none
Vista, Sysprep and Custom Desktop Icons RRS feed

  • Question

  • We use Vista and sysprep.


    We install Vista from the Vista DVD and then

    we put some specific software to the computer.

     

    Then we use sysprep to "seal" the computer for sale to the customer.

     

    When we use sysprep, all shortcuts and some specific programs we put on the desktop are deleted. For sysprep and XP there is a solution (KB307543), but how about Vista?

     

    Thank you for your help.


    Bye

    Silvio

    Thursday, November 27, 2008 9:22 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    I have included the following article for your reference:

     

    How to customize the default local user profile when you prepare an image of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008,

     

    INTRODUCTION

    This article discusses how to customize the default local user profile settings when you create an image on a computer that is running one of the following operating systems:

    Windows Vista

    Windows Server 2008

    Windows XP

    Windows Server 2003

    After you deploy the image, these settings are applied to all new users who log on to the computer.

    MORE INFORMATION

    What is the default local user profile

    When multiple users log on locally to the same computer, Windows uses the built-in default local user profile as a template to create user profiles for each new user. You can customize this default user profile when you prepare an operating system image. After you deploy the image, all new users on the computer receive the settings that you specify.

    Precaution

    When you follow the steps in this article, the default local user profile is changed permanently. Therefore, we recommend that you create a backup copy of the default local user profile, if you ever want to use it again. The default local user profile is located in the following folder:

    Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008

    Drive_Letter :\Users\Default

    Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, US English editions

    Drive_Letter :\Documents and Settings\Default User

    Note The Drive_Letter placeholder is the drive on which you installed Windows.

    How to customize default local user profile in Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

    You can customize the default local user profile by using the following unattend parameter in a answer file passed to the Sysprep.exe tool:

    Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup\CopyProfile

    To do this, follow these steps:

    How to use Sysprep to customize a default local user profile

    1.

    Log on to the computer by using the Administrator account or an account that has administrative user rights.

    2.

    Configure the settings that you want to use in the profile. This includes desktop settings, favorites, and Start menu options.

    3.

    Create an unattend.xml file that contains the CopyProfile parameter set to true in the specialized pass. For example, the parameter is set, as follows:

    <CopyProfile>true</CopyProfile>

    4.

    At a command prompt, run Sysprep.exe, by using the following command:
    sysprep.exe /generalize /unattend:unattend.xml

    Note You must use the /generalize switch for the 'CopyProfile' option to be used.

    5.

    Capture the image.

    6.

    Deploy the image.
    Notes

    The built-in administrator account profile is deleted when you perform a clean Windows installation, or run the Sysprep tool. The CopyProfile setting is processed before the built-in administrator account is deleted, so any customizations that you make should appear in the new user account profile, including the built-in administrator account profile.

    Not all customizations will propagate to new profiles. Some settings are reset by the new user logon process. For those settings, you should use Group Policy or scripting to configure those items.

    Examples of some setting that work with Windows Vista Enterprise SP1

    Change wallpaper

    Enable all desktop icons

    Screen Saver

    Change computer view to small icons

    Change start menu to classic menu

    Note We recommend that you comment this article about items that customers have set but did not get copied to new users.

    How to customize the default local user profile in Windows XP or Windows Server 2003

    In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, updates that you have installed may change the method that you use to customize the default local user profile. For more information, see the following sections:

    Windows XP Service Pack 2

    In this scenario, the default behavior is to automatically copy customizations from the administrator profile to the default user profile. Therefore, no additional steps are required to customize the profile.

    Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 or Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2

    In this scenario, the default behavior is to automatically copy customizations from the administrator profile to the default user profile. Therefore, no additional steps are required to customize the profile. You can disable this functionality by setting a parameter in the Sysprep.inf file which prevents the Minisetup process from copying the customizations from the administrator’s profile. To do this, set the parameter under the ‘UNATTENDED’ section, as follows:

    [UNATTENDED] UpdateServerProfileDirectory=0

     

    Windows XP Service Pack 3 or KB887816 is applied

    In this scenario, KB887816 disables the automatic copying of customizatons. Therefore, you must set a parameter in the Sysprep.inf file to enable the Minisetup process to copy the customizations from the administrator's profile. To do this, set the parameter under the 'UNATTENDED' section, as follows:

    [UNATTENDED] UpdateServerProfileDirectory=1



    Note Windows XP SP3 includes KB887816.

