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Boot Performance Error but no error code? RRS feed

  • Question

  •    I check my Event Viewer on occasion to see that my start up and shutdown times are running consistent. I noticed today that my Boot Performance Diagnostics all have ERROR next to the 100, but there are no error codes indicating what is causing said errors and the boot times are actually not bad for a Windows computer laptop. I am sending along a screenshot of the errors so you can see kind of what I am talking about.
    Wednesday, May 1, 2013 2:08 PM

Answers

  • Here's a pretty informative post from InformationOverload on what those events mean and what triggers them:


    These events are defined in Windows Source code

     

    PostBootMinorThreshold_Sec(30)     // The time in seconds for postboot must exceed to consider minor issue.

    PostBootMajorThreshold_Sec(60)   // The time in seconds for postboot must exceed to consider Serious issue.

    BootMinorThreshold_Sec(60)         // The time in seconds excluding postboot must exceed to consider minor issue.

    BootMajorThreshold_Sec(120)        // The time in seconds excluding postboot must exceed to consider Serious issue.

    At the highest level, there are two separate scenarios for boot, the kernel scenario and the user scenario. Depending on the Scenario (long or short delay) the timer is started. There is a Kernel Timer and a a timer that is triggered for User. We'll start the Post boot timer when the Winlogon process launches the User's shell.

    Troubleshoot function calls BootScenario::PerformTroubleshooting.  This then performs calculations and then logs the event by calling OutputSqmEventLog.  OutputSqmEventLog calls EventWriteEx/EventWriteBatchEx to write the events.

    This will internally check the BSS trigger for the event.

    The Critical Events are logged when we cross beyond BootMajorThreshold_sec

    We basically calculate two options for the level we’ll attach to event 100, an option based on what is logged as MainPathBootTime (i.e. BootTime – PostBootTime), and an option based on PostBootTime alone. Whichever option is more severe/critical/whatever is what we ultimately attach to the event. For example, a PostBootTime of 0 to 30 seconds will get a level of Warning, 30-60 seconds gets Error, and greater than 60 gets Critical.

    We hope that this helps answer your questions.


    David J. This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights. Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Hope it helps :)
    • Marked as answer by Julio99 Thursday, May 9, 2013 10:26 PM
    Thursday, May 2, 2013 10:18 PM

All replies

  • I don't remember exactly what the threshold is but, this took 65 seconds which is why you are seeing that event.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ” How to ask a question that is fixable.

    Wednesday, May 1, 2013 4:09 PM
  •   I don't understand your answer at all. 65 seconds for a computer especially Windows is nothing. I am sending you another screen from 4/28 that the boot time is the exact same without the error. My problem is why is there an error now and there wasn't an error on the 28th. There are no error indicators like 101, 102, 103....... are you following me here. Usually Windows attaches a number to their errors to give you a sense of what is causing the error in the first place. These last ones that I have had all have error next to the 100 but what is the reason I'm getting an error???? 65 seconds sure isn't the error, I've had boot times in Windows that has been close to 3 mins. with an error but there was an explanation as to why.

    Remember, I am asking about the error not the fact that the Event is posted.

    • Edited by Julio99 Wednesday, May 1, 2013 7:23 PM
    Wednesday, May 1, 2013 7:21 PM
  • Here's a pretty informative post from InformationOverload on what those events mean and what triggers them:


    These events are defined in Windows Source code

     

    PostBootMinorThreshold_Sec(30)     // The time in seconds for postboot must exceed to consider minor issue.

    PostBootMajorThreshold_Sec(60)   // The time in seconds for postboot must exceed to consider Serious issue.

    BootMinorThreshold_Sec(60)         // The time in seconds excluding postboot must exceed to consider minor issue.

    BootMajorThreshold_Sec(120)        // The time in seconds excluding postboot must exceed to consider Serious issue.

    At the highest level, there are two separate scenarios for boot, the kernel scenario and the user scenario. Depending on the Scenario (long or short delay) the timer is started. There is a Kernel Timer and a a timer that is triggered for User. We'll start the Post boot timer when the Winlogon process launches the User's shell.

    Troubleshoot function calls BootScenario::PerformTroubleshooting.  This then performs calculations and then logs the event by calling OutputSqmEventLog.  OutputSqmEventLog calls EventWriteEx/EventWriteBatchEx to write the events.

    This will internally check the BSS trigger for the event.

    The Critical Events are logged when we cross beyond BootMajorThreshold_sec

    We basically calculate two options for the level we’ll attach to event 100, an option based on what is logged as MainPathBootTime (i.e. BootTime – PostBootTime), and an option based on PostBootTime alone. Whichever option is more severe/critical/whatever is what we ultimately attach to the event. For example, a PostBootTime of 0 to 30 seconds will get a level of Warning, 30-60 seconds gets Error, and greater than 60 gets Critical.

    We hope that this helps answer your questions.


    David J. This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights. Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Hope it helps :)
    • Marked as answer by Julio99 Thursday, May 9, 2013 10:26 PM
    Thursday, May 2, 2013 10:18 PM
  •  A lot of technical writing there, but to me it doesn't really tell me anything. The post above yours has boot times almost identical to the boot times that started this post. However they only have warnings next to them as opposed to the "ERRORS" You see, if all that stuff you sent me above is true, why didn't it apply to the boot times in my second post that only got warnings. I have had boot times before that went well over 2 mins. that didn't get ERROR and now all of a sudden my boot time is down to 60 seconds and I'm getting ERROR across the board.
    Friday, May 3, 2013 1:06 PM
  • I don't know what to tell you since the answers are in the replies you already have.  You could try doing a boot trace using xperf to figure out what is causing it to take so long.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ” How to ask a question that is fixable.

    Thursday, May 9, 2013 9:29 PM