customer. 
    Friday, January 14, 2011 3:28 AM
  • Some thickheaded people. Anyways - the option does not exist anymore the way it did in Win XP.

    In Windows XP, if you couldn't boot, and nothing worked (chkdsk, system file replacement, etc), you would boot from WinXP CD, go to the screen where you select the partition to install to, wizard will see that you have old Win XP install and gives you an option to repair (look at the bottom of the screen - R to repair). What it did is basically install on top of the old installation (asking for drivers DURING installation) while replacing any existing files and rewriting some of the registry keys, and system configuration, and reset services to default (while not touching 3rd party services). When you got back into windows, you still had all user accounts, all files, all applications, and all drivers. It basically did the ultimate system file "reset." That thing was EXTREMELY helpful at fixing the OS without losing user configuration.

    In Windows 7 (just like Vista), you have System repair that you can either run from F8 menu or disk. All it does is run chkdsk for you, checks mbr and boot manager, and some system file verification scripts. That thing helps me 20% of the time. There is, however, an Upgrade on top of the old install (just like I described for WinXP) but you HAVE TO RUN IT FROM WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT. If Windows doesn't boot - you don't have that option. THAT'S IT! You can only do fresh install from the disk that would put your Windows, Program Files, and Users folders in to %root%\Windows.old and you will end up with a clean system. Sure you can cut-paste the files, but all settings are gone, all customizations are gone, you have a clean registry, so all applications have to be reinstalled, email accounts recreated, etc, etc, etc. 

    So stop arguing about this. Point is - troubleshooting/repair functionality has been reduced in Windows 7. I will take normal Repair Install over System Repair ANY DAY.

    Saturday, February 19, 2011 1:05 AM
  • Some thickheaded people. Anyways - the option does not exist anymore the way it did in Win XP.

    In Windows XP, if you couldn't boot, and nothing worked (chkdsk, system file replacement, etc), you would boot from WinXP CD, go to the screen where you select the partition to install to, wizard will see that you have old Win XP install and gives you an option to repair (look at the bottom of the screen - R to repair). What it did is basically install on top of the old installation (asking for drivers DURING installation) while replacing any existing files and rewriting some of the registry keys, and system configuration, and reset services to default (while not touching 3rd party services). When you got back into windows, you still had all user accounts, all files, all applications, and all drivers. It basically did the ultimate system file "reset." That thing was EXTREMELY helpful at fixing the OS without losing user configuration.

    In Windows 7 (just like Vista), you have System repair that you can either run from F8 menu or disk. All it does is run chkdsk for you, checks mbr and boot manager, and some system file verification scripts. That thing helps me 20% of the time. There is, however, an Upgrade on top of the old install (just like I described for WinXP) but you HAVE TO RUN IT FROM WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT. If Windows doesn't boot - you don't have that option. THAT'S IT! You can only do fresh install from the disk that would put your Windows, Program Files, and Users folders in to %root%\Windows.old and you will end up with a clean system. Sure you can cut-paste the files, but all settings are gone, all customizations are gone, you have a clean registry, so all applications have to be reinstalled, email accounts recreated, etc, etc, etc. 

    So stop arguing about this. Point is - troubleshooting/repair functionality has been reduced in Windows 7. I will take normal Repair Install over System Repair ANY DAY.


    huh , instead of being reduced it has been expanded , .... you should check BEFORE you post , ....

    just a little bit of research would have told you that , on a windows 7 above basic software suite !


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    Tuesday, February 22, 2011 1:09 PM
  • The option, as implimented in XP (correctly) is removed and no longer possible under Windows 7.

     

    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 1:29 AM
  • Point being they could have kept it simple for neophites like me and just made a repair button.  I still don't know how to do a repair install accept I am guessing boot to the windows 7 disc.  They could easily creat a macro to do all that for you, so you even know it's possilbe, by just having a repair option.  Just because something is possible doesn't mean it is obvious or in a way that serves the average customer. 

    There are 2 repairs.

    One repair will attempt to fix the files which are on the current install of Windows  - specifically the boot files / boot loader system files, mostly in the root directory.
    The other, old XP repair, you would basically start to install Windows itself, it would then say "found a copy of Windows, do you want to repair?" - it then re-installs windows, over the top of your existing install yet maintains (most) of your settings and your profile, it was very handy.

    This is the feature which is no longer available.

    Also, Windows restore from a backup is awful, having now been through the pain of what caused this thread, about a month ago. I've stopped using Windows backup and switched to Acronis True Image home again - it works and works properly and reliably (I just had to restore Windows, again! unfortunately and managed to roll back to a 7 day old image in about 20 minutes. I'm all up and running (don't install SP1!)

