none
How do I take a screenshot of the Windows 7 login screen?

    Question

  • I want to take a screenshot of the login screen so I can show people what it looks like.
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 4:16 PM

Answers

  • On Tue, 6 Jul 2010 19:52:05 +0000, windows7supporter wrote:

    By doing the following actions:

    1.) Getting a digital camera

    2.) Use the digital camera to take a photo/screenshot of the "login screen"

    3.) Take the memory card out of the digital camera stick it into the small & skinny slot on your CPU

    Please note the following two points:
    You undoubtedly mean "computer," not "CPU." CPU is an abbreviation for
    "Central Processing Unit." In modern personal computers, the CPU is a
    relatively small electronic chip, an integrated circuit. It sits on
    the motherboard, inside the computer's case. It is not the case
    itself, nor is it the total computer, which includes the case and
    everything within it.
    I'm not sure how the incorrect practice of calling the whole computer
    the "CPU" began, but here's my guess: when you buy a computer, you
    normally get the case and what's in it, along with a monitor,
    keyboard, mouse, and perhaps a printer. All of these peripherals
    connect to the case. Because everything connects to the case, the case
    is "central" to everything else and the term "Central Processing Unit"
    was misunderstood and misapplied to it.
    2. Your computer may have a reader for flash memory cards, but it is
    far from true that all computers have them. Moreover, even on a
    computer that has one, it may not have one for the correct type of
    flash memory card for the digital camera in question.

    To put point 2 into perspective, there are six computers in my house
    at this moment. Only one of the those six has a flash memory card
    reader, and it can read only one kind of card. I have two digital
    cameras, and each uses a different type of card. The computer with the
    reader can read the cards used in only one of the two cameras.


    Ken Blake
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 9:38 PM
  • By doing the following actions:

    1.) Getting a digital camera

    2.) Use the digital camera to take a photo/screenshot of the "login screen"

    3.) Take the memory card out of the digital camera stick it into the small & skinny slot on your CPU

    4.) Going to the Start Menu

    AND

    5.) Clicking on the, "D" drive or the, "F" drive

    6.) Getting the photo developed

    7.) Then, show the photo to your frends.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     As far as I know, you cannot manually use your PC to take a screenshot of the Windows 7 login screen

    • Marked as answer by Novak Wu Monday, July 12, 2010 7:30 AM
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 7:52 PM

All replies

  • By doing the following actions:

    1.) Getting a digital camera

    2.) Use the digital camera to take a photo/screenshot of the "login screen"

    3.) Take the memory card out of the digital camera stick it into the small & skinny slot on your CPU

    4.) Going to the Start Menu

    AND

    5.) Clicking on the, "D" drive or the, "F" drive

    6.) Getting the photo developed

    7.) Then, show the photo to your frends.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

     As far as I know, you cannot manually use your PC to take a screenshot of the Windows 7 login screen

    • Marked as answer by Novak Wu Monday, July 12, 2010 7:30 AM
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 7:52 PM
  • 1) Use a Virtual Machine!

    2) Remote desktop!

    2) Google!

     

    :)

    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 9:00 PM
  • On Tue, 6 Jul 2010 19:52:05 +0000, windows7supporter wrote:

    By doing the following actions:

    1.) Getting a digital camera

    2.) Use the digital camera to take a photo/screenshot of the "login screen"

    3.) Take the memory card out of the digital camera stick it into the small & skinny slot on your CPU

    Please note the following two points:
    You undoubtedly mean "computer," not "CPU." CPU is an abbreviation for
    "Central Processing Unit." In modern personal computers, the CPU is a
    relatively small electronic chip, an integrated circuit. It sits on
    the motherboard, inside the computer's case. It is not the case
    itself, nor is it the total computer, which includes the case and
    everything within it.
    I'm not sure how the incorrect practice of calling the whole computer
    the "CPU" began, but here's my guess: when you buy a computer, you
    normally get the case and what's in it, along with a monitor,
    keyboard, mouse, and perhaps a printer. All of these peripherals
    connect to the case. Because everything connects to the case, the case
    is "central" to everything else and the term "Central Processing Unit"
    was misunderstood and misapplied to it.
    2. Your computer may have a reader for flash memory cards, but it is
    far from true that all computers have them. Moreover, even on a
    computer that has one, it may not have one for the correct type of
    flash memory card for the digital camera in question.

    To put point 2 into perspective, there are six computers in my house
    at this moment. Only one of the those six has a flash memory card
    reader, and it can read only one kind of card. I have two digital
    cameras, and each uses a different type of card. The computer with the
    reader can read the cards used in only one of the two cameras.


