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Assigning a letter to OEM Partition RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm trying to do an exact clone of my laptop that's running Windows 8. There is an OEM partition that I can't assign a letter to. I'm using DISM, which uses the drive letters to know what to capture.

    I was wondering if there was a way to assign a letter to the OEM partition. I've looked at diskpart and assign letter does not work for OEM partitions. I was wondering if there was a work around.

    Also I looked into partitions and volumes and it was a bit confusing, how are they correlated? Are volumes subsets of partitions?
    Friday, August 2, 2013 5:38 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    I would like to verify if there is any description on the OEM partition. Here is a similar post for your reference.

    http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/desktop/f/3514/t/19361979.aspx

    Regarding the Volumes and Partition question, please refer to this article.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd163559.aspx


    Niki Han
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Wednesday, August 14, 2013 5:54 AM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 12:32 PM
  • The OEM partition is typically a special recovery partition that is not meant to be browsed.  Assigning a drive letter would gain you nothing.

    Using DISM, the OEM partition should not be an issue as it seems you are using Windows 8/8.1 at your job.  The OEM partition is primarily for home-based, end users; not for corporate entities.

    As a matter of fact, you can safely delete the OEM partition--when doing a clean install--with no ill effect.

    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Wednesday, August 14, 2013 5:54 AM
    Friday, August 9, 2013 2:10 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    I would like to verify if there is any description on the OEM partition. Here is a similar post for your reference.

    http://en.community.dell.com/support-forums/desktop/f/3514/t/19361979.aspx

    Regarding the Volumes and Partition question, please refer to this article.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd163559.aspx


    Niki Han
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Wednesday, August 14, 2013 5:54 AM
    Monday, August 5, 2013 12:32 PM
  • Its possible that partition is the recovery partition. Usually that partition is locked so that you can't make changes to it from Windows.
    Monday, August 5, 2013 2:57 PM
  • The OEM partition is typically a special recovery partition that is not meant to be browsed.  Assigning a drive letter would gain you nothing.

    Using DISM, the OEM partition should not be an issue as it seems you are using Windows 8/8.1 at your job.  The OEM partition is primarily for home-based, end users; not for corporate entities.

    As a matter of fact, you can safely delete the OEM partition--when doing a clean install--with no ill effect.

    • Marked as answer by Niki Han Wednesday, August 14, 2013 5:54 AM
    Friday, August 9, 2013 2:10 AM
  • I respectfully disagree with DarienHawk67 regarding the OEM partition. It may be a recovery partition or it may be a hibernation partition, though usually recovery partitions are shown as recovery and hibernation partitions are shown as OEM. There are many exceptions. Further, indicating it can be safely deleted with no ill effect is a bit cavalier, especially without confirming his situation. It could be his own personal laptop that he is bringing to work. It may be a different situation entirely. Assumptions can cause a lot problems.

    Depending on the type of partition it is, there may be a workaround or there may be no need for a workaround. If it is a recovery partition, you can change it's type, then assign a letter, do your copying, then remove the letter and change it back to it's original type. If it's a hibernation partition, then you do not need to copy it, as it will not contain any data useable in a file system. When it's time to replicate the disk, you simply create a new hibernation partition that's just a little bit larger than the amount of RAM you have in the computer the new drive is going to be used in

    To determine the type. run command prompt in elevated mode (Run as Administrator) and at the command prompt do the following:

    Diskpart

    list disk    - after running this, take note of how many disks and their numbers. Disk number can also be gotten by running disk management from the list that shows when you search programs and files for msc, or from control panel -> all control panel items -> administrative tools -> Disk Management

    select disk #   - replace # with the number associated with disk in question, that you got from the previous step

    list partition  - similar to list disk, except you can't this number from the disk management.msc I mentioned in list disk step. note the number for the OEM partition.

    select partition #  - replace # with the number from the previous step.

    detail partition  - this will give some details about the partition. What we're interested in is the type. If it is type 27, then it IS a recovery partition. if it is type 12, 84, A0, DE or FE, it is a hibernation partition and you can't copy it, you need to make a new one on the new hard drive. If it is type 27, then go to the next step.

    set id=07 override  - this makes it a "regular" partition

    assign letter=x  - x can be any UNUSED letter you want. At this point it has a drive letter. Do your copying/imaging. When done next step

    remove letter=x

    set id=27 override

    you're done with this part. if you need to create a hibernation volume on the new disk, it is done as follows:

    remember the type from the detail step. If it is a number other 84, it MAY be required by BIOS to be that specific type of hibernation partition. If you are just creating one so you can hibernate, then we will use 84 (the most common and SEEMINGLY the most versatile.) Further, the hibernation partition should be the first or second partition on the drive (some versions of BIOS require it to be, nut some do not.) Determine how much RAM/memory your system has and if you will be upgrading. If you will be upgrading the RAM, we will use that capacity. Take the amount of RAM in GB and multiply by 1024, then add 512. We add the 512MB as a safety factor; most of the time it isn't needed. For this example we'll assume 8GB.

    2GB = 2048 + 512 = 2560         4GB = 4096 + 512 = 4608          6GB = 6144 + 512 = 5120

    8GB = 8192 + 512 = 8704        16GB = 16384 + 512 = 16896    32GB = 32768 + 512 = 33280

    elevated command prompt, as before

    diskpart

    select disk 0

    create partition primary id=84 size=8704       - if the OEM partition was different number (or 2 letters, these are hexadecimal numbers) and you are installing a different hard drive into the same system, then use those. If this a new or different system, use 84 unless something in the user manual tells you otherwise. size is in megabytes.

    If you are putting the images you just made on to this system, then we need to change the ID of the recovery volume. So go ahead restore the images to the remaining space on this hard drive and open the elevated command prompt again.

    diskpart

    select disk 0

    list partition   - take note of 2 numbers this time. I'm assuming the new hard drive is larger than the old one, so the images won't use all the space. We will fix that. Take note of the data partition number and the recovery partition number. You should be able to tell which is which by their sizes. for this example we will assume the recovery partition is 2 and the data partition is 4. There will probably a small 100MB or 200MB partition as well. that small one is the Microsoft System Reserved or MSR partition. It gets left as is. Also take not of the drive letter assigned to the recovery partition. I will assume letter x, but it will be something else in reality.

    Select partition 2

    set id=27

    remove letter=x

    select partition 4

    extend   - This "stretches" the partition and the volume to use all the remaining space on the hard drive.

    detail partition

    detail volume  - make sure the size of the partition is the same as the capacity of the volume. It should be, but if it isn't then next step, if it is skip the next step.

    extend filesystem

    exit

    And you're done! Good luck. Sorry about being so verbose on this one, but some of these commands can really get screwed up if not done exactly right. Hope this is a more meaningful answer and set of directions for your work around.

    • Proposed as answer by Techno Wizard Monday, October 21, 2013 12:24 PM
    Monday, October 21, 2013 12:24 PM