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XP to Windows 7 upgrade 32 bit to 64 bit??

    Question

  • Hi all,

    Tried finding the answer with mixed results.

    Can I upgrade my 32 bit xp to 64 bit windows 7 home edition upgrade?  I know if possible it needs a custom install just want to confirm that I only need to buy the 64 bit windows 7 home upgrade rather than a full edition to take advantage of the 64 bits??

    Thanks!
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 2:10 PM

Answers

  • Can I upgrade my 32 bit xp to 64 bit windows 7 home edition upgrade?  I know if possible it needs a custom install just want to confirm that I only need to buy the 64 bit windows 7 home upgrade rather than a full edition to take advantage of the 64 bits??

    You need only purchase and use the upgrade pack.  Both 32-bit and 64-bit install disks will be included in the retail upgrade pack, and you can use either of them.  The 32-bit XP install will serve as a 'qualifying version' to enable the installer to accept the upgrade key as a valid key.


    In choosing to use the 64-bit install you will be restricted to performing a 'custom clean' install.  No 32-bit version of Windows can be upgrade installed over to turn it into a 64-bit install with programs, data and settings still intact.  Backup and fresh start is needed for such a transition, and it can be performed using the upgrade pack!



    The responses suggesting otherwise are incorrect!
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:33 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    you can't upgrade vom 32bit to 64 bit due to differences in architecture.

    Greetings

    Christian
    Christian Groebner MVP Forefront
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 2:13 PM
  • So if my setup is 64 bit ready I can't do a clean upgrade install?
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 2:23 PM
  • Hello,

    You are eligible to get a 64 bit version of Windows XP. So you may first install that and then you can upgrade

    regards from www.windowsadmin.info


    ManuPhilip
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 3:30 PM
  • Hello,

    You are eligible to get a 64 bit version of Windows XP. So you may first install that and then you can upgrade

    regards from www.windowsadmin.info


    ManuPhilip

    I miss the point to this.

    I believe that it's not possible to do an upgrade-in-place from any 32 bit OS to any 64 bit one.

    It's also not permitted to upgrade-in-place any version of XP to Win7.

    A 32 bit XP installation qualifies for the use of a Win7 upgrade *license*, but a custom install is required. If you get the retail upgrade license, that custom install could be of the X64 version.



    Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:17 PM
  • Can I upgrade my 32 bit xp to 64 bit windows 7 home edition upgrade?  I know if possible it needs a custom install just want to confirm that I only need to buy the 64 bit windows 7 home upgrade rather than a full edition to take advantage of the 64 bits??

    You need only purchase and use the upgrade pack.  Both 32-bit and 64-bit install disks will be included in the retail upgrade pack, and you can use either of them.  The 32-bit XP install will serve as a 'qualifying version' to enable the installer to accept the upgrade key as a valid key.


    In choosing to use the 64-bit install you will be restricted to performing a 'custom clean' install.  No 32-bit version of Windows can be upgrade installed over to turn it into a 64-bit install with programs, data and settings still intact.  Backup and fresh start is needed for such a transition, and it can be performed using the upgrade pack!



    The responses suggesting otherwise are incorrect!
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:33 PM
  • Thank you!
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 8:44 PM
  • You are most welcome!

    :)
    Thursday, October 15, 2009 9:47 PM
  • Can I upgrade my 32 bit xp to 64 bit windows 7 home edition upgrade?  I know if possible it needs a custom install just want to confirm that I only need to buy the 64 bit windows 7 home upgrade rather than a full edition to take advantage of the 64 bits??

    You need only purchase and use the upgrade pack.  Both 32-bit and 64-bit install disks will be included in the retail upgrade pack, and you can use either of them.  The 32-bit XP install will serve as a 'qualifying version' to enable the installer to accept the upgrade key as a valid key.


    In choosing to use the 64-bit install you will be restricted to performing a 'custom clean' install.  No 32-bit version of Windows can be upgrade installed over to turn it into a 64-bit install with programs, data and settings still intact.  Backup and fresh start is needed for such a transition, and it can be performed using the upgrade pack!



    The responses suggesting otherwise are incorrect!

    I started with XP (32), installing 7 (64) from XP I get the "incompatible version" warning, I'm not allowed to continue and am directed to boot from the DVD. Booting to DVD over XP it was stated that I will overwrite XP and lose all data while creating a back-up "Windows.old". Of course, booting to a scrubbed HDD is not allowed as the old "show me the disk" upgrade routine is not included. Well 7's there, along with XP (32), on the same partition, I would think this to be a rather undesireable situation. The boot to DVD install option let me choose a partition so I was thinking of putting both OS's on different partitions, deleting the unwanted XP later, but I would prefer a clean install. Any ideas?
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 11:13 PM
  • "Of course, booting to a scrubbed HDD is not allowed ..."


    In actual fact it has been confirmed that the 'install twice' workaround used by many people for Windows Vista works also for Windows 7.


    If you have upgrade disk/key, and wish to install cleanly to a new hard drive in a machine with no 'qualifying' install yet in place, the following works:

    Boot from install disk
    Install Windows 7 as per normal, but do not enter your product key.
    After booting to desktop, pop the install disk back in the drive and run Setup from within Windows.
    Choose custom install and select the partition where you just installed Windows to.
    This time enter your upgrade install key and activate when ready to.



    For those people comfortable with registry editing and the use of command prompt the following is a 'single install' technique which has also been confirmed to work with Windows 7 Upgrade media/key:


    • Boot from the upgrade disk and perform a clean install without entering your product key.
    • Ensure that no updates get downloaded which require a reboot.
    • Fire up the registry editor and locate HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE/Software/Microsoft/Windows/CurrentVersion/Setup/OOBE/
    • Change the value of MediaBootInstall from '1' to '0'
    • On the Start Menu, right-click 'CMD' and choose 'Run as administrator' to open an elevated Command prompt.
    • Type slmgr /rearm and press <Enter>
    • Close the command window and reboot.


    Your clean, new install should now accept your Upgrade key and activate for you.





    Remember, though, that techniques such as this are provided for you as a convenience when installing.  You MUST have a qualifying earlier version license, and discontinue using it after you use your upgrade license, in order to be legitimately licensed. Unless you own a qualifying license and deem it void in the transition it does not matter that your new install is activated and validated.  It'll still be unlicensed if you put it in place without having voided an earlier license.

    These are installation techniques, not avoidances of your legal obligations.
    Sunday, October 25, 2009 1:14 AM
  • Thank you very much, both methods worked like a champ (on different computers). I modified >in bold< the first method slightly and have succesfully rebooted several times.


    Boot from install disk
    Install Windows 7 as per normal, but do not enter your product key.
         >Enter a "null" key and complete the first install. GoTo "Windows Activation", activation attempt will prompt for key and you're "good to go" without the second install<
    After booting to desktop, pop the install disk back in the drive and run Setup from within Windows.
    Choose custom install and select the partition where you just installed Windows to.
    This time enter your upgrade install key and activate when ready to.


    Certainly would not have easily discovered these methods without the help of these forums and all the helpful people.
    Thanks,
    Rick
    Monday, October 26, 2009 5:01 AM
  • Does this approach work if I'm dealing with a Windows 7 64 bit upgrade disk?  Or do I need a full version of Win 7 to make this work?

    Thanks!

    Friday, January 13, 2012 4:44 PM