    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 1:33 AM
  • Some thickheaded people. Anyways - the option does not exist anymore the way it did in Win XP.

    In Windows XP, if you couldn't boot, and nothing worked (chkdsk, system file replacement, etc), you would boot from WinXP CD, go to the screen where you select the partition to install to, wizard will see that you have old Win XP install and gives you an option to repair (look at the bottom of the screen - R to repair). What it did is basically install on top of the old installation (asking for drivers DURING installation) while replacing any existing files and rewriting some of the registry keys, and system configuration, and reset services to default (while not touching 3rd party services). When you got back into windows, you still had all user accounts, all files, all applications, and all drivers. It basically did the ultimate system file "reset." That thing was EXTREMELY helpful at fixing the OS without losing user configuration.

    In Windows 7 (just like Vista), you have System repair that you can either run from F8 menu or disk. All it does is run chkdsk for you, checks mbr and boot manager, and some system file verification scripts. That thing helps me 20% of the time. There is, however, an Upgrade on top of the old install (just like I described for WinXP) but you HAVE TO RUN IT FROM WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT. If Windows doesn't boot - you don't have that option. THAT'S IT! You can only do fresh install from the disk that would put your Windows, Program Files, and Users folders in to %root%\Windows.old and you will end up with a clean system. Sure you can cut-paste the files, but all settings are gone, all customizations are gone, you have a clean registry, so all applications have to be reinstalled, email accounts recreated, etc, etc, etc. 

    So stop arguing about this. Point is - troubleshooting/repair functionality has been reduced in Windows 7. I will take normal Repair Install over System Repair ANY DAY.


    Thank you! Someone who writes it up correctly.

    EXACTLY THIS - the Windows XP repair was incredibly powerful, you could bring 99.9 of systems back to life with that and maintain a lot of little awkward settings without requiring a full re-install. (despite the fact it LOOKS like you actually had just done one)

    The Windows 7 option is significantly less powerful and awkward, but no one here either understands what I'm saying or they are being ignorant.  "Upgrading" over the top of my existing install is pretty difficult if I CAN'T BOOT INTO IT in the first place!  hence the XP one from CD was amazing :/

     

    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 1:36 AM
  • Some thickheaded people. Anyways - the option does not exist anymore the way it did in Win XP.

    In Windows XP, if you couldn't boot, and nothing worked (chkdsk, system file replacement, etc), you would boot from WinXP CD, go to the screen where you select the partition to install to, wizard will see that you have old Win XP install and gives you an option to repair (look at the bottom of the screen - R to repair). What it did is basically install on top of the old installation (asking for drivers DURING installation) while replacing any existing files and rewriting some of the registry keys, and system configuration, and reset services to default (while not touching 3rd party services). When you got back into windows, you still had all user accounts, all files, all applications, and all drivers. It basically did the ultimate system file "reset." That thing was EXTREMELY helpful at fixing the OS without losing user configuration.

    In Windows 7 (just like Vista), you have System repair that you can either run from F8 menu or disk. All it does is run chkdsk for you, checks mbr and boot manager, and some system file verification scripts. That thing helps me 20% of the time. There is, however, an Upgrade on top of the old install (just like I described for WinXP) but you HAVE TO RUN IT FROM WINDOWS ENVIRONMENT. If Windows doesn't boot - you don't have that option. THAT'S IT! You can only do fresh install from the disk that would put your Windows, Program Files, and Users folders in to %root%\Windows.old and you will end up with a clean system. Sure you can cut-paste the files, but all settings are gone, all customizations are gone, you have a clean registry, so all applications have to be reinstalled, email accounts recreated, etc, etc, etc. 

    So stop arguing about this. Point is - troubleshooting/repair functionality has been reduced in Windows 7. I will take normal Repair Install over System Repair ANY DAY.


    huh , instead of being reduced it has been expanded , .... you should check BEFORE you post , ....

    just a little bit of research would have told you that , on a windows 7 above basic software suite !


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    Are you being deliberately dense?

    It has not been expanded in any way, it is now worse than it was.

    do you even have win 7 ? cause your remarks make no sense what so ever , time after time again and again we have explained each time you had a problem where and how , each time you stay with your argument and base it on thin air , .... you actually have no idea what so ever neither do you seem to be able to read the facts , plain simple facts ! the options and tools in windows 7 are far greater ! its a fact ! or do you have maybe a basic version ? it has been expanded , worked on , tested n labs and by students in the uk , from the time codename longhorn on , its a new system and huge parts are fully rewritten , ... ! the fact that support is able everyday to help thousand of users and actually fix things is he proof that its far better , not only that but the amount it takes to fix things has been decreased , ....

    so before you start an other flamewar ( again ) learn the facts !

