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Change Windows 8 Pro to Enterprise

    General discussion

  • I was hoping I could do a quick version change from Windows 8 Pro to Enterprise. Does anyone know how I can do that? Do I have to perform an actual upgrade to Windows 8 Enterprise using the media? I was hoping I could perform the same kind of anytime upgrade like going from Home to Pro.


    Vincent Sprague

    Monday, December 17, 2012 11:45 PM

All replies

  • There is no supported upgrade from Windows 8 Pro to the Enterprise edition.  A "clean install" would be required.

    Carey Frisch

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 2:48 AM
  • I do not understand what you mean by "There is no supported upgrade from Windows 8 Pro to the Enterprise edition".

    That seems to be the only way.

    Enterprise is strictly an upgrade.  That's the only way it's offered, as a VL upgrade client OS.

    By "clean install", are you advising we install this upgrade onto a formatted (blank) hard drive?

    the information you've referenced, only relates to the licensing aspects - not the technical aspects.
    Ent editions are not a feature-upgrade from downlevel editions - they are a fresh/clean installation only.
    If you do perform some kind of inplace-upgrade over an existing downlevel edition (eg Win7Pro or WinVistaBus) then that is an untested/unsupported scenario and MS will not guarantee correct function/operation (which is expressed by MS as "unsupported"), and if you log a case with MS for support of such a scenario, they are most likely to advise you "please wipe and perform a clean install, to eliminate the probable cause"

    Don
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    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 10:31 AM
  • If you try to upgrade from Windows 8 Pro (retail or OEM), you'll get this message: "Windows 8 Pro cannot be upgraded to Windows 8 Enterprise. You can choose to install a new copy of Windows 8 Enterprise instead, but this is different from an upgrade, and does not keep your files, settings, and programs. You’ll need to reinstall any programs using the original installation discs or files. To save your files before installing Windows, back them up to an external location such as a CD, DVD, or external hard drive. To install a new copy of Windows 8 Enterprise, click the Back button in the upper left-hand corner, and select “Custom (advanced)”. 

    Carey Frisch

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 6:05 PM
  • The answer lies in the Reimaging Rights doc (pdf).

    "Volume Licensing customers can use their Volume Licensing media to reimage their Windows desktop operating system from an OEM only if it is the same product and version as that on the Certificate of Authenticity (COA) label that came with the PC."

    Contact a Microsoft Volume Licensing Specialist for further information or clarification.


    Carey Frisch


    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 7:00 PM
  • Yes, we are recommending exactly that.

    I'm highlighting the difference between the licensing (permitted use) and the technical steps involved.

    Win Ent is not an "upgrade" product, i.e. the setup engine of the product does not permit an install-upgrade over an existing installation of Windows. This means you have to clean install.

    Win Ent is considered an "upgrade" product - only from a licensing/use-rights perspective.
    Win Ent is also constrained (by the use-rights) such that you must already have an underpinning OEM or FPP Windows Client license, which you then (notionally) "upgrade" by assigning your VL benefit (Windows Client + Software Assurance, or, Enterprise Desktop, depending on which you bought) to the machine.

    The licensing agreement says that "full" licenses for Windows Client editions are not sold through VL agreements - only upgrade licenses are sold. So you are buying the right to wipe the OEM or FPP off the machine, and then install Win Ent. This is the upgrade the guidance refers to.

    [side note: neither Carey nor I are Microsoft employees, nor especial buddies. I assume Carey thought that my earlier response was helpful. I don't really track that stuff]


    Don
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    • Edited by DonPick Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:23 PM
    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:13 PM
  • Please Contact a Microsoft Volume Licensing Specialist for a definitive answer to your question.

    Carey Frisch

    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:53 PM
  • That's baloney.  Please, both of you.  If you know some facts then cite their official source.