    Considerations when you use Automated Image Build and Deployment Systems

    The behavior and the instance when the settings are copied to the default user profile have changed in Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. Therefore, the location of the setting in the answer file that controls the instance of the profile copy during the process must also be different.

    For Windows XP or Windows Server 2003

    For the setting to be used in Windows XP Service Pack 2 with KB887816 installed, Windows XP Service Pack 3, or Window Server 2003 Service Pack 1, the UpdateServerProfileDirectory setting must be present in the Sysprep.inf file when you run the Sysprep tool. Therefore, when you use automated image build and deployment tools such as the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager the UpdateServerProfileDirectory setting must be included during the reference image build and capture process.

    For Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

    For Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, the CopyProfile setting must be present during the generalize phase. That is, when the operating system is started for the first time after you have run the Sysprep /generalize command. Therefore, the CopyProfile setting must be set to true in the Unattend.xml file during the image deployment process.

    When you are using tools like the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager, the CopyProfile setting is not required when you run Sysprep. These tools usually replace or modify the Unattend.xml file after the image has been deployed to the disk, but before the operating system has started for the first time after Sysprep is run. Therefore, the Unattend.xml file used in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager deployment process must contain the CopyProfile setting.

    Additionally, if you set CopyProfile to true when you run Setup from the Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008 installation media during the image build process, you may cause the unwanted effect of putting the Administrator's profile settings into the default user profile. The Administrator’s profile settings are typically present in the install.wim file on the installation media.

    REFERENCES

    For more information about how to configure default local user profile settings, visit the following Microsoft TechNet Web site:
    http://blogs.technet.com/deploymentguys/archive/2008/02/18/configuring-default-user-and-computer-settings-for-windows-image-deployment.aspx


    Hope it helps.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Monday, December 1, 2008 7:06 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Could you describe what options you're using with Sysprep?

     

    -Chris

    Monday, December 1, 2008 4:42 AM
  • Hi,

     

    I have included the following article for your reference:

     

    How to customize the default local user profile when you prepare an image of Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008,

     

    INTRODUCTION

    This article discusses how to customize the default local user profile settings when you create an image on a computer that is running one of the following operating systems:

    Windows Vista

    Windows Server 2008

    Windows XP

    Windows Server 2003

    After you deploy the image, these settings are applied to all new users who log on to the computer.

    MORE INFORMATION

    What is the default local user profile

    When multiple users log on locally to the same computer, Windows uses the built-in default local user profile as a template to create user profiles for each new user. You can customize this default user profile when you prepare an operating system image. After you deploy the image, all new users on the computer receive the settings that you specify.

    Precaution

    When you follow the steps in this article, the default local user profile is changed permanently. Therefore, we recommend that you create a backup copy of the default local user profile, if you ever want to use it again. The default local user profile is located in the following folder:

    Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008

    Drive_Letter :\Users\Default

    Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, US English editions

    Drive_Letter :\Documents and Settings\Default User

    Note The Drive_Letter placeholder is the drive on which you installed Windows.

    How to customize default local user profile in Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

    You can customize the default local user profile by using the following unattend parameter in a answer file passed to the Sysprep.exe tool:

    Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup\CopyProfile

    To do this, follow these steps:

    How to use Sysprep to customize a default local user profile

    1.

    Log on to the computer by using the Administrator account or an account that has administrative user rights.

    2.

    Configure the settings that you want to use in the profile. This includes desktop settings, favorites, and Start menu options.

    3.

    Create an unattend.xml file that contains the CopyProfile parameter set to true in the specialized pass. For example, the parameter is set, as follows:

    <CopyProfile>true</CopyProfile>

    4.

    At a command prompt, run Sysprep.exe, by using the following command:
    sysprep.exe /generalize /unattend:unattend.xml

    Note You must use the /generalize switch for the 'CopyProfile' option to be used.

