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Re: Cannot create a Restore Point or Restore to a previous one

    Question

  •  Hi .... When I try and manually create a restore point in Vista I get the following error message:

     

    Could not create the scheduled task for the following reason:

    Cannot create a file when that file already exists (0X800700B7)

     

    Coincidently this problem started when the last automatic restore point was created on Oct 26, 2008. Since then no other automatic restore points have been created and I can't create one manually either. Its almost as if the restore point creation process is stuck in constant write mode and won't create a new one automatically or manually.

     

    This error message occurs whether VSSCOPY service is running or not. I have all the required system restore files or dlls in system 32. I have also eliminated any possibility of it being caused by another program since the automatic restore point creation process worked fine up until Oct 26, 2008. 

     

    The following is the current content of my ONLY system restore registry key:

     

    "hklm\software\microsoft\windows nt\currentversion\systemrestore" and its values are:

     

    firstrun                       regdword     0x00000000 (0)

    lastindex                    regdword     0X000000BB (187)

    rpglobalinterval            regdword     0x00015180 (86400)

    rplifeinterval                regdword      0xffffff (4294967295)

    rpsessioninterval         regdword      0x00000001 (1)

     

    Please help if you can

     

    Thanks

    Ray

    Friday, December 05, 2008 10:02 PM

Answers

  •  

    Hi Ray, to troubleshoot the issue, I suggest we first perform the following steps:

     

    Use the System File Checker tool (SFC.exe)

    =================

    1.       Open an elevated command prompt. To do this, click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or click Allow.

    2.       Type the following command, and then press ENTER:

    sfc /scannow

    The sfc /scannow command scans all protected system files and replaces incorrect versions with correct Microsoft versions.

    To determine which files could not be repaired by the System File Checker tool, follow these steps:

    1.       Open an elevated command prompt.

    2.       Type the following command, and then press ENTER:

    findstr /C:"[SR] Cannot repair member file" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log >sfcdetails.txt

    Note The Sfcdetails.txt file contains details from every time that the System File Checker tool has been run on the computer. The file includes information about files that were not repaired by the System File Checker tool. Verify the date and time entries to determine the problem files that were found the last time that you ran the System File Checker tool.

    3.       Type the following command, and then press ENTER:

    edit sfcdetails.txt

    The Sfcdetails.txt file uses the following format:

    Date/Time SFC detail

     

    If the issue still occurs, let's try to create a restore point in Safe Mode and see if the issue still occurs.
    • Proposed as answer by Sean Zhu -Moderator Monday, December 15, 2008 3:14 AM
    • Marked as answer by Andy Song Friday, December 26, 2008 8:13 AM
    Monday, December 08, 2008 6:34 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  •  

    Hi Ray, to troubleshoot the issue, I suggest we first perform the following steps:

     

    Use the System File Checker tool (SFC.exe)

    =================

    1.       Open an elevated command prompt. To do this, click Start, click All Programs, click Accessories, right-click Command Prompt, and then click Run as administrator. If you are prompted for an administrator password or for a confirmation, type the password, or click Allow.

    2.       Type the following command, and then press ENTER:

    sfc /scannow

    The sfc /scannow command scans all protected system files and replaces incorrect versions with correct Microsoft versions.

    To determine which files could not be repaired by the System File Checker tool, follow these steps:

    1.       Open an elevated command prompt.

    2.       Type the following command, and then press ENTER:

    findstr /C:"[SR] Cannot repair member file" %windir%\logs\cbs\cbs.log >sfcdetails.txt

    Note The Sfcdetails.txt file contains details from every time that the System File Checker tool has been run on the computer. The file includes information about files that were not repaired by the System File Checker tool. Verify the date and time entries to determine the problem files that were found the last time that you ran the System File Checker tool.

    3.       Type the following command, and then press ENTER:

    edit sfcdetails.txt

    The Sfcdetails.txt file uses the following format:

    Date/Time SFC detail

     

    If the issue still occurs, let's try to create a restore point in Safe Mode and see if the issue still occurs.
    • Proposed as answer by Sean Zhu -Moderator Monday, December 15, 2008 3:14 AM
    • Marked as answer by Andy Song Friday, December 26, 2008 8:13 AM
    Monday, December 08, 2008 6:34 AM
    Moderator
  • Hey Ray, you and I must be the only people on the planet who have ever tried this, cuz google only turned up one link with this error message.

    However, I have a solution for you, at least it worked for me.

    Go to %windir%\System32\Tasks\Microsoft\Windows\SystemRestore

    In that directory, rename SR to SR.sav

    Try to create the manual restore point again.

    Having no clear idea how this task scheduling is supposed to work, after my manual restore point was created, I renamed the file back so I don't break who-knows-what.

    Maybe now that we have more detail about what's going wrong, Sean can provide a better long-term solution.
    • Proposed as answer by JBerg712 Tuesday, January 03, 2012 5:51 AM
    Monday, January 05, 2009 2:05 AM
  • I have the exact same problem as above.  Unable to create restore points, restore points only made after installing windows update software.  Tried to deactivate and reactivate system restore, tried to rename the system restore file as mentioned below, tried to use admin rights to do the above, tried to go into safe mode... system restore doesn't even exist in safe mode!  And cannot be activated either!  I'm at my wits end and getting really frustrated.  My pc is hp dv5t laptop with v64 home premium upgraded to vista ultimate.

     When trying to create a restore point, it says: System Protection   "Could not create the scheduled task for the following reasons:  Cannot create a file when that file already exists.  (0x800700B7)"

    Says the same thing when I deactivate system restore with the additional subsequent window:  "There was an unexpected error in the property page:  Cannot create a file when that file already exists.   (0x800700B7)  Please close the property page and try again.

