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SOLVED: Cannot ping or UNC to Windows7 PC from Server

    Question

  • Greetings Folks,

    I can't ping or UNC to a Windows 7 test machine from our servers by the machine's name.  I can ping/UNC if I use the IP address, however.  Also, if I use the NBTSTAT -A command - where "A" is the machine's ip address, it returns the machine's name.  But still can't use the machine name itself for ping/UNC. 

    note: I disabled the windows 7 firewall, and this computer is on a subnet with a bunch of XP machines that don't exhibit this issue.

    note: I can ping the server and UNC to it from the Windows 7 machine.

    Any ideas?

    thank you


    anr


    • Edited by AdrianRoe Friday, February 24, 2012 5:11 PM
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6:04 AM

Answers

  • I resolved the issue doing the following:

    • Connected to the DNS server and verified that - using NSLOOKUP command - the PC appeared to "everybody else" as being in a 'non-existent' domain. 
    • Accessed the DNS mgmt console, where I saw in the Forward Lookup Zone for our domain there wasn't a Host (A) record for this computer (there was for all the other PCs in our environment)
    • Manually created a Host (A) record for this computer (using corresponding IP address from DHCP )

    Now I can ping the host from any subnet in our domain.  Thanks Wolfgang for advice on using NSLOOKUP command.  Stephan, I thought about using the IPCONFIG/flushdns command on the server, but was worried I could screw something up.  Will definitely use that - as well as "ipconfig /registerdns" next time around.

    Many thanks to All - have a great weekend

    Adrian


    anr

    • Marked as answer by AdrianRoe Friday, February 24, 2012 5:23 PM
    Friday, February 24, 2012 5:23 PM

All replies

  • bumper crop wrote:

    Greetings Folks,

    I can't ping or UNC to a Windows 7 test machine from our servers by
    the machine's name.  I can ping/UNC if I use the IP address,
    however.  Also, if I use the NBTSTAT -A command - where "A" is the
    machine's ip address, it returns the machine's name.  But still can't
    use the machine name itself for ping/UNC. 

    note: I disabled the windows 7 firewall, and this computer is on a
    subnet with a bunch of XP machines that don't exhibit this issue.

    note: I can ping the server and UNC to it from the Windows 7 machine.

    Any ideas?

    thank you

    DNS name resolution for this hostname is not working. First have a look
    at the IP-address the server is trying to ping if you enter the ping
    command - is this correct or not or does it say could not find host
    "hostname"?

    Then use nslookup from a command prompt to check which name servers
    your server uses and with what IP-address they respond, if you enter
    the hostname in question.

    Compare this with the results from a PC, where the pings work and post
    them both here.

    If you get a wrong address for the ping, but a correct address from
    nslookup you probably have an incorrect entry in your hosts
    (%windir%\system32\drivers\etc\hosts) file.

    NBTSTAT refers to the netbios name resolution protocol, which has
    nothing to do with ping.


    Wolfgang
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6:41 PM
  • I suspect that your local DNS cache directs you to an incorrect IP address. I suggest you clear your DNS cache and see the result.

    To clear your local DNS cache, run the ipconfig /flushdns command with administrator privilege.

    Also, is the machine is a domain client, make sure that you have the correct DNS suffix setting. Try to run computername.domainname and see the result.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    Friday, February 24, 2012 8:25 AM
    Moderator
  • Hello anr,

    please post the ping command and it's answers.

    If the W7 Client has also a connection to a wireless LAN, disable it. Sometimes the DNS Entry points to the wireless adapter IP which does not respond. Then delete the DNS entry for the client and perform on the client a "ipconfig /registerdns" or just restart the client with WLAN disabled.

    Then perform the flushdns command on the server and try again.

    Greets
    Stephan

    Friday, February 24, 2012 8:58 AM
  • I resolved the issue doing the following:

    • Connected to the DNS server and verified that - using NSLOOKUP command - the PC appeared to "everybody else" as being in a 'non-existent' domain. 
    • Accessed the DNS mgmt console, where I saw in the Forward Lookup Zone for our domain there wasn't a Host (A) record for this computer (there was for all the other PCs in our environment)
    • Manually created a Host (A) record for this computer (using corresponding IP address from DHCP )

    Now I can ping the host from any subnet in our domain.  Thanks Wolfgang for advice on using NSLOOKUP command.  Stephan, I thought about using the IPCONFIG/flushdns command on the server, but was worried I could screw something up.  Will definitely use that - as well as "ipconfig /registerdns" next time around.

    Many thanks to All - have a great weekend

    Adrian


    anr

    • Marked as answer by AdrianRoe Friday, February 24, 2012 5:23 PM
    Friday, February 24, 2012 5:23 PM
  • Hello Adrian,

    before using /registerdns on the client i would delete the static entry that you have created to ensure that the client creates it.

    Static DNS entries for normal clients aren't a solution. What if the DHCP lease expires and they get another ip ?
    The ipconfig /flushdns only affects your local dns cache and not the DNS server.

    Greets

    Stephan

    Monday, February 27, 2012 6:50 AM