    5.

    Capture the image.

    6.

    Deploy the image.
    Notes

    The built-in administrator account profile is deleted when you perform a clean Windows installation, or run the Sysprep tool. The CopyProfile setting is processed before the built-in administrator account is deleted, so any customizations that you make should appear in the new user account profile, including the built-in administrator account profile.

    Not all customizations will propagate to new profiles. Some settings are reset by the new user logon process. For those settings, you should use Group Policy or scripting to configure those items.

    Examples of some setting that work with Windows Vista Enterprise SP1

    Change wallpaper

    Enable all desktop icons

    Screen Saver

    Change computer view to small icons

    Change start menu to classic menu

    Note We recommend that you comment this article about items that customers have set but did not get copied to new users.

    How to customize the default local user profile in Windows XP or Windows Server 2003

    In Windows XP and Windows Server 2003, updates that you have installed may change the method that you use to customize the default local user profile. For more information, see the following sections:

    Windows XP Service Pack 2

    In this scenario, the default behavior is to automatically copy customizations from the administrator profile to the default user profile. Therefore, no additional steps are required to customize the profile.

    Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 1 or Windows Server 2003 Service Pack 2

    In this scenario, the default behavior is to automatically copy customizations from the administrator profile to the default user profile. Therefore, no additional steps are required to customize the profile. You can disable this functionality by setting a parameter in the Sysprep.inf file which prevents the Minisetup process from copying the customizations from the administrator’s profile. To do this, set the parameter under the ‘UNATTENDED’ section, as follows:

    [UNATTENDED] UpdateServerProfileDirectory=0

     

    Windows XP Service Pack 3 or KB887816 is applied

    In this scenario, KB887816 disables the automatic copying of customizatons. Therefore, you must set a parameter in the Sysprep.inf file to enable the Minisetup process to copy the customizations from the administrator's profile. To do this, set the parameter under the 'UNATTENDED' section, as follows:

    [UNATTENDED] UpdateServerProfileDirectory=1



    Note Windows XP SP3 includes KB887816.

    Considerations when you use Automated Image Build and Deployment Systems

    The behavior and the instance when the settings are copied to the default user profile have changed in Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008. Therefore, the location of the setting in the answer file that controls the instance of the profile copy during the process must also be different.

    For Windows XP or Windows Server 2003

    For the setting to be used in Windows XP Service Pack 2 with KB887816 installed, Windows XP Service Pack 3, or Window Server 2003 Service Pack 1, the UpdateServerProfileDirectory setting must be present in the Sysprep.inf file when you run the Sysprep tool. Therefore, when you use automated image build and deployment tools such as the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager the UpdateServerProfileDirectory setting must be included during the reference image build and capture process.

    For Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008

    For Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008, the CopyProfile setting must be present during the generalize phase. That is, when the operating system is started for the first time after you have run the Sysprep /generalize command. Therefore, the CopyProfile setting must be set to true in the Unattend.xml file during the image deployment process.

    When you are using tools like the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager, the CopyProfile setting is not required when you run Sysprep. These tools usually replace or modify the Unattend.xml file after the image has been deployed to the disk, but before the operating system has started for the first time after Sysprep is run. Therefore, the Unattend.xml file used in the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit or System Center Configuration Manager deployment process must contain the CopyProfile setting.

    Additionally, if you set CopyProfile to true when you run Setup from the Windows Vista or Windows Server 2008 installation media during the image build process, you may cause the unwanted effect of putting the Administrator's profile settings into the default user profile. The Administrator’s profile settings are typically present in the install.wim file on the installation media.

    REFERENCES

    For more information about how to configure default local user profile settings, visit the following Microsoft TechNet Web site:
    http://blogs.technet.com/deploymentguys/archive/2008/02/18/configuring-default-user-and-computer-settings-for-windows-image-deployment.aspx


    Hope it helps.

     

    Tim Quan - MSFT

     

    Monday, December 1, 2008 7:06 AM
    Moderator
  •  

    Hello Tim

     

    Thank you for your help!

     

    Bye

    Silvio

    Tuesday, December 2, 2008 10:52 AM