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"Code 5" when trying to boot from the DVD?

    Question

  • Any ideas about what this means?  Tried to install on a test machine that should be fine for installing the beta of Windows 7, but I can't get past this part.  I get told the disk isn't bootable due to a code 5 error and it then stops and tried to boot from the next bootable device.

    I'd like to play with the beta, but don't really want to put it on a main machine at this point.

    Thanks in advance.
    Sunday, January 11, 2009 3:17 AM

Answers

  • Guys, your main problem when you're trying to boot from the DVD for a clean install that you have no driver for the DVD drive, but only for a CD drive ... if you were trying to boot from a CD instead of a DVD, it would work. That's why you need to start the DVD in an operating OS. You can then tell it to install in the partition that you want it in for a clean install, and it loads the DVD driver there. You also need the operating OS so that the installer can connect to the internet to download the needed updates when it begins the installation.

    The one who said he only has a 20 GB hard drive can make two partitions of 7 GB and 12 GB, and temporarily install XP in the 7 GB partitions to get started. After Win7 is installed, he can delete the small partition and expand the 12 GB one to 19GB.

    Your biggest problem will be hardware that isn't compatible with Vista drivers. You'll have to replace whatever isn't.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 10:23 AM
  • I was getting the same error. Workaround: start the install from a running Windows system (i.e. use the in-place upgrade feature) and take it from there.
    • Proposed as answer by DaEmpi Monday, January 12, 2009 7:37 PM
    • Marked as answer by Lawrence GarvinEditor Friday, January 23, 2009 3:45 AM
    Monday, January 12, 2009 4:09 AM
  • Try this....

     

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproinstall/thread/4b23428d-85df-4554-a10b-72e70d61e66c

     

    6th post.

     

    ;-)

    Friday, January 23, 2009 12:13 AM

All replies

  • Did you burn the ISO with something like ImgBurn?  Did you burn it at a slow speed?
    ~Alex T.~Windows Desktop Experience MVP~
    Sunday, January 11, 2009 4:18 AM
    Moderator
  •  
    I've the same issue: Cannot boot from CD - Code 5. I've downloaded the ISO again, with the same results. I've also checked the MD5 (f9dce6ebd0a63930b44d8ae802b63825 for 32bit english version, file length 2.618.793.984) of the file and it is the same I've seen around the web, then I'm sure that the downloaded file is correct. I've burned the ISO (fortunately I've used a DVD-RW to make this) with different DVD-burning softwares and with two different DVD-recorders. The only possible answer is that the MicroSoft's guys have done an error during the ISO's creation.
    Monday, January 12, 2009 12:38 AM
  • I am using the 64-bit version. I initialy got the following message:

       1.
       2.
    Select CD-ROM Boot Type: _

    but then after modifying the ISO image (so that it didn't include versioning as ISO 9660 allows, and had fixed problems with Vista SP1 beta) I got the above error.

    Did you burn the ISO file as a file or an image? In my case I may have managed to make the disk unbootable (I may have messed up with the boot sector of the disk).

    Any answers or information are welcome.
    Monday, January 12, 2009 1:58 AM
  • You have to write the image file (.iso) to the disc using a low writing speed in order to prevent errors.  Ideally you want to verify the disc after writing it to make sure it matches the ISO My first attempt had an error during the verify phase.

    I used ImgBurn to burn my set of discs.

    Monday, January 12, 2009 2:08 AM
  • Oddly enough, the disk that gave me my original "Select CD-ROM Boot Type" error is the same one that installed on the computer I am on right now. However, It will not install on my 2007 15" MacBook Pro.

    I used ISORecorder v2 to burn the original ISO, and ImgBurn to reburn the versionless disk that is giving me the Code 5. I burned at max speed, and the verification completed successfully.

    Monday, January 12, 2009 2:22 AM
  • I am curious as to how to install onto Intel Mac hardware and am unsure of your details so I cannot determine if it is even attempting to boot from the CD or just going straight into an installed OS whether it be Mac or Windows.

    On a Mac, the first thing that occurs is that you go into a small EFI program and from there you get a choice to hit a certain keystroke in order to boot from a DVD (Apple-D) I dont remember it but it is easy enough to determine.

    I am unsure if you are doing this from the thread.