     


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    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 2:07 AM
  • Listen, dopey - what part of stascoms post can't you comprehend?  Microsofts repair options from the bootable media did not fix my problem, I tried a system restore, I attempted a repair of the boot files, the OS itself was corrupt and required either some files be replaced or a fresh registry.

    The XP repair does this, the Windows 7 repair (from BOOTABLE DISC) does not.

    What part of that don't you get? - Stop posting.

     

    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 3:06 AM
  • Listen, dopey - what part of stascoms post can't you comprehend?  Microsofts repair options from the bootable media did not fix my problem, I tried a system restore, I attempted a repair of the boot files, the OS itself was corrupt and required either some files be replaced or a fresh registry.

    The XP repair does this, the Windows 7 repair (from BOOTABLE DISC) does not.

    What part of that don't you get? - Stop posting.

     


    why dont you get XP again ? ill send you a free copy

    instead of asking me and others to stop posting or giving remarks about this or that that are completely wrong , why dont you learn first your facts ?

     


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    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 6:23 PM
  • I'm quite happy with 7, it's a good operating system.  That doesn't change the fact the feature I'm talking about is no longer included - yet you simply can't read.  Hence me asking you to stop posting, because you look stupid. Is that what you want? The world to see you look stupid on a forum?   I've tried helping you but you keep persisting and ignoring what's been said.  Why I don't know.     My problem is long since fixed, my copy of Windows is running fine.  This doesn't change the fact that an INSTALL repair from BOOT MEDIA is no longer a viable way of fixing a windows install.  -  This thread will help others in the future fortunately - it will also embarass you.

     

    Wednesday, February 23, 2011 9:10 PM
  • I'm quite happy with 7, it's a good operating system.  That doesn't change the fact the feature I'm talking about is no longer included - yet you simply can't read.  Hence me asking you to stop posting, because you look stupid. Is that what you want? The world to see you look stupid on a forum?   I've tried helping you but you keep persisting and ignoring what's been said.  Why I don't know.     My problem is long since fixed, my copy of Windows is running fine.  This doesn't change the fact that an INSTALL repair from BOOT MEDIA is no longer a viable way of fixing a windows install.  -  This thread will help others in the future fortunately - it will also embarass you.

     


      who is always claiming this or that is not good in win 7 ? who refuses to listen when people try to help you ? you

    and if you dont get your wayyou start with insults or make a DL , .....

    why do you think so many people ignore your posts ? or dont bother to answer , ....

    fact is you have more repair options and far greater advanced at that then there ever was before in the OS , plain simple fact !

    now wheter you like being stuborn or are just bored and love to pick fights i dont know and i dont care , ....


    Scan with OneCare + Support ENDING for windows Vista & XP ! + Plagued by the Privacy Center? REMOVE IT + Threat Research & Response Blog + Sysinternals Live tools + TRANSLATOR + Photosynth + Microsoft Security + Microsoft SUPPORT + PIVOT from Live Labs + Microsoft Live Labs + Get OFFICE 2010 FREE ! 
    Thursday, February 24, 2011 5:17 PM
  • I'm quite happy with 7, it's a good operating system.  That doesn't change the fact the feature I'm talking about is no longer included - yet you simply can't read.  Hence me asking you to stop posting, because you look stupid. Is that what you want? The world to see you look stupid on a forum?   I've tried helping you but you keep persisting and ignoring what's been said.  Why I don't know.     My problem is long since fixed, my copy of Windows is running fine.  This doesn't change the fact that an INSTALL repair from BOOT MEDIA is no longer a viable way of fixing a windows install.  -  This thread will help others in the future fortunately - it will also embarass you.

     


      who is always claiming this or that is not good in win 7 ? who refuses to listen when people try to help you ? you

    and if you dont get your wayyou start with insults or make a DL , .....

    why do you think so many people ignore your posts ? or dont bother to answer , ....

    fact is you have more repair options and far greater advanced at that then there ever was before in the OS , plain simple fact !

    now wheter you like being stuborn or are just bored and love to pick fights i dont know and i dont care , ....


    Scan with OneCare + Support ENDING for windows Vista & XP ! + Plagued by the Privacy Center? REMOVE IT + Threat Research & Response Blog + Sysinternals Live tools + TRANSLATOR + Photosynth + Microsoft Security + Microsoft SUPPORT + PIVOT from Live Labs + Microsoft Live Labs + Get OFFICE 2010 FREE ! 

    Your inability to read and comprehend what a thread is about (install repair) is embarassing.

    Stop posting, just stop - you've been proven wrong, you're wasting database space and time. Just stop.

    Thursday, February 24, 2011 9:49 PM