    I have checked all my windows file as per the original suggestion, everything is in order, no file had an error.  Please help.  This is really frustrating!

     

     

    Monday, January 26, 2009 8:55 AM
  • I found that my problem was a file named SR by using Sysinternal's ProcMan (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896645.aspx).  Might give you something to look at.
    Monday, January 26, 2009 9:07 AM
  • LGS said:

    I found that my problem was a file named SR by using Sysinternal's ProcMan (http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896645.aspx).  Might give you something to look at.


    thanks for responding lgs!  i downloaded ProcMan, could you let me know what to look for... i.e. how you found the SR file that worked for you?
    Monday, January 26, 2009 5:03 PM
  • Start the capture just before you hit the create button, then stop the capture just after it finishes.  If, as the error suggests, the problem has to do with pre-existing files, look for CreateFile calls.  I can't remember if I filtered for a specific process, but if you can, obviously the problem is going to be towards the end of the capture.
    Monday, January 26, 2009 11:01 PM
  • LGS said:

    Start the capture just before you hit the create button, then stop the capture just after it finishes.  If, as the error suggests, the problem has to do with pre-existing files, look for CreateFile calls.  I can't remember if I filtered for a specific process, but if you can, obviously the problem is going to be towards the end of the capture.


    Thanks for your response LGS.  I tried looking for the CreateFile calls in conjunction with SystemPropertiesProtection.exe, but I don't see much.  It shows C:\ and D:\ with no file name afterwards. 

    I don't see anything that really sticks out.  I tried comparing to the ProcMon of another notebook (vista32) but I can't really tell any difference.  Let me know if you have any other suggestions. 

    I hope somebody from MS could step in to help too... Funny thing is that just the other week when everybody was touting Win7 I was perfectly happy with Vista... ugh, its like the old win 3.1 days all over debugging the system files.

    Tuesday, January 27, 2009 5:55 AM
  • Try looking at the process that contains the Task Scheduler.

    <set soapbox on>

    I just created a post the other day about the importance of diagnostics (here).  The response from that particular MS guy seems to be that if we can't put up an error message that grandma will be able to understand and fix, there's no point in putting up any message at all.  That combined with the belief that "it's impossible for *that* to happen, so we never check for it, and provide no possible fix" just makes me crazy.

    You'll notice that end user apps (Office, IE, etc) are starting to have Repair/Reset options.  These folks have had their faces repeatedly rubbed in the fact that s*&# happens.  And when it does, you can't just go telling customers to reinstall the app, or the OS, or buy a new computer, or re-evolve from a single-celled life form, or whatever the current go-back-and-start-over message entails.

    My belief is that two things Windows desperately needs are:

    1) Meaningful error messages.  I understand and support the belief that we can't be putting scary/incomprehensible messages up on the screen that intimidate grandmas.  But if that's really your concern, what's wrong with doing what the Error Reporting service does now (ie a "More Details" button)?  I can't picture a scarier/more intimidating-looking error report than a crash dump.

    But the underlying problem is that even if programmers were willing to display the detailed information, the info just isn't there to be displayed.  Virtually every Win32 api returns a 32 bit integer (or a BOOL) as the only error reporting mechanism.  Think about it: Service A calls Service B which impersonates the logged on user and then invokes a third party plug-in that calls a COM object that fails to read a file.  And we think we can describe who did what and where things went wrong by returning 0x2.

    2) Diagnose/repair tools.  I don't know how to say it any plainer: s*&# happens.  And when it does, life needs to go on.  If your subsystem requires certain files, registry keys, directory structures, permissions, etc, you need to have a tool that will (on command) check all that stuff to make sure it's in workable condition, and be able to repair it when messy life come along and happens all over your nice perfect software.

    And these two things need to be done on an OS-wide basis:

    - There needs to be a consistent error-reporting mechanism that all systems use, not logfiles here, system events there, windows messages for that one, etc.  Programmers need to know where to find the errors to report them, and customers need a single way to find out what went wrong. 

    -  There should be a single Diagnose/Repair console that can invoke all the subsystem tools and report system health.

    Sorry.  Hot button for me.  A pipe dream I know.  Still.

    <set soapbox off>

    Tuesday, January 27, 2009 9:42 AM
  • The removal of "C:\Windows\System32\Tasks\Microsoft\Windows\SystemRestore\SR" from the eyes of the System Protection applet was the correct method for my situation. For months I have pondered what could be wrong with my computer, that it threw up this error, forcing me to eventually turn off System Restore and leave my computer vulnerable to a devastating crash. But now that System Protection could no longer find "C:\Windows\System32\Tasks\Microsoft\Windows\SystemRestore\SR", I was able to activate System Restore once more, and even create a system restore point.

    Of course, when you posted this response almost 21 months ago, you were afraid that renaming this file could crash some integral part of Windows. I'll restart Windows soon and see if I've crashed anything, but for now, System Restore is up and running.

    Thanks to all of you for your help in my situation.

    Brandon Taylor


    Brandon Taylor
    Tuesday, September 28, 2010 11:17 PM
  • Hi LGS

    I had a same problem as VistaRay.

    renaming the SR file solved my prob.

    Thanks

    Sunday, January 23, 2011 4:00 PM
  • Hi,

    I got the same problem as VistaRay. Follow your advice, I renamed the file SR to SR.sav and can successfully create restore point and do the system restore. However, is it alright to delete the renamed file (SR.sav)? Because as long as I create new restore point, a new SR file is created in that folder. I don't know if this cause any mismatch files later on.

    Please kindly reply.

    Wednesday, December 14, 2011 4:10 AM