    From what I can tell most other people on these forums who are setting up on a Mac are upgrading from Vista which I assume is going through boot camp so it is on a FAT32 partition limited to 32Gb.

    I think the 64 bit version of Windows 7 is supposed to have EFI support so it wont be necessary to go through boot camp.

    I need to upgrade mine and get around to playing with this.

    Monday, January 12, 2009 2:41 AM
  • I was getting the same error. Workaround: start the install from a running Windows system (i.e. use the in-place upgrade feature) and take it from there.
    • Proposed as answer by DaEmpi Monday, January 12, 2009 7:37 PM
    • Marked as answer by Lawrence GarvinEditor Friday, January 23, 2009 3:45 AM
    Monday, January 12, 2009 4:09 AM
  • This workaround is not applicable on my situation: I want to install W7 on my old laptop with a little and formatted 20GB HDD...
    For beta Operating Systems is always preferable a fresh install, without multiboot... ;-)))
    Monday, January 12, 2009 3:38 PM
  • I am currently running Vista 32-bit and it will not let me do an upgrade to 64-bit 7.

    I am also using the Mac's "boot menu" (Holding down the Option key on boot) to tell it to boot to the DVD which is correctly labled as "Windows". I also have Vista installed on the full drive as NTFS.

    (I had a "falling out" with Mac OS 6 months after getting the Mac for several reasons... so I only use Windows on the laptop).
    Monday, January 12, 2009 5:34 PM
  • Hi.

    Same problem around here.
    So I tried to install from Vista but there wasn't enough space (8,2GB).
    Then I installed XP to do this but now it says that my PC is not ACPI-compliant. On another XP it didn't say anything about errors. Strange...
    That's why I think it  has something to do with the motherboard but I will have to live with that since I won't upgrade it.

    I still find this a bit irritating because it worked just fine with Vista (Business) even without  havign to install the Raid drivers and it is said that everything that runs on Vista would run on 7... -.-

    By the way. My System specs: ASRock K7VT4A Pro - AMD Athlon XP 2600+ - 768MB RAM - 2x250GB HDD (Raid0) - nVIDIA 6200
    Monday, January 12, 2009 7:36 PM
  • Try installing the 32-bit version. It installed just fine for me, even though 64-bit didn't... it may be an EFI/BIOS problem...
    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 3:19 AM
  • I did the in place install. In my case to a second hard drive on the IDE chain set up as slave(E:\).

    Win 7 did give me some static about having running accounts on XP and said it could not upgrade my C partition.
    I was not upgrading so I continued and choose to install on drive E when the available partions screen came up. Setup continued and logged those accounts off and restarted normally and showed a boot loader with the choice for older windows version below the Windows7 option.

    So far every thing seems to be working fine. If I were to do it again I would log all accounts off on the running OS before continuing with set up! 
     

    My system specs are ASRock K7VT4A Pro - AMD Athlon XP 1800+ -  1304MB RAM - 1x40GB HDD C: 1 - 18.5GB HDD E: Matrox 550 Dual Head GPU


    I hava four Memorex discs on my desk, two burned with Imageburn at 1X two with Nero 7 at 8x and 4X setting, written in two different LG drives . None will boot in this machine! Mother board has latest Bios, begining to suspect an error in mother board or drive cable.

    Imageburn Forums seem to be blameing some of these problems on bad media.

    Tuesday, January 13, 2009 7:54 PM
  • How old is your computer? Mine is around 4 years old and I think there are some BIOS incompatibilities while doing a boot from DVD. I have not been able to get a newer BIOS since this mobo is so old. Once installed on the HDD it seems to behave ok. I also wonder if this is limited only to AMD mobos?

    Best Regards
    Gireesh

    Wednesday, January 14, 2009 4:31 AM
  • I was getting Code 5 (previously "select cd-rom boot type") on my 2007 15" MacBook Pro, which uses EFI (with a BIOS emulation layer, possible problem?) and a 2.20Ghz C2D... So it's not just AMD mobos...
    • Proposed as answer by Tester7 Thursday, January 15, 2009 3:15 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Lawrence GarvinEditor Wednesday, January 21, 2009 10:30 PM
    Wednesday, January 14, 2009 10:27 PM
  • This error appears to be an issue somehow relate to IDE controllers. I literally used the exact same DVD, DVD Drive, and just plugged it into a PCI controller card and it would boot. Now after it booted though it freezes up on the system when "Loading Windows" Logo starts.