    Ken Blake
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 9:38 PM

  • <Ken Blake>; <Microsoft MVP> wrote in message news:02504741-0d09-48a9-99d9-24f91ee3a4d9@communitybridge.codeplex.com...

    On Tue, 6 Jul 2010 19:52:05 +0000, windows7supporter wrote:

    By doing the following actions:

    1.) Getting a digital camera

    2.) Use the digital camera to take a photo/screenshot of the "login screen"

    3.) Take the memory card out of the digital camera stick it into the small & skinny slot on your CPU

    Please note the following two points:
    You undoubtedly mean "computer," not "CPU." CPU is an abbreviation for
    "Central Processing Unit." In modern personal computers, the CPU is a
    relatively small electronic chip, an integrated circuit. It sits on
    the motherboard, inside the computer's case. It is not the case
    itself, nor is it the total computer, which includes the case and
    everything within it.
    I'm not sure how the incorrect practice of calling the whole computer
    the "CPU" began, but here's my guess: when you buy a computer, you
    normally get the case and what's in it, along with a monitor,
    keyboard, mouse, and perhaps a printer. All of these peripherals
    connect to the case. Because everything connects to the case, the case
    is "central" to everything else and the term "Central Processing Unit"
    was misunderstood and misapplied to it.
    2. Your computer may have a reader for flash memory cards, but it is
    far from true that all computers have them. Moreover, even on a
    computer that has one, it may not have one for the correct type of
    flash memory card for the digital camera in question.

    To put point 2 into perspective, there are six computers in my house
    at this moment. Only one of the those six has a flash memory card
    reader, and it can read only one kind of card. I have two digital
    cameras, and each uses a different type of card. The computer with the
    reader can read the cards used in only one of the two cameras.


    Ken Blake

    Your guess is correct, I believe. I can remember the case was called the CPU, and the whole thing together a Personal Computer. I remember it being particularly prevalent around the time the 80286 systems became most popular. Every once in a while, a fax modem would be thrown in as one of the peripherals (ooh ahh!). Now THAT was a deal! ;-)


    SC Tom

    Wednesday, July 07, 2010 12:56 AM
  • welcomescreen

    All of the utilities I’ve seen only takes the screen shot of any part of the desktop or program, but no utilities captures the screenshot of the login screen. Even “Print Screen” key will not work for that.

    The new version WinBubble takes that into the new level.

    Print Screen Alternative

    WinBubble snapshot tool lets you capture and save the picture in jpeg images to drive C:\

    captured

     

     

    Click the Windows 7 TabLogon Tools option and hit the snapshot tool.

    Works great in Windows 7 32/64 bit version!

    The newest version also works well in Windows Vista. Just Open the Windows Utilities Tab and Click the Logon Tools Option.

    logontool

    Click Yes and Reboot your PC.

    NOTE: The main annoyance is, you need to re-open again the program after restarting your computer and do the procedure again to be able to activate the feature.

    Anyway the great thing, It works!

    Enjoy!

    Monday, August 16, 2010 4:21 AM
  • Pottsy1981 - or anyone! - Could you possibly provide a bit more guidance here...?

    I have installed WinBubble, and can now access it from the Welcome Screen - but all I have managed to take a screen capture of is the Welcome Screen with the WinBubble window sitting over the top of it. A few suggested steps for Dummies would be much appreciated.

    Thank you in anticipation!

     

    Monday, November 29, 2010 2:25 PM
  • VNC to the machine.  UltraVNC, TightVNC, etc.

    Thursday, May 03, 2012 2:43 AM
  • what i did was:

    1) i took a screenshot w/ the winbubble window on both the left & right sides of the screen

    2) opened both screenshots in paint

    3) cropped the left side of the screenshot w/o the winbubble window on the left side (so the one that shows the background on the left)

    4) pasted what i cropped over the winbubble window on the other screenshot

    5) dragged it over until it lined up good & covered the winbubble window

    PS: i had to copy and paste the new edited screen shot into a new paint document cause it wouldn't let me save it in the existing document, but u might not have to do that

    yeah, it took a while to do, but hopefully that makes sense =]

    Thursday, July 12, 2012 3:31 PM
  • I installed Team Viewer on both the machine i wanted the screenshot of and also my laptop i then connected to my desktop through team viewer on my laptop and clicked take screenshot.

    All done jobs a good en?

    Tuesday, July 31, 2012 12:25 AM