    Well, thanks for being persistent. Your comments struck a chord with me so I did some digging around, and MS seem to have revised/clarified some of the technical library content (compared to all previous versions) - it seems to specifically answer your point, potentially in favour of your argument:
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj203353.aspx 

    Happily standing corrected!
    (I might even try it some time in a test rig, but unlikely I'd ever need to deploy an upgrade from one VL edition to a different VL edition, given the product stack we typically buy. People often ask if it's possible to upgrade from Retail to Ent, and that appears not to be possible, according to the library content, which is consistent with previous history)


    Don
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    • Edited by DonPick Wednesday, December 19, 2012 9:54 AM
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 9:51 AM
  • http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj203353.aspx 

    So, now that the dust has settled, from what I can see on that page, there is ABSOLUTELY no licensing path to upgrade Windows 8 Pro to Windows 8 Enterprise, right?

    But for the supported paths, per the table toward the bottom of the page, having already a version of Windows 8 installed, you would at the extremes be able to technically install Windows 8 and Keep Windows settings, personal files, and applications (in geek's terminology, upgrade) - or Keep nothing (clean install).

    The next question comes to mind, since in a situation that interests me I have Windows 7 Ultimate:

    What would it cost to buy Windows 8 Enterprise outright?  Yes, I've seen the "Contact a Volume Licensing Specialist" links above; I'm just looking for swag numbers based on other folks' experience.  Thanks in advance for sharing whatever anecdotal information you have.

    I wonder whose idea it was not to have a Windows 8 Ultimate.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options

    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 12:22 PM
  • Mr Monopoly, hope this helps:

    You buy a PC from an OEM, it has Windows 8 Pro or Windows 7 on it. 

    You want all the features of Enterprise, such as Windows to Go, Applocker or Direct Access.  Typically you want these because you are an Enterprise customer and have Active Directory, VPN, Remote Access etc.  So, to get these features in the Enterprise edition you become a Volume License customer and then purchase the "upgrade" license to allow you to install Windows Enterprise on your OEM purchased machines.   This can even include a Macbook Pro with Mac OSx for example. 

    Then it's up to you to download Enterprise ISO from Msoft and then deploy fresh installations of Windows on your OEM machines.  So yes, full clean format and install of the OS itself.   The license is upgradable, not the physical installation process. 

    The new feature versions of Windows 8 seem reasonably suited to their target markets.  Ie: You now get Bitlocker and Bitlocker to Go on Pro edition, previously you had to have Enterprise or Ultimate to get this on Windows 7. 

    Ash


    Ash Cox


    • Edited by AshCox Wednesday, December 19, 2012 12:58 PM typo
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 12:57 PM
  • What would it cost to buy Windows 8 Enterprise outright?  

     I think you'd need to sign up for a VL agreement (which has something like minimum 5 seats of either Office or Windows).
    You may also need to subscribe to Software Assurance on the Windows Client, to get it.

    I think you could buy 4 x Office, and 1 x Windows, or something like that.

    As to $$, not sure, since we buy at a different pricing level, the $$ we pay would be discounted compared to a "minimum" buy.

    I guess you've seen all the discussion about what Ent edition *doesn't* bring, e.g. WMC etc?


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)


    • Edited by DonPick Wednesday, December 19, 2012 8:27 PM
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 8:24 PM
  • Windows Media Center does not interest me.  Enterprise would be a better match for my needs.

    Assuming it's thousands of dollars to even begin to look at Windows 8 Enterprise, one has to wonder what would have been wrong with selling an "Ultimate" edition with all the possible features at a premium "home user" price for folks who just need one or two seats.

    I'm underwhelmed by Windows 8's feature set at $39.95 for "Pro".  I can't see spending more than a couple of hundred dollars to get Enterprise - the value is just not there.  My ROI analysis shows that even if Windows 8 Enterprise were free right now, it will be more expensive to run it than to continue with Windows 7 for a while, until the various driver and "new release blues" issues get worked out.

    Perhaps a "Windows 8 Ultimate" edition may be forthcoming.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my eBooks:  

    Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options
    Configure The Windows 8 "To Work" Options


    • Edited by Noel Carboni Wednesday, December 19, 2012 11:42 PM
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 11:40 PM