    As a work around I booted into XP, and initiated install that way to a new drive. Install works completely, but on first boot just after the Windows animated Logo appears it does the HAL initiation (the 3 keyboard lights flash) and then promptly freezes.

    So I'm guessing it's an issue with the Drivers not working with the chipset on the motherboard, MSI board with SIS 648 and 963 IDE chipsets.
    Thursday, January 15, 2009 3:20 PM
  • But why would 64-bit not work, while 32-bit does? And what is with the "Select CD-ROM Boot Type:" prompt? At least "Code 5" is a real error code...

    So, for those of you having problems with this on 64-bit, try 32-bit and see if that works... but if you are having problems with 32-bit... stay tuned, someone will have the answer eventualy...
    Thursday, January 15, 2009 7:13 PM
  • I am having the same issue with a code five error. I am trying to install W7 32 bit on a newly formatted disk.
    Friday, January 16, 2009 2:48 AM
  • I am having the same problem with 32 bit Windows 7. 

    I've never seen this error before on this machine. THE dVD boots fine on other systems
    Friday, January 16, 2009 8:44 PM
  • I am having the same problem with 32 bit Windows 7. Code 5 Can not boot!

    My System:

    PIV 2,4GHz, MSI 845PE MAX2-R, 1GB DDR PC400, Glub3D RADEON 9600 256MB, LiteOn-SOHR-5238S, DVD-RAM GSA-H20L, DVD-ROM GDR8164B, TFT Iiyama ProLite E431S
    Sunday, January 18, 2009 11:05 AM
  • Good to know I'm not alone. Leave it to microsoft to make something as straightfoward as a bootable image an absolute pain in the @#s. Must be the way I'm holding my tongue while praying while the recommended iso burning software destroys writeable dvd's. Maybe if I stand on my head while booting the system, it'll work. Knock on wood!
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 4:06 AM
  • THis may work. Copy the contents of the iso created dvd to a hardrive then copy the files to a dvd using standard software. Still may need a boot disk with cd support  to start the computer then change to that drive and type setup.
    Will let you know.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 4:18 AM
  • Another perfectly good dvd wasted. Microsoft appearently didn't make this release of the iso bootable. You would think that after having done such things for years, they would know how to do it.  I guess the initial part of the beta test is installation disk iso creation.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 4:52 AM
  • I've discovered that the disc that will not boot in my tower's lite-on dvd drive/burner will boot in my old dell laptop. Definitely a hardware issue. I'm going to try using an xp disc that will boot and when the  screen displays press any key to boot from the cd/dvd, switch the xp disk for the 7 disk. hopefully that'll work.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 6:31 AM
  • I got same problem.
    Disc can boot on My office's PC(Checked on DELL Dimension C521, IBM xSeries 205). But got "CODE:5" on my PC with same disc, and can't execute Setup.exe on working windows(maybe attributable in using windows2000) with error "__mb_cur_max_func() not found in msvcrt.dll," "WinSetup.dll loading failure. Can't continue setup." (Messages shown on Japanese)
    Disc re-burning on slowest setting, re-download ISO image, and Killing extended / onboard SATA interface was tested.

    I heard, BIOS update is good way to solve problem. But my system's BIOS is not updated since Nov.2004 and I already using latest BIOS.
    Perfectly stalemate...

    My System is:
    M/B: MSI KT6V-LSR (VIA KT600-based)
    Processor: AMD Athlon XP 2600+
    Memory: DDR-SDRAM 512MB (not enough, but I think it have no relation on this problem)
    Optical Drive: LG GSA-H42N (DVD-SuperMulti) connected to Onboard PATA
    HDD: Hitachi HDT72251 - connected to Onboard SATA
    VGA: nVidia GeForceFX 5900 XT - connected to AGP 8x

