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Need to repair a WIM file

    Question

  • I have bought a windows 7 laptop that comes with a recovery partition. My recovery manager doesn't work (factory reset and minimized restore is disabled) so I tried the command prompt option. I saw the script to run the recovery automated, but during extracting the base.wim file, it stops at 67%.

    What I want to do now is repair the WIM file for the recovery process to continue. I have searched the net for solutions but the only info I got was the DISM tool. I need to know how to repair the WIM file. Please help!

    Thursday, September 5, 2013 12:12 AM

Answers

  • Hi Glenn.A,

    Based on my understanding, base.wim file could not be backuped when you created the recovery partition. So you want to repair it. Right?

    As you said, you can use DISM to repair an offline Windows image in a WIM or VHD file, or an online Windows image. Please follow the steps below to use DISM:

    Step 1: Check if an image is repairable.

    1. Scan the image to check for corruption. This operation will take several minutes. For example, at a command prompt, type command: Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth.
    2. Check the image to see whether any corruption has been detected. For example, at a command prompt, type: Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /CheckHealth.

    When you use the /CheckHealth argument, the DISM tool will report whether the image is healthy, repairable, or non-repairable. If the image is non-repairable, you should discard the image and start again. If the image is repairable, you can use the /RestoreHealth argument to repair the image.

    Step 2: Repair an image.

    Use the /RestoreHealth argument to repair the image. For example, to repair an offline image using a mounted image as a repair source, at a command prompt, type command: Dism /Image:C:\offline /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows.

    Or to repair an online image using some of your own sources instead of Windows Update, type: Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows /LimitAccess.

    If you do not specify a /Source for the repair files, the default location for Features on Demand is used. For more information, see Configure a Windows Repair Source. If you specify more than one /Source, the files are copied from the first location where they are found and the rest of the locations are ignored. You can use /LimitAccess to prevent the DISM tool from using Windows Update as a repair source or as a backup repair source for online images.

    Regards,

    Lany Zhang

    Thursday, September 5, 2013 9:34 AM
    Moderator
  • It's very likely that the WIM files has been created using a third party application, mostly by SoftThinks. The following links may be helpful:

    http://www.softthinks.com/product_sds.html

    http://www.softthinks.com/product_PC.html

     

    You can try manual method:

    As you've tried extracting a WIM file, I presume you've allotted a drive letter to the recovery partition. From that point, I'm proceeding. Now, find the total partition used size. Suppose it's around 6.73GB, use an 8GB pendrive. If it's around 11GB, use a 16GB pendrive. And so on. Refer the following Wiki article on creating a bootable USB device: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/how-to-deploy-windows-7-from-a-usb-drive.aspx

    Once you create a bootable partition using diskpart tool from the above link, copy the entire contents from the recovery partition to the pendrive. Once done, restart the PC and boot from the pendrive to check it's working.


    Balaji Kundalam


    Saturday, September 7, 2013 5:32 PM

All replies

  • Hi Glenn.A,

    Based on my understanding, base.wim file could not be backuped when you created the recovery partition. So you want to repair it. Right?

    As you said, you can use DISM to repair an offline Windows image in a WIM or VHD file, or an online Windows image. Please follow the steps below to use DISM:

    Step 1: Check if an image is repairable.

    1. Scan the image to check for corruption. This operation will take several minutes. For example, at a command prompt, type command: Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /ScanHealth.
    2. Check the image to see whether any corruption has been detected. For example, at a command prompt, type: Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /CheckHealth.

    When you use the /CheckHealth argument, the DISM tool will report whether the image is healthy, repairable, or non-repairable. If the image is non-repairable, you should discard the image and start again. If the image is repairable, you can use the /RestoreHealth argument to repair the image.

    Step 2: Repair an image.

    Use the /RestoreHealth argument to repair the image. For example, to repair an offline image using a mounted image as a repair source, at a command prompt, type command: Dism /Image:C:\offline /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows.

    Or to repair an online image using some of your own sources instead of Windows Update, type: Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows /LimitAccess.

    If you do not specify a /Source for the repair files, the default location for Features on Demand is used. For more information, see Configure a Windows Repair Source. If you specify more than one /Source, the files are copied from the first location where they are found and the rest of the locations are ignored. You can use /LimitAccess to prevent the DISM tool from using Windows Update as a repair source or as a backup repair source for online images.

    Regards,

    Lany Zhang

    Thursday, September 5, 2013 9:34 AM
    Moderator
  • It's very likely that the WIM files has been created using a third party application, mostly by SoftThinks. The following links may be helpful:

    http://www.softthinks.com/product_sds.html

    http://www.softthinks.com/product_PC.html

     

    You can try manual method:

    As you've tried extracting a WIM file, I presume you've allotted a drive letter to the recovery partition. From that point, I'm proceeding. Now, find the total partition used size. Suppose it's around 6.73GB, use an 8GB pendrive. If it's around 11GB, use a 16GB pendrive. And so on. Refer the following Wiki article on creating a bootable USB device: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/how-to-deploy-windows-7-from-a-usb-drive.aspx

    Once you create a bootable partition using diskpart tool from the above link, copy the entire contents from the recovery partition to the pendrive. Once done, restart the PC and boot from the pendrive to check it's working.


    Balaji Kundalam


    Saturday, September 7, 2013 5:32 PM
  • I have tried using mounting the image and it seems index 3 and 4 which is related to the windows recovery files became corrupt. Is there any way to correct that error?
    Friday, September 20, 2013 1:09 AM
  • I have tried using mounting the image and it seems index 3 and 4 which is related to the windows recovery files became corrupt. Is there any way to correct that error?
    Friday, September 20, 2013 1:09 AM