    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 6:37 AM
  • Maybe it's an intel vs amd thing?? My system's cpu is an xp 2600+. The old dell is a celeron. Changing the ribbon connector to the drive seemed to help, consistently code 5'd then, no more missing ntldr errors, but still no boot. The only things to try is seriuosly underclocking the system, different dvd media,  a fifth different iso burning software, or a different manufacturers drive. All my dvd drives are lite-on.  All code 5. Yet all work flawlessly disregarding this exception. Seems the best option now is to say farck it! If microsoft can not get simply distributing the software relatively trouble free,  I hate to imagine the hassles of actually using 7. Vista squared is probaly more like it.  Hopefully they'll offer a downgrade from 7 to XP. But anyhow, maybe if I stand on my head during a full moon at high tide on the east coast of England when Titan eclipses Saturn, the swallows return to Capistrano, a volcano erupts in Hawaii, a galaxy implodes and it rains in Cairo all the while whistling Dixie and humming the Battle hyme of the republic and drinking a glass of orange juice, this disc will boot in my system comprised mainly of new components. Seems the only reasonable thing to try.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 8:19 AM
  • Guys, your main problem when you're trying to boot from the DVD for a clean install that you have no driver for the DVD drive, but only for a CD drive ... if you were trying to boot from a CD instead of a DVD, it would work. That's why you need to start the DVD in an operating OS. You can then tell it to install in the partition that you want it in for a clean install, and it loads the DVD driver there. You also need the operating OS so that the installer can connect to the internet to download the needed updates when it begins the installation.

    The one who said he only has a 20 GB hard drive can make two partitions of 7 GB and 12 GB, and temporarily install XP in the 7 GB partitions to get started. After Win7 is installed, he can delete the small partition and expand the 12 GB one to 19GB.

    Your biggest problem will be hardware that isn't compatible with Vista drivers. You'll have to replace whatever isn't.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 10:23 AM
  • Just a piece of advice, if your system has the code 5 error when trying to boot from the DVD, more than likely if you copy the contents of the DVD to the hard drive while booted up in XP you will be able to install Windows 7 when starting the install from the folder on the hard drive. BUT BE AWARE, that there is a very good chance that after installing it won't work because the issue with the booting is hardware related and when Windows 7 initializes the HAL it will also freeze. Save yourself some time and try it on another computer where the DVD boots correctly. I've spent hours trying to get it past the Windows Logo on first boot after installing this way.
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 2:36 PM
  • There is a problem with many of the proposed solutions.

    A) I only had problems with the 64-bit version on my laptop, it worked fine on my desktop
    B) 32-bit installed fine on my laptop

    How about we try finding out what "Code 5" actually is instead of just guessing? Does anyone actually know? It seems to be happening on several systems, so it must be some BIOS standard or something, and it seems Google is no help on this one. Even on my MacBook Pro (EFI with BIOS emulation, maybe I need to remove the BIOS emulation, and that would help for me...), it gets a Code 5.

    Some one out there has to know, and have a solution that is actually usable (switching ribbon cables on a laptop isn't gonna work), and for many of us, a BIOS update isn't possible (Already at most recent version, using  Mac, etc...).

    Any BIOS/Motherboard manufacturers or MS guys out there that can help us?
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 10:15 PM
  •  After many frustrating attempts to do a clean istall on a fresh wd250jb, several -r and +r dvd's, unfortunately both types phillip's,  3 different, but all lite-on/sony dvd burner drives, I borrowed a Vista dvd and installed it, XP would probably work too, then ran the 7 dvd from vista and chose the clean install option. If I didn't miss something in my angst and haste, the 7 installer didn't give the option to format/erase and partition, only the option to move the complete vista install to an folder named Windows.old, which I deleted. My 7 install with drivers installed is at 7.5 gb. The Vista Windows.old file was app. 4.5. At least a 12gb partition would be neccessary to go this route. Adds a layer of time consumption, which is better than the time wasted, but fortunately Vista as with 7 is practically a stand alone installation. If I can get some different manufacturer dvd's, I still want to that a try since the ones made for the installation will boot in other systems. Nothing like good old pletharic incompatibilities.
    Thursday, January 22, 2009 10:16 AM
  • snafudbywindowsagain said:

     After many frustrating attempts to do a clean istall on a fresh wd250jb, several -r and +r dvd's, unfortunately both types phillip's,  3 different, but all lite-on/sony dvd burner drives, I borrowed a Vista dvd and installed it, XP would probably work too, then ran the 7 dvd from vista and chose the clean install option. If I didn't miss something in my angst and haste, the 7 installer didn't give the option to format/erase and partition, only the option to move the complete vista install to an folder named Windows.old, which I deleted. My 7 install with drivers installed is at 7.5 gb. The Vista Windows.old file was app. 4.5. At least a 12gb partition would be neccessary to go this route. Adds a layer of time consumption, which is better than the time wasted, but fortunately Vista as with 7 is practically a stand alone installation. If I can get some different manufacturer dvd's, I still want to that a try since the ones made for the installation will boot in other systems. Nothing like good old pletharic incompatibilities.


    You demonstrated what I've been trying to get across in several previous posts ... that you must have a DVD driver available for the optical drive that you're trying to boot the DVD from. That's why you had success when you started the installation process from Vista. The installer DVD loaded the driver into memory from Vista, so that it was able to restart (hot boot) to perform the install.


    Thursday, January 22, 2009 1:50 PM
  • Try this....

     

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproinstall/thread/4b23428d-85df-4554-a10b-72e70d61e66c

     

    6th post.

     

    ;-)

    Friday, January 23, 2009 12:13 AM
  • See, it CAN'T be a DVD driver issue, at least not in my case.  I ONLY had problems with the 64bit version, but NOT with the 32bit. It is also not possible (it won't let you) to install 64bit from within 32bit.

    It should also be noted that only the re-created disk (to remove versioning) gave the Code 5, before that it gave "Select CD-ROM boot type:", it may be a related issue...

    Someone mentioned RAM issues... perhaps, that could explain it, after all 64bit addresses RAM differantly than 32bit, so I wonder if that could be a reason.

    But what IS "Code 5"? What actually triggers it? How can this code be universally on ALL mobos and no one knows what it is?

    Wednesday, January 28, 2009 2:24 AM
  • I had the same problem with an relatively old computer... the problem here is the BIOS not reading the boot sectors correctly.

    After a couple of days testing ideas, I came to a workaround described here:

    http://www.sevenforums.com/general-discussion/2591-boot-error-code-5-a-2.html#post31719

    Basically, you'll have to use a boot manager disk to boot the Windows 7 DVD.

    At least, it worked for me.

    Regards and good Beta-Testing!

    AMD
    • Proposed as answer by AlfaMikeDelta Monday, February 9, 2009 5:29 AM
    Monday, February 9, 2009 5:29 AM
  • OK after all this time, I have an update:

    To Install Windows 7 clean on an MSI 6585 aka 648 Max motherboard you must do the following.

    Enter the bios, select "Integrated Peripherals"
    Set "USB Legacy Support" to 'DISABLED' This is the key to getting past the initial HAL load. (where the pulsing Windows Logo would freeze)

    Then to the clean install, since this motherboard also appears unable to boot from DVDs. Thanks to AlfaMikeDelta for his instructions here: http://www.sevenforums.com/installation-setup/2591-boot-error-code-5-a-2.html#post31719

    Use a boot manager floppy to boot the Windows 7 Install DVD
    - Download "Standard" version of Gujin from sourceforge
    http://sourceforge.net/project/showfiles.php?group_id=15465&package_id=17330
    Use 7-zip to uncompress http://www.7-zip.org/
    - Inside the uncompressed folder, you will find a file named "full.img.gz", unGzip this file

    - Now you will have a file named "floppy.144", this is the floppy image.
    - Download a "Floppy Image Writer", for exmple RawWrite (or WinImage) http://www.chrysocome.net/rawwrite
    - Grab a floppy and write the file "floppy.144" to it.

    - Put the Windows 7 Beta DVD in the drive.
    - Boot your PC with the floppy, it will show a screen searching for boot records in your computer, follow the instructions about the video resolution.

    - Once you are inside the GUI, there will be a list of supported booteable media, press the "F" key corresponding to the one that reads "no emul" or "no emulation" (it should be your DVD) or the title of the Windows 7 DVD
    - Pay attention to the message "Press any key to boot from CD or DVD", so do it!

    Like magic, your off and running with the dvd installer to load a clean image

    Monday, December 7, 2009